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We are looking at a 10 day cruise between NYC and Montreal this fall. The cruise has 9 different ports of

call with only 1 sea day. We have to decide on the type of cabin from the inside to a veranda. I would like to

consider an inside with the savings to be used for excursions in each of the ports. We are first time cruisers

with Oceania and the ship would be the Insignia. Any help would be appreciated.

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personal choice

depends on what you can live with

I will not do an inside so a C1 works for us

the cabins A to D are all the same size excluding balconies

there are some exceptions but for the most part they are approx 165 sq ft

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Our cabin choice depends on where we are sailing. If we are going to a cold climate we will take a cabin without a balcony, if it is hot we will upgrade to a balcony. We used to do inside but prefer to have a window now. It is personal choice.

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Our cabin choice depends on where we are sailing. If we are going to a cold climate we will take a cabin without a balcony, if it is hot we will upgrade to a balcony. We used to do inside but prefer to have a window now. It is personal choice.

 

 

 

I agree with you no fuss. We do the same thing. Balcony’s nice if hotter climate. Waste of money that can used for tours or toward another cruise

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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We are looking at a 10 day cruise between NYC and Montreal this fall. The cruise has 9 different ports of

call with only 1 sea day. We have to decide on the type of cabin from the inside to a veranda. I would like to

consider an inside with the savings to be used for excursions in each of the ports. We are first time cruisers

with Oceania and the ship would be the Insignia. Any help would be appreciated.

 

I will never book an inside, windowless stateroom. Too claustrophobic, for me.

Go for a veranda. It’s not that much more expensive. And you won’t feel like you are sleeping in a shipping container.

You won’t regret the port views sitting out on your balcony looking at the Fall colors.

Whatever you decide, enjoy your cruise. :)

Edited by Kingofcool1947

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I will never book an inside, windowless stateroom. Too claustrophobic, for me.

Go for a veranda. It’s not that much more expensive. And you won’t feel like you are sleeping in a shipping container.

You won’t regret the port views sitting out on your balcony looking at the Fall colors.

Whatever you decide, enjoy your cruise. :)

 

Actually on Oceania many times the difference between inside and a veranda can be thousands of dollars.

 

I've been in everything except Owners or Vista. I probably wouldn't book an inside on the R ships but would on the larger ones.

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If you want to check out a specific cabin have a look at the cabin thread on the Azamara boards. Here is a fantastic spreadsheet showing most of the cabins with pros and cons of each. As the Azamara and Oceania R ships have the same cabins it is very useful.

Rosalyn

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For a general "view" of cabin layouts you can also go to cruisemapper.com

 

As to balcony cabins being a waste of money in a certain season, that is also a "personal choice" IMO.

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Our budget will only allow for an inside stateroom, and we are happy with that unless a great deal pops up for an upgrade late on. We have cruised anywhere from an inside to a concierge and have never been disappointed. Looks like you will be on Insignia and the only category I'd avoid is obstructed view E. We were once "upgraded" to an E, and the lack of a sofa and 143 sq feet vs. 160 in the inside, makes a big difference. The Cat A and B are both 173 sq ft. But to save money for the next cruise and pay for excursions, it's worth every penny to stay in an inside. If you like you can also give your TA a budget and hope that if a good deal on a veranda or you can pay less for it. But that's always a big IF. Best wishes.

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I'm late to post, but here goes anyway: We almost always book an inside cabin. The difference in price makes it an easy choice for us. Besides, we're not claustrophobic, and don't spend much time in the cabin anyway. The room size isn't much different from the veranda size when you take away some square footage for the veranda, which we don't use all that much anyway. One thing I would (and do) enjoy about cruising in a veranda is that you can order room service breakfast and enjoy it out there.

 

If I want to see what's going on outside, I just go up or down a deck (occasionally 2), walk outside, and look. There used to be a bow camera on one of the TV channels; that helped, too. (I assume it's still there, but not sure). Most of the inside cabins are mid-ship, which we find very convenient. Most are also not that far from an elevator (and no, it's not noisy). We hear nothing inside, whereas some veranda cabins might be a little noisier due to people walking down the aisles. The cabin attendants are the same ones who clean the other rooms nearby, and the service is excellent. Most of the time while sailing, there's not much to see, so if I crave ocean air, I just go out of the cabin. We sometimes get calls closer to sail date from Oceania (through TA) asking if we'd be willing to spend some money on a veranda, with the price being much less than what a veranda originally cost. Sometimes we say yes; sometimes no. Mostly, though, we just prefer to save our money to use in exploring the ports, or going on more cruises, so an inside cabin works for us.

Edited by roothy123

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We hear nothing inside, whereas some veranda cabins might be a little noisier due to people walking down the aisles.

Roothie, would you please give an example of an inside cabin which does not share the same hallway with the outside cabins opposite? :confused:

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Roothie, would you please give an example of an inside cabin which does not share the same hallway with the outside cabins opposite? :confused:

 

Actually I've seen some, but they're not for guests. I took a wrong turn out of one of internal laundries(the ones with a door to the hallway that goes to both port and starboard) and went into an officer crew area. They were inside rooms. After about 3 steps I'm thinking, "something doesn't look right, everything is plain"

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imo 165 square feet for any cabin is tiny. It wouldn’t work for me. But you have to do what works for your budget. I like some would find it much to small and would consider another more cost effective cruise line.

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Actually I've seen some, but they're not for guests. I took a wrong turn out of one of internal laundries(the ones with a door to the hallway that goes to both port and starboard) and went into an officer crew area. They were inside rooms. After about 3 steps I'm thinking, "something doesn't look right, everything is plain"

 

I guess that the takeaway here is that unless Oceania starts renting out crew cabins to passengers, all of the cabins are effected equally by cabin noise in the hallways outside of them ;p

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imo 165 square feet for any cabin is tiny. It wouldn’t work for me. But you have to do what works for your budget. I like some would find it much to small and would consider another more cost effective cruise line.

Being able to cruise Oceania and enjoy all the cruise line offers, and duck the higher cost but extra space a larger cabin offers, an inside cabin is highly cost effective! I may not have the budget others may have but I know a deal when I see experience it. Wouldn't be able to cruise O otherwise.

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imo 165 square feet for any cabin is tiny. It wouldn’t work for me. But you have to do what works for your budget. I like some would find it much to small and would consider another more cost effective cruise line.

we have been in smaller cabins

 

You just make it work if that is what your budget allows

 

not everyone can afford a suite or wants to sail on a mass market behemoth

 

 

YMMV

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I would go for an inside. On a fall New England cruise it will be dark shortly after leaving most ports. On your sea day you will be too far from any cost to enjoy the view. Insignia has nice indoor and outdoor places to view from if there is still day light as you leave ports. We like to use the public area of the ship which are roomy and only use the cabin to sleep and change clothes so don't worry about a lot of space.

We did this cruise early in Oct. The weather in New England was low 70s but in the St Lawrence it was mid 50's and windy - not good for balcony relaxing.

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Being able to cruise Oceania and enjoy all the cruise line offers, and duck the higher cost but extra space a larger cabin offers, an inside cabin is highly cost effective! I may not have the budget others may have but I know a deal when I see experience it. Wouldn't be able to cruise O otherwise.

 

Same applies to me. I'd go for a veranda if the difference in price weren't so great. But on our upcoming 11 day cruise, the difference between our F inside cabin and the lowest-priced veranda (cruise only fare) was $1800 per person. I think that's nuts.

 

OK, OK, I was wrong - the inside cabins DO share one wall with a corridor! But it's kind of nice ducking into your own little private foursome space!

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OK, OK, I was wrong - the inside cabins DO share one wall with a corridor! But it's kind of nice ducking into your own little private foursome space!

 

212133.jpg

What I believe that this poster is speaking about is that some of the inside cabins open onto a hallway which runs across the ship rather than the two "main" corridors which run from the front of the ship to the back.

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I would go for an inside. On a fall New England cruise it will be dark shortly after leaving most ports. On your sea day you will be too far from any cost to enjoy the view. Insignia has nice indoor and outdoor places to view from if there is still day light as you leave ports. We like to use the public area of the ship which are roomy and only use the cabin to sleep and change clothes so don't worry about a lot of space.

We did this cruise early in Oct. The weather in New England was low 70s but in the St Lawrence it was mid 50's and windy - not good for balcony relaxing.

 

Don’t you people get claustaphopic in an inside stateroom that is always dark and without sunlight? Doesn’t that screw up your internal clock ie. no sunlight?

Enjoy your cruise.

Edited by Kingofcool1947

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My sister who prefers cheaper accommodation and more frequent trips says that the secret is to put on the tv channel showing the bow of the ship.

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My sister who prefers cheaper accommodation and more frequent trips says that the secret is to put on the tv channel showing the bow of the ship.

 

I will have to give ithat a try next time.(y):tropical-drink:

Could save thousands of $$ .:)

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Our budget will only allow for an inside stateroom, and we are happy with that unless a great deal pops up for an upgrade late on. We have cruised anywhere from an inside to a concierge and have never been disappointed. Looks like you will be on Insignia and the only category I'd avoid is obstructed view E. We were once "upgraded" to an E, and the lack of a sofa and 143 sq feet vs. 160 in the inside, makes a big difference. The Cat A and B are both 173 sq ft. But to save money for the next cruise and pay for excursions, it's worth every penny to stay in an inside. If you like you can also give your TA a budget and hope that if a good deal on a veranda or you can pay less for it. But that's always a big IF. Best wishes.

Do you mean that C1 and C2 are 173 sq ft I hope so, that means I have just gained 8 sq feet on my cabin booking from the 165 sq ft quoted, I can bring more clothes!!

Rosalyn

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Do you mean that C1 and C2 are 173 sq ft I hope so, that means I have just gained 8 sq feet on my cabin booking from the 165 sq ft quoted, I can bring more clothes!!

Rosalyn

the C1 is 165 sq ft

 

I do not find them too small

 

lots of storage

 

The A & B cabins are the same size inside

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