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Recommendations On Budget Friendly Binoculars

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Will be in Alaska next month and I'm looking for recommendations on budget Friendly, small, lightweight binoculars.

 

I'm well aware that you get what you pay for with optics, but quite frankly I'm not looking to spend $$$ on something I'll maybe use for a week on the cruise and then never again.

Hoping to keep it under $50. Just a basic pair of Bushnell's? Seems like a lot of choices on Amazon. Any recommendations?

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Buying binoculars was so confusing-we bought this thru Amazon, I believe about $50.

 

They state they are waterproof, fog proof & can be used with glasses-we don’t go until June but DH has been using them in FL -so far so good.

 

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^+1 - we've had great use out of our Celestron 8x40s. They frequently feature as 'best budget buy' options for astronomy, binocs and scopes. We settled on an x40 rather than an x50 set as they were light enough my wife could still easily manage to hold them up for a long time (whale-watching off the Oregon coast - even though thousands of whales motor through twice a year close enough to see from land, it's still only low double-digits of whales per hour on a busy day at any particular spot so scanning slowly across a broad expanse of sea takes up much of the time spent). we only paid ~US$24 through Amazon with free shipping.

 

If you have bigger hands, their 7x50s would give an even bigger field of view and be more useful on a ship (too much magnification means lots of shake with even modest ship movement, and budget binocs do not come with image stabilization!) - usually one of us has a camera out so the other uses the binocs and one pair works for both of us, but we've had a couple of "Quick! Look there!" incidents where we've missed it thanks to having to reset focus when handing them over so I'm considering a pair of these for me...

 

We've had tiny pairs of 10/12x25s for years, but even strictly when land touring these suck for finding things - very small, very light, but too small a field of view for the magnification and really poor whenever it's getting dark or even heavily overcast. They pretty much just live at home for checking out location filming sets to see which star is masquerading 'fake-movie-name-of-the-month.'

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We went real inexpensive on our Alaska cruise last year. Wife had a compact pair of 8x25 and I went to Harbor Freight and bought a 10x50 for less than $20. Guess which pair my wife wound up using! We rarely use binoculars so this worked perfectly fine - for us........

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I found a list of the 10 best binoculars for under $100 just for my trip to Alaska next month. The ones I decided on were at Amazon. Well below $100 at $58.50 with free shipping plus tax was a total of only $62.30. I could have almost bought two pair for the $100... They came in about a week ago and I'm, so far, very happy with them. They are Bushnell PowerView 10x50 in camo. I felt like I got a good deal.YTAHyRdYbyuc0pwEQAAAA=

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Last year , I bought Bushnell Perma Focus 10X50 binoculars from Walmart.Com for $48 that included a 5% discount when I choose to be picked up at the store. Amazon wanted $74.00. Checkout Walmart.com as they have by far, the lowest prices. Also, if you are dissatisfied with the Binocular or any other item, you can return it to the nearest Walmart store for a refund.

This is an excellent choice for whale watching and you scan the water and land to spot and view sea life and wildlife. All the reviews give this a 5 Star Rating.

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Last year , I bought Bushnell Perma Focus 10X50 binoculars from Walmart.Com for $48 that included a 5% discount when I choose to be picked up at the store. Amazon wanted $74.00. Checkout Walmart.com as they have by far, the lowest prices. Also, if you are dissatisfied with the Binocular or any other item, you can return it to the nearest Walmart store for a refund.

This is an excellent choice for whale watching and you scan the water and land to spot and view sea life and wildlife. All the reviews give this a 5 Star Rating.

 

Here is the problem w "perma focus" binoculars. What this really means is that they are in focus only in one spot which is usually far away and out of focus everywhere else. If something is sort of close, they will be really out of focus. You want binoculars that will be sharp at all points.

 

Note this line in the product description in Amazon - "Note: Focus-free models are designed for viewing distant subjects. The close-focus limit is subjective and dependent on the user's eyesight."

 

DON

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I did a lot of review-reading on Amazon and initially ordered birding favorite Wingspan Optics Wingcatcher 8x42 weighing 1.5 lbs. for @ $130. When it arrived, I loved the clarity and functions, but, compared to my husband’s older, more-compact binoculars, I knew these were too heavy for me. I returned the Wingcatcher for the lighter Wingspan Spectator (8 x 32) at .94 lbs. who knew that 1/2 lb could make such a difference around my neck? These lighter ones are highly-rated, fog & waterproof, with a lifetime guarantee - and $35 cheaper. For me, the best reasonable binoculars are the ones light enough to effortlessly carry.

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Here is the problem w "perma focus" binoculars. What this really means is that they are in focus only in one spot which is usually far away and out of focus everywhere else. If something is sort of close, they will be really out of focus. You want binoculars that will be sharp at all points.

 

Note this line in the product description in Amazon - "Note: Focus-free models are designed for viewing distant subjects. The close-focus limit is subjective and dependent on the user's eyesight."

 

DON

 

Any object less than 65 feet distance could be out of focus. After 65 feet to infinity is focused. Why would you be looking at something within 65 feet with Binoculars. I found that I get a clear focus and seeing and spotting whales and wildlife on my Alaska cruise sometimes 2 miles away. I have used these Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 binoculars with my contacts in and contacts out and with the auto focus and have always got a crystal clear view. Read the reviews on this binocular- all rated excellent.

Walmart.com has the cheapest prices on Binoculars and with the Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 if you don't like it and I doubt whether you won't, you can return it to your nearest Walmart store for a refund.

Edited by chewap

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Any object less than 65 feet distance could be out of focus. After 65 feet to infinity is focused. Why would you be looking at something within 65 feet with Binoculars. I found that I get a clear focus and seeing and spotting whales and wildlife on my Alaska cruise sometimes 2 miles away. I have used these Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 binoculars with my contacts in and contacts out and with the auto focus and have always got a crystal clear view. Read the reviews on this binocular- all rated excellent.

Walmart.com has the cheapest prices on Binoculars and with the Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 if you don't like it and I doubt whether you won't, you can return it to your nearest Walmart store for a refund.

 

Birds. Sea mammals that are close to you on an excursion. Details of an object that is close to you on land. A fox that is close to you on the road when you are taking your Denali tour. I can think of lots of stuff that would be closer to you than 65 feet on an AK trip.

 

I actually bought a fairly expensive new pair of binoculars so that I could focus down to about 6 feet. My older ones were good but I did not realize that they could only focus down to maybe 15 feet.

 

With optics, basically you get what you pay for. As long as you realize that, you are OK.

 

DON

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Birds. Sea mammals that are close to you on an excursion. Details of an object that is close to you on land. A fox that is close to you on the road when you are taking your Denali tour. I can think of lots of stuff that would be closer to you than 65 feet on an AK trip.

 

I actually bought a fairly expensive new pair of binoculars so that I could focus down to about 6 feet. My older ones were good but I did not realize that they could only focus down to maybe 15 feet.

 

With optics, basically you get what you pay for. As long as you realize that, you are OK.

 

DON

Why would you need Binoculars to look at an object at 6 ft out or even 15 feet out like you say. On the Danali tour, you had to stay in the National Park Busses and they had monitors that had a telescoping camera to see the various wildlife. You could not get out of the bus except at the rest stops. They would stop the bus and you had to look out and use your Binocular through the windows to view wildlife from 1/2 mile to 2 miles away. For $50 at Walmart.com, the Bushnell Perma Focus 10X50 is an outstanding buy and product.

Edited by chewap

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Why would you be looking at something within 65 feet with Binoculars.

 

For the details. I regularly look at birds out my window, maybe 20 ft. away, with my binoculars. Birds up in trees.

To determine if a young moose in spring is a bull or cow.

One time I watched a heron out the car window; it was maybe 25 ft. away. Watching the delicate feathers rippling in the wind was amazing.

Flowers out the car or bus or train window.

Looking into a wolf's eyes. Or any other animal's eyes.

If you don't have an excellent pair of binoculars you have no idea how useful and pleasurable they are.

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For the details. I regularly look at birds out my window, maybe 20 ft. away, with my binoculars. Birds up in trees.

To determine if a young moose in spring is a bull or cow.

One time I watched a heron out the car window; it was maybe 25 ft. away. Watching the delicate feathers rippling in the wind was amazing.

Flowers out the car or bus or train window.

Looking into a wolf's eyes. Or any other animal's eyes.

If you don't have an excellent pair of binoculars you have no idea how useful and pleasurable they are.

 

+1. The problem w really excellent binoculars is that they are also really expensive. In a recent trip to Costa Rica, several of our group had really serious birding binoculars - Leitz and Swarovski. They let me borrow them for a bit and the difference between them and my ~$600 binoculars was beyond belief. After the trip, I was tempted to go out and buy a set but I figured that the cost of the divorce was not worth the money.

 

Another problem with the cheap optics is that the manufacturer QC tends to be non-existent. You may be lucky to get a pair that is marginally acceptable or you may be unlucky and get a set that is totally unacceptable. That is one reason that I recommend that one should never buy optics and especially inexpensive optics on the internet. You need to try them out first.

 

The moral of the story is that you should not look at or try out stuff that you can't afford. LOL!! or SOB..

 

DON

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Don't buy online unless you have actually handled them in store. Weight, size and what you can actually see with them should be your guide. Large sporting goods store for sure. Those small $15 models are a waste of money.

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Don't buy online unless you have actually handled them in store. Weight, size and what you can actually see with them should be your guide. Large sporting goods store for sure. Those small $15 models are a waste of money.

 

Most stores have a very limited supply of Binoculars. The best binocular for Alaska viewing is the highly rated Bushnell Permafocus 10x50 Binocular. You can buy it at Walmart.com for $50 with 2 day free shipping. If you don't like it, which I doubt you won't, you can return it to the nearest Walmart for a refund.

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I did a lot of review-reading on Amazon and initially ordered birding favorite Wingspan Optics Wingcatcher 8x42 weighing 1.5 lbs. for @ $130. When it arrived, I loved the clarity and functions, but, compared to my husband’s older, more-compact binoculars, I knew these were too heavy for me. I returned the Wingcatcher for the lighter Wingspan Spectator (8 x 32) at .94 lbs. who knew that 1/2 lb could make such a difference around my neck? These lighter ones are highly-rated, fog & waterproof, with a lifetime guarantee - and $35 cheaper. For me, the best reasonable binoculars are the ones light enough to effortlessly carry.

 

thank you for this review ! I SO agree that if they are too big and heavy, I know myself and I simply will not take them with me on my excursions.

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Why would you need Binoculars to look at an object at 6 ft out or even 15 feet out like you say. On the Danali tour, you had to stay in the National Park Busses and they had monitors that had a telescoping camera to see the various wildlife. You could not get out of the bus except at the rest stops. They would stop the bus and you had to look out and use your Binocular through the windows to view wildlife from 1/2 mile to 2 miles away. For $50 at Walmart.com, the Bushnell Perma Focus 10X50 is an outstanding buy and product.

 

I guess that we will just have to agree to disagree. No hard feelings.

 

DON

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Will be in Alaska next month and I'm looking for recommendations on budget Friendly, small, lightweight binoculars.

 

I'm well aware that you get what you pay for with optics, but quite frankly I'm not looking to spend $$$ on something I'll maybe use for a week on the cruise and then never again.

Hoping to keep it under $50. Just a basic pair of Bushnell's? Seems like a lot of choices on Amazon. Any recommendations?

 

I bought binoculars that were quite expensive . They are huge and take up a lot of room in my traveling bag. When I booked a cruise with a new TA she gave me binoculars as a gift .They are small,compact and really a good product that I highly recommend.

Konus Action 10x25 Fixed Focus. If I were to buy it it would be $30.

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Any object less than 65 feet distance could be out of focus. After 65 feet to infinity is focused. Why would you be looking at something within 65 feet with Binoculars. I found that I get a clear focus and seeing and spotting whales and wildlife on my Alaska cruise sometimes 2 miles away. I have used these Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 binoculars with my contacts in and contacts out and with the auto focus and have always got a crystal clear view. Read the reviews on this binocular- all rated excellent.

Walmart.com has the cheapest prices on Binoculars and with the Busnell Perma Focus 10X50 if you don't like it and I doubt whether you won't, you can return it to your nearest Walmart store for a refund.

Just ordered these from Walmart and they will be arriving tomorrow.

Going to take them out and about and see how we like them. If not what we need for Alaska, easy enough to return!

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Just ordered these from Walmart and they will be arriving tomorrow.

Going to take them out and about and see how we like them. If not what we need for Alaska, easy enough to return!

Let us know how you like the binoculars purchased on Walmart.com. The Bushnell Perma Focus 10X 50 are the best Binoculars for a Alaska Cruise.

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Let us know how you like the binoculars purchased on Walmart.com. The Bushnell Perma Focus 10X 50 are the best Binoculars for a Alaska Cruise.

 

You keep saying this, and I'm wondering why? Have you tried many others?

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The Bushnell Perma Focus 10X 50 are the best Binoculars for a Alaska Cruise.

 

I strongly disagree with this statement. If your budget is $50, then the BushnellPermaFocus binoculars are good. However,if you can afford an Alaskan cruise, then you can afford more than $50 forbinoculars. If you are reading thisthread, then you are probably interested in seeing animals and willing to spenda bit more. I suggest that you do spend abit more.

Short story…

PermaFocus is not ideal. There isa reason almost all binoculars have manual focus.

Roof prisms are much more compact than porro prisms.

I like 10x50 for Alaska. Mywife does better with 8x42.

Budget binocular = Wingspan 10x42 Voyager/Eagle Scout for $74

Midrange binocular = Hawke 10x50 Endurance ED for $240

Long story…

I remember being on the top deck in front of the glaciers in GlacierBay. Someone was pointing out seals onthe ice. I could see them great. The lady next to me complained she could notmake them out clearly. I traded her binocularsand she was surprised how big of a difference they made. Then her husband used my binoculars and was surprisedat the difference. Since we were sittingstill and everyone was standing around, over a dozen people used my binoculars. And I tried theirs. A little more money on better binoculars wenta long way that day, that cruise, and many years later.

I remember looking at sea otters at 75 yards and seeing their individualwhiskers. It was evening, heavily overcast,and the ship was moving. You need the10x zoom to enlarge the whiskers and you need 50mm to make the most of the lowlight. More than 10x and I start gettingannoyed holding the binoculars still free handed. More than 50mm and they are too heavy, toobig, and/or too expensive.

I remember looking at bald eagles at 30 yards in Ketchikan and seeingthe individual feathers on their face. And looking at a grizzly’s face in the bushes from the Denali bus at 25yards (only his face was visible). Ifyou think a grizzly looks impressive at 25 yards, use binoculars and you will seeamazing details.

I remember heading into the Gulf of Alaska and looking at MountFairweather. Then I saw a small glacierunder it. Then I noticed the glacier wasmoving. Then I used my binoculars andrealized the small glacier was a cruise ship many miles away. It really put the size of Mount Fairweatherinto perspective.

I would suggest 10x50 binoculars for Alaska. You need the 10x because many things will be faraway. But you have to be good or practiceat handling 10x on close objects. Ithink 12x or higher is too much when looking at close animals or free handingon a moving boat. I like 50mm becauselow light can last for hours in Alaska. However,if you are not good at finding/tracking your target with binoculars, then dropdown to 8x. It is better to see a smallerquality image at 8x than to get frustrated with 10x. If you cannot hold heavy binoculars up long,then drop down to 42mm, maybe 32mm. ButI would never drop down to 20-25mm as your only binocular. Being that small, optics quality is far morecritical and going cheap costs you much more. They can be great as a spur-of-the-moment pocket binocular, but a 10x25 canbe frustrating to use at important times.

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If you can afford an Alaskan cruise you can afford to spendmore than $50 on binoculars. Isn’t thata bit presumptuous?

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I strongly disagree with this statement. If your budget is $50, then the BushnellPermaFocus binoculars are good. However,if you can afford an Alaskan cruise, then you can afford more than $50 forbinoculars. If you are reading thisthread, then you are probably interested in seeing animals and willing to spenda bit more. I suggest that you do spend abit more.

 

Short story…

PermaFocus is not ideal. There isa reason almost all binoculars have manual focus.

Roof prisms are much more compact than porro prisms.

I like 10x50 for Alaska. Mywife does better with 8x42.

Budget binocular = Wingspan 10x42 Voyager/Eagle Scout for $74

Midrange binocular = Hawke 10x50 Endurance ED for $240

 

Long story…

I remember being on the top deck in front of the glaciers in GlacierBay. Someone was pointing out seals onthe ice. I could see them great. The lady next to me complained she could notmake them out clearly. I traded her binocularsand she was surprised how big of a difference they made. Then her husband used my binoculars and was surprisedat the difference. Since we were sittingstill and everyone was standing around, over a dozen people used my binoculars. And I tried theirs. A little more money on better binoculars wenta long way that day, that cruise, and many years later.

 

I remember looking at sea otters at 75 yards and seeing their individualwhiskers. It was evening, heavily overcast,and the ship was moving. You need the10x zoom to enlarge the whiskers and you need 50mm to make the most of the lowlight. More than 10x and I start gettingannoyed holding the binoculars still free handed. More than 50mm and they are too heavy, toobig, and/or too expensive.

 

I remember looking at bald eagles at 30 yards in Ketchikan and seeingthe individual feathers on their face. And looking at a grizzly’s face in the bushes from the Denali bus at 25yards (only his face was visible). Ifyou think a grizzly looks impressive at 25 yards, use binoculars and you will seeamazing details.

 

I remember heading into the Gulf of Alaska and looking at MountFairweather. Then I saw a small glacierunder it. Then I noticed the glacier wasmoving. Then I used my binoculars andrealized the small glacier was a cruise ship many miles away. It really put the size of Mount Fairweatherinto perspective.

 

I would suggest 10x50 binoculars for Alaska. You need the 10x because many things will be faraway. But you have to be good or practiceat handling 10x on close objects. Ithink 12x or higher is too much when looking at close animals or free handingon a moving boat. I like 50mm becauselow light can last for hours in Alaska. However,if you are not good at finding/tracking your target with binoculars, then dropdown to 8x. It is better to see a smallerquality image at 8x than to get frustrated with 10x. If you cannot hold heavy binoculars up long,then drop down to 42mm, maybe 32mm. ButI would never drop down to 20-25mm as your only binocular. Being that small, optics quality is far morecritical and going cheap costs you much more. They can be great as a spur-of-the-moment pocket binocular, but a 10x25 canbe frustrating to use at important times.

 

Good post except I would disagree w you one point. Although you have sort of addressed this issue, I would recommend 8x instead of 10 for 2 reasons.

 

1) 10 x are harder to hold still. You have addressed this issue.

 

2) 10x will tend to have a narrower field of vision which will make it harder to find objects.

 

I have a set of Eagle Optics Golden Eagle HD 8x42 that I bought as a manufacturer refurb on Amazon for ~$450. I bought them mainly because the binocs that I brought with me on a to Costa Rica could not focus to anything closer than maybe 20 - 25 feet. Everyone else could see the birds. I could not. My wife does not like carrying around heavy binocs so she uses a set of excellent Pentax 8x28 that cost me ~ $400 although she borrows mine fairly often. They both focus to about 8 feet which I consider a critical but often overlooked parameter.

 

DON

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I strongly disagree with this statement. If your budget is $50, then the BushnellPermaFocus binoculars are good. However,if you can afford an Alaskan cruise, then you can afford more than $50 forbinoculars. If you are reading thisthread, then you are probably interested in seeing animals and willing to spenda bit more. I suggest that you do spend abit more.

 

Short story…

PermaFocus is not ideal. There isa reason almost all binoculars have manual focus.

Roof prisms are much more compact than porro prisms.

I like 10x50 for Alaska. Mywife does better with 8x42.

Budget binocular = Wingspan 10x42 Voyager/Eagle Scout for $74

Midrange binocular = Hawke 10x50 Endurance ED for $240

 

Long story…

I remember being on the top deck in front of the glaciers in GlacierBay. Someone was pointing out seals onthe ice. I could see them great. The lady next to me complained she could notmake them out clearly. I traded her binocularsand she was surprised how big of a difference they made. Then her husband used my binoculars and was surprisedat the difference. Since we were sittingstill and everyone was standing around, over a dozen people used my binoculars. And I tried theirs. A little more money on better binoculars wenta long way that day, that cruise, and many years later.

 

I remember looking at sea otters at 75 yards and seeing their individualwhiskers. It was evening, heavily overcast,and the ship was moving. You need the10x zoom to enlarge the whiskers and you need 50mm to make the most of the lowlight. More than 10x and I start gettingannoyed holding the binoculars still free handed. More than 50mm and they are too heavy, toobig, and/or too expensive.

 

I remember looking at bald eagles at 30 yards in Ketchikan and seeingthe individual feathers on their face. And looking at a grizzly’s face in the bushes from the Denali bus at 25yards (only his face was visible). Ifyou think a grizzly looks impressive at 25 yards, use binoculars and you will seeamazing details.

 

I remember heading into the Gulf of Alaska and looking at MountFairweather. Then I saw a small glacierunder it. Then I noticed the glacier wasmoving. Then I used my binoculars andrealized the small glacier was a cruise ship many miles away. It really put the size of Mount Fairweatherinto perspective.

 

I would suggest 10x50 binoculars for Alaska. You need the 10x because many things will be faraway. But you have to be good or practiceat handling 10x on close objects. Ithink 12x or higher is too much when looking at close animals or free handingon a moving boat. I like 50mm becauselow light can last for hours in Alaska. However,if you are not good at finding/tracking your target with binoculars, then dropdown to 8x. It is better to see a smallerquality image at 8x than to get frustrated with 10x. If you cannot hold heavy binoculars up long,then drop down to 42mm, maybe 32mm. ButI would never drop down to 20-25mm as your only binocular. Being that small, optics quality is far morecritical and going cheap costs you much more. They can be great as a spur-of-the-moment pocket binocular, but a 10x25 canbe frustrating to use at important times.

 

The Busnell's ARE 10x50 or is it the auto focus you don't like!

Mine are arriving today and I will head down to the ocean and see how they work here at home.

Going to Cabela's next week and will look around. May want to get 8X42 for myself and the 10x50 for hubby!

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:loudcry:

If you can afford an Alaskan cruise you can afford to spendmore than $50 on binoculars. Isn’t thata bit presumptuous?

 

I agree! Why spend a ton of money on something you may never use again.

At least with your trip, you are taking photos and making memories!

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The Busnell's ARE 10x50 or is it the auto focus you don't like!

Mine are arriving today and I will head down to the ocean and see how they work here at home.

 

Personally, I do not care for the PermaFocus. But it has its place and its advantages. But it also has disadvantages. If you are someone that has a hard time findingsubjects with binoculars, then PermaFocus may make the experience moreenjoyable because it is one less thing to deal with. But you may be better off going with lowerzoom and/or wider field-of-view. Maybenot. Everyone is different.

 

When you go to Cabela’s, take your Bushnells with you. Get some high-end binoculars and go look outa window into the distance. Findsomething small and detailed like tree branches, leaves, or bushes. Immediately swap to your Bushnells and youwill probably notice a difference. Perhaps thatdifference is worth the upcharge to you? Perhaps not. I think a lot of itis based on how good you are at holding binoculars and how interested you arein seeing the animals closer up. If youare unsteady with binoculars, better optics may not be noticeable. Again, everyone is different.

 

Also, try some other budget binoculars. You may like them better only because theyare roof prism and fit your hands better. Look at one of their stuffed birds from 25 yards with the PermaFocusbinoculars. It will be blurry. How blurry depends on your eyes. Some folks will be fine with that becausethey would rather look at something that close without binoculars. But I would encourage everyone to do both ifsomething sits still long enough. Afteryou have seen your 20th bald eagle of the day, seeing one at 25 yardswith binoculars is an interesting experience.

 

 

But back to the OP’s topic. Ido not disagree that the Bushnell PermaFocus are good budget binocular for $50. You cannot go wrong with them at that price. But I think for $24 more, the manuallyfocused Wingspans are a better value and more versatile. Ionly disagree that the Bushnell PermaFocus “…are the best Binoculars for aAlaska Cruise.” I guarantee a $1000 pairof Swarovski binoculars are noticeably better. In other words, I do not want people to get the impression that BushnellPermaFocus have some kind of magic that makes them “the best”. “The best for $50”? For most people, sure. But not “the best”.

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I did a lot of review-reading on Amazon and initially ordered birding favorite Wingspan Optics Wingcatcher 8x42 weighing 1.5 lbs. for @ $130. When it arrived, I loved the clarity and functions, but, compared to my husband’s older, more-compact binoculars, I knew these were too heavy for me. I returned the Wingcatcher for the lighter Wingspan Spectator (8 x 32) at .94 lbs. who knew that 1/2 lb could make such a difference around my neck? These lighter ones are highly-rated, fog & waterproof, with a lifetime guarantee - and $35 cheaper. For me, the best reasonable binoculars are the ones light enough to effortlessly carry.
For me too, the right trade-off is a good quality 8 x 32. I tried out a couple of 8x40s along with the 8x32. That extra half pound makes a difference in how long I can hold them steady. I was able to use the 8x32 for as long as I wanted.

 

I chose Celestron Trailseeker - it has a very good field of view. (In the lower priced model, Celestron Nature DX, dropping from 42 to 32 gave up more.)

 

The Trailseeker 8x32 is $189 and came with a harness that made it easy to have them handy. Nature DX is a good choice if you want cheaper and are willing to get the 8x42. It's a bit over $100.

 

It never felt like I needed the larger lens for low light in Alaska. The 32 had a bright enough view.

 

Sent from my Pixel using Forums mobile app

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The Busnell's ARE 10x50 or is it the auto focus you don't like!

Mine are arriving today and I will head down to the ocean and see how they work here at home.

Going to Cabela's next week and will look around. May want to get 8X42 for myself and the 10x50 for hubby!

 

Both. One other quick point. Don't ever buy binoculars for someone else. Everyone has to pick their own to make sure that they work for them.

 

DON

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Will be in Alaska next month and I'm looking for recommendations on budget Friendly, small, lightweight binoculars.

 

I'm well aware that you get what you pay for with optics, but quite frankly I'm not looking to spend $$$ on something I'll maybe use for a week on the cruise and then never again.

Hoping to keep it under $50. Just a basic pair of Bushnell's? Seems like a lot of choices on Amazon. Any recommendations?

 

 

I think pretty much any 10X, waterproof, fog proof will suffice for your purposes. I have a Bushnell and a Zen Ray which both did a great job.

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On 4/25/2018 at 2:23 PM, cheone said:

Let us know how you like the binoculars purchased on Walmart.com. The Bushnell Perma Focus 10X 50 are the best Binoculars for a Alaska Cruise.

 

As a wildlife biologist and naturalist, I totally disagree.  After trying numerous binoculars I generally stick with Nikon.  My latest binoculars are the Prostaff 8x42, which run a little over $100.  The 10x50 are ok on a big ship, but if you go out on a smaller boat, e.g. whale watch, they are too “bouncy.”  I generally own 3-4 binoculars at any given time and seldom leave home without one (there’s a set permanently under the seat of my car).  I don’t buy the pricey ones because I have....knocked them off the railing of a boat, dropped them off a cliff, left them in a rental car in Iceland, had them chewed by the dog, etc.

 

i would never buy the Perma Focus for birding, but I suppose they might be ok for hunting.

 

Many small animals in Denali (and some big ones) are within 65 feet of the bus...

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6 hours ago, Saman said:

Hi i'm looking to buy some compact binoculars for our Norway cruise , can anyone give me any tips i have been looking on amazon but i am in Europe so availability could vary , would these be any good, i have been looking for some of the above and not found them. TIA

Bushnell Powerview-Roof 10x 42mm Prismáticos, Unisex, Negro, 10 x 42 mm
 

For general use at sea, most of the ship supplied binoculars I used were 7x35 or 7x50. The first number is the magnification number and for use at sea, 7 is generally considered as being the best compromise between magnification and vibration.

 

However, on cruise ships, if binoculars are held carefully you can get acceptable results with 10x optics. Bushnell are a budget friendly binocular that provide reasonable results. However, in my experience, they are more susceptible to damaged optics from dropping or banging, than more expensive brands.

 

In 40 years at sea, with both European & N/American shipping lines, most of my ships were provided with Bushnell binoculars. 

Edited by Heidi13

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