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Second Thoughts About Flying?


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Surely we must wait for a definitive NTSB report as to what caused the engine failure. What I have heard is "metal fatigue" in a fan blade as a possible cause. Does anyone remember that United DC-10 that suffered a broken fan blade in its tail engine that severed hydraulic lines and led to its emergency landing in Souix City, Iowa? Many survived a miraculous landing that caused the loss of many others.

 

If a fan blade failure, again, due to metal fatigue is found to be the cause of this incident, its time for the FAA to require all airlines to inspect on a very frequent basis those fan blades on their jet engines.

 

I see a disappointing similarity with possible maintenance issues between airlines and cruise lines. Are dry docks being done frequently enough as vessels age to prevent disappointing to the guest issues? Airlines' planes are subject to how many hundreds, maybe thousands, of take-off/landing cycles between their "dry docks"? Maybe more frequent removals from service (Oh, the loss of revenues!) for a thorough inspection would help to make flying safer and prevent the loss of any life due to "metal fatigue", if that indeed is the reason for whatever happened to that engine.

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I've never flown Allegiant, but the bigger question I'm suggesting is, if one airline is "flying under the radar" of the FAA without oversight concern, how does one know other airlines aren't also? I'm simply suggesting deregulation opens the door to safety non-compliance.

 

The fact that metal fatigue has been determined to be the cause of the Southwest fatality, how do you know other planes are not also experiencing metal fatigue? And why did this particular Southwest airplane get to the point where metal fatigue killed a passenger? Don't you want to know the next aircraft you fly on is not on the verge of metal fatigue? How do you know the next airline you choose has an internal control process?

 

SMH.

 

If it is any consolation, the 60 mins report clearly outlined that all of the other major airlines do NOT have the maintenance or accident issues that Allegiant does, so to me this is isolated to Allegiant and their faulty business practices. Avoid Allegiant, and your chances of a safe, accident free flight are increased exponentially.

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Just read a follow up article about yesterday's Southwest's accident. The plane was going 500 mph at 30,000 + feet. After the engine blew and the cabin depressurized, the plane was rapidly brought down to a lower altitude. A passenger commented that despite all this, "the plane was steady as a rock.....I didn't have any fear that it was out of control." It's a testament to the pilots and Boeing that it continued to fly as well as it did.

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I see a disappointing similarity with possible maintenance issues between airlines and cruise lines. Are dry docks being done frequently enough as vessels age to prevent disappointing to the guest issues?

 

Wow.. that's a stretch IMHO! Comparing airline maintenance issues (which may include loss of life), to cruise (perceived) maintenance issues, which may result in a disgruntled guest complaining about some rust on their balcony is crazy!

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I would go so far as to say that she definitely saved a lot of lives... no question.

 

Yes, KroozNut...should have said definitely. ..wrong choice of words...sorry.

I have much respect for the military . My DH has 3 Purple Hearts ftom Vietnam. No substitute for military experience IMHO. Especially combat experience. God Bless our armed forces!

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For the past several years, we've taken the auto train from Virginia to Florida. This year, we decided we had enough and flew home. It was a much better choice. I use a scooter in the airport and I'm always pulled out to be patted down, and so is the scooter, but it's still better than the train.

That pilot did an amazing job of landing that plane in a calm and professional manner. Many people owe their lives to her.

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Southwest Captain Tammie Jo Shults who is being hailed for her cool and calm handling of this emergency has lots of experience under her belt. As a matter of fact she was one of the first female naval combat pilots. The training these ATP pilots go through makes me feel very comfortable in the cabin. My prayers go out to the woman who lost her life and everyone who witnessed this tragedy.

 

 

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I am not a good flyer. I hate heights and have a fear of falling (like a kindred spirit above) but if we didn't fly, we'd never go anywhere. We live in the West where everything is hours and hours of driving away. So Ativan and Sudafed are my friends, and I fly. If I die while flying, so be it.

 

I've told our kids that if I die when we are going/gone somewhere, know I died happy because I was seeing something. I have always valued experiences over things. We're soon to have a new experience and will fly to Japan to get on the Volendam. Can't wait!!!

 

~Robin

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Getting to and from the airport is a larger concern of mine than the actual flight. This tragic incident surely does show the need to keep one's seat belt fastened when on a plane.

 

 

 

Just read a detailed report this morning that said she WAS wearing her seatbelt. Perhaps if she hadn’t been, her whole body would have been sucked out of the plane. (just me speculating).

 

The coroner said she died of severe head trauma and it was apparent that her head hit the side of the plane or the wing. So sad, such a freak accident. You never know.

 

 

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This tragic incident surely does show the need to keep one's seat belt fastened when on a plane.

 

Following the seat belt rules on an airplane is always necessary for safety.

 

 

That being said, I read today that the single casualty on this flight was wearing her seat belt, and was sucked half way out of the aircraft through a blown out window before two guys managed to pull her back in. A nurse onboard administered CPR but she didn't make it. 'Blunt force trauma' is the preliminary cause of death.

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I would go so far as to say that she definitely saved a lot of lives... no question.

 

 

An incredibly able, well trained pilot, She did a GOOD day's work yesterday and is extremely humble about it. Blessings on that lady.

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I am not a good flyer. I hate heights and have a fear of falling (like a kindred spirit above) but if we didn't fly, we'd never go anywhere. We live in the West where everything is hours and hours of driving away. So Ativan and Sudafed are my friends, and I fly. If I die while flying, so be it.

 

I've told our kids that if I die when we are going/gone somewhere, know I died happy because I was seeing something. I have always valued experiences over things. We're soon to have a new experience and will fly to Japan to get on the Volendam. Can't wait!!!

 

~Robin

 

Hello kindred spirit! :D

Yes, flying is a necessary evil for we travel/cruising lovers and we do what we have to do. Have a great cruise!

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Yes, that definitely helped...she had a lot of good military experience.....probably saved a lot of lives!

 

In reality, any FAA or European EASA licenced flightcrew would be able to land this aircraft safely, the emergency itself is fairly standard and trained and correct execution examined every 6 months. Military background has nothing to do with it . However, all respect to the crew as they did what they were trained to do and they did it exemplary. This is why Flightcrew, as well as Ship crew deserve respect. Not for the thousands of flights that are “routine” to the unaware passenger ( although often such flight is anything but), but for the once in a lifetime nightmare scenario where all of the training, studying and responsibility is necessary to keep the passengers and crew safe.

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In reality, any FAA or European EASA licenced flightcrew would be able to land this aircraft safely, the emergency itself is fairly standard and trained and correct execution examined every 6 months. Military background has nothing to do with it . However, all respect to the crew as they did what they were trained to do and they did it exemplary. This is why Flightcrew, as well as Ship crew deserve respect. Not for the thousands of flights that are “routine” to the unaware passenger ( although often such flight is anything but), but for the once in a lifetime nightmare scenario where all of the training, studying and responsibility is necessary to keep the passengers and crew safe.

 

They probably, w ould, could, vs. She DID

 

. , they likeyl c ould and would She Did. :)

 

Let her have her moment of sincere appreciation. NOT that she has indicated a wish for it but She DEserves it, IMO She Earned it. Who would deny a nyone that after having saved so many lives ?

Edited by sail7seas
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My only concern about flying is getting deep vein thrombosis. The seats are so darn close together that you have no space in front of you to stretch out your legs and move around a little. On long distance flights, airlines encourage you to stand up and walk around every few hours. If you are in a middle or window seat, and your seatmates are sleeping or have their tray tables down, how do you accomplish this limited exercise ? I always try to book early and pay the fees to get a bulkhead seat where you have a little more room to stretch out. Otherwise, flying is much safer than driving and few people ever think twice about doing that.

I was a corporate pilot (King Air 200, Citation II), and I had to practice and was FAA tested on engine-out landings, and, even more critical, losing an engine on takeoff. When you are heavy, full fuel, low and slow, and trying to gain altitude, the worst time to lose one is after V1 (go/nogo decision speed) on takeoff. All commercial jets are designed to fly for many hours on one engine. As long as that other engine on the 737 was fully functioning and no flight controls were affected, a safe landing was almost assured. The scary part of this incident was the explosive decompression of the cabin after the engine debris penetrated the cabin. We always practice emergency descents from cruise altitude, and it is perfectly safe, but when you have to do it for real, that really gets your attention. You have to get down to 10,000 ft to allow normal breathing, because the oxygen generators in the overhead only last for 10-15 minutes. So a rapid, but safe descent is needed. Coming down at 5000 ft per minute is a little scary compared to the usual 1500-2000 ft per minute. The plane is designed for that high rate and even more.

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I'm no 'road warrior' but I do have to fly for work (nationally and sometimes internationally) as well as for pleasure. There are a number of things that one can do that help alleviate the less pleasant aspects of flying, such as:

 

-- Get TSA or Global Entry (which includes TSA privileges) to avoid having to take off shoes, take out computer, take out 3-1-1 bag, etc. when going through security. Lines are also usually quite a bit shorter -- but can be long if you travel when all the business travelers tend to travel.

 

-- Don't tote a lot on the plane. I have only a small purse and one bag; the bag goes above leaving the space beneath the seat in front of me relatively open so that I can at least move my legs and feet around a bit.

 

-- Wear compression socks to keep down swelling and reduce risk of DVT. And of course, comfortable loose clothing in layers.

 

-- If you can't sit 'front of plane' at least pay to be able to choose your seat in advance and/or if you're flying on an airline that has it, consider the "economy comfort" or "economy plus" seating with more legroom.

 

-- Eat in the airport before your flight -- quite a few airports have at least one or two decent restaurants now. Much better than what you'll get (or have to purchase) on the plane and eliminates the need to juggle a plate, drink, silverware, etc. on your tray table. If you bring a snack onboard make sure it's easy to manage -- a granola bar, packet of nuts, etc. Not a salad that has to be assembled.

 

-- Noise cancelling earbuds are wonderful. Use them to watch in-flight entertainment or your own entertainment (music, movies). Really helps eliminate the crying babies, loud laughers, etc.

 

-- Bring some back-up entertainment (Kindle, book); can't count how many times my particular in-flight entertainment unit didn't work (or didn't work well).

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Wow.. that's a stretch IMHO! Comparing airline maintenance issues (which may include loss of life), to cruise (perceived) maintenance issues, which may result in a disgruntled guest complaining about some rust on their balcony is crazy!

 

Respectfully, I disagree that my comparison ought to be considered a "stretch". Have you followed, just as an example, the past reports of Amsterdam world cruisers who have witnessed repeated leaking of pipes in the ceilings and buckets in the hallways? This current world cruise, the guests have had issues when water had to be shut off for a period of time due to maintenance requirements. On my December/January Zaandam cruise, a table mate of mine whose cabin was on aft Dolphin Deck (along with others in that area) had several days with no hot water.

 

As homes, autos, and our bodies age, they require more maintenance. Ships and planes do as well.

 

My concern is that dry docking times for HAL ships as they age are too short for the thorough maintenance that might truly be needed to insure the best guest experience.

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