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ekatiel

Jeans in the dining room and other last minute attire questions

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For some inexplicable reason the dress code police always seem to end up at one of two destinations. On line or charity shops.

 

For some reason they always seem to interpret the problem as inconsideration to other cruisers (aka them) or a money issue. It is as though they cannot fathom any other reason.

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Online isn't always a bad thing;but agreed that the charity shops suggestion is implying they're cheap.

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Jeans are not smart casual either.

 

Complete bullocks.

 

Good quality jeans, without holes and fitting, instead of bagging around your body like lots of Americans prefer, are perfectly fine in any restaurant Worldwide, Including HAL.

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A few want to see just how far they can lower the bar.
I have never met anyone on board who deliberatly was seeing how far they can lower the bar. It makes no sense to me to make any assumption other than people who are dressed more casually are doing so for the reasons several people have outlined in this thread: their personal preference and the fact that the rules allow for it.

 

The dress code police are a legend /authority in their own minds..and only exist on the HAL boards here.
I don't think that that is correct. Perhaps you could say that this particular cruise line forum on cruise critic has a larger than average continent of rude advocates for old cruising traditions, but some can be found in other forums as well.

 

 

This message may have been entered via voice recognition. Please excuse any typos.

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I would recommend against jeans in Alaska solely because you want clothing that can dry quickly there and jeans don’t.
I understand what you are saying, but we're talking about the dining room, and it generally doesn't rain inside. :)

 

I'm also not convinced that drying time is the biggest consideration vis a vis what to wear on some excursions. For example, we're taking the Tracy Arm excursion. I'm sure the Allen Marine tour boats are in great condition, but they're subject to typical, rough Alaska weather, and they're not luxury yachts. My experience is that such boats generally aren't big on cloth-upholstered cushions and fine-milled wood appointments. Consequently, I want to wear pants made of a durable material, that won't get readily damaged by a rough area of the ship that I lean against. I've had some pants made of a more canvas-like material in the past that would be perfect, but I don't have any of those pants in my closet today, so the next best thing is denim.

 

Complete bullocks. Good quality jeans, without holes and fitting, instead of bagging around your body like lots of Americans prefer, are perfectly fine in any restaurant Worldwide, Including HAL.
I think color also matters. I recently purchased two pairs of jeans, one blue, one black. The black jeans, since they're new, look quite nice, nicer perhaps than some of the pairs of slacks I was planning to bring aboard.

 

It does beg the question, though, whether I should just wear the jeans to dinner and wear the slacks on the excursion, not caring what damage to the pants may occur. :)

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As a seasoned cruiser I knew this thread would evoke some ire. Let me be clear. We are not interested in breaking any rules. That is why I asked. We are, however, limited in luggage, and I'd rather not buy my ever-growing teenage son a ton of button down shirts and dress pants that he will quite literally wear once, if I don't have to. Thank you to those of you who simply stated HAL's policy without interjecting your opinion. The rest of you are more than welcome to give us the stink eye when they let my 13 year old into the dining room wearing jeans and a long sleeve t-shirt. I will smile and tell you to have a nice cruise :).

 

Hey Katie, love your attitude. Have a great cruise.

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I believe that most of the style police drive to the pier with as much baggage as they can fit in their vehicle for a 7 day Carribean cruise and then criticise those that have to fly (sometimes for 24+ hours) with a limit of one suitcase per person for a 30 day cruise. So many cruisers on this board only ever cruise in the Carribean from Ft Lauderdale, I doubt they know how difficult it is to pack what is required for a couple of months into one suitcase.

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Question as this thread seems to be a lot about jeans. My 15yo son has Aspergers & doesn’t like the feel of collared shirts (there aren’t any age appropriate polo shirts that I’ve found here in Australia). Will he be able to enter the MDR with pants and a

T-Shirt? He will look neat & tidy. He may wear a collared shirt (not buttoned up) over a T-Shirt.

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He will be fine, especially with a collared shirt over a TShirt. There are no requirements that the shirt be buttoned to the neck.

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Question as this thread seems to be a lot about jeans. My 15yo son has Aspergers & doesn’t like the feel of collared shirts (there aren’t any age appropriate polo shirts that I’ve found here in Australia). Will he be able to enter the MDR with pants and a

T-Shirt? He will look neat & tidy. He may wear a collared shirt (not buttoned up) over a T-Shirt.

This should be fine with the cruise line. T shirts are allowed as smart casual.

 

 

Sent from my SM-G955F using Forums mobile app

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I believe that most of the style police drive to the pier with as much baggage as they can fit in their vehicle for a 7 day Carribean cruise and then criticise those that have to fly (sometimes for 24+ hours) with a limit of one suitcase per person for a 30 day cruise.

That may be the case for some of them. Others might be small people unaware of how much bulkier is clothing for larger people. Still others may be unaware that there are various affordability and cost effectiveness concerns that others care about. However, I think all of those are still a lot rarer than those who aren't ignorant of the practicalities but simply don't care, and instead simply want things to be as they want them to be regardless of what the cruise line or anyone else says.

 

This message may have been drafted using voice recognition. Please forgive any typos.

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I cannot remember the last time we went on a cruise. Only a cruise. Or that the cruise was the main event. We do a fair amount of independent land travel. Cruises are typically add ons and are often bought last minute while we are on a land tour. More often than not we do not plan to take a specific cruise. We hope that a good offer comes up from a port near where we happen to be travelling. It is why, more often than not, we show up with only our usual carry on bags.

 

I believe that the mass market cruise lines will, in the not too distant future, follow the path of most of the premium lines and eliminate formal/gala nights altogether. Perhaps not for the world cruises but certainly for the 7,14,21 day trips. I think the writing is on the wall.

Edited by iancal

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...but agreed that the charity shops suggestion is implying they're cheap.

Shopping in second-hand stores isn't 'cheap'; it's smart when looking for something that will not be worn much. Second-hand shops only accept clothes that are in fashion, clean & in good condition, and are likely to be sold.

 

I have picked up some lovely clothes over the years in second-hand shops. Some were cruise-worthy evening (not formals) clothes for as little as $8; others cost up to $20.

 

That quality, and those prices, are worth looking at if trying to dress children who will outgrow them before the season is over---even for real life.

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I believe that most of the style police drive to the pier with as much baggage as they can fit in their vehicle for a 7 day Carribean cruise and then criticise those that have to fly (sometimes for 24+ hours) with a limit of one suitcase per person for a 30 day cruise. So many cruisers on this board only ever cruise in the Carribean from Ft Lauderdale, I doubt they know how difficult it is to pack what is required for a couple of months into one suitcase.

I don't know if I'm a member of the so-called 'style police' or not, but I do know that I can't manage more than one suitcase.

I fly to ports, including those on far-flung continents, for cruises ranging in temperatures from very hot & humid to frigid Antarctica on the same cruise. For periods up to 39 days (so far).

 

I have separate wardrobes for daytime and evening, in (a-hem) larger sizes).

I know for a fact that dressing appropriately for the occasion can be done, if one wants to.

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It is not just packing for a few months. It is also about how and where you travel. We certainly do not want to lug, nor can we, filled to the brim 26 inch suitcases onto trains, ferries, lift the in and out of rental cars or carry them up two flights of stairs. We started to cut down based on necessity. It soon changed to doing based to ease of travel and preference after a trip or two.

 

For many this is not just about how long they travel. It is about where they travel, how they travel, and what they can physically handle on their own.

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I don't know if I'm a member of the so-called 'style police' or not, but I do know that I can't manage more than one suitcase.

I fly to ports, including those on far-flung continents, for cruises ranging in temperatures from very hot & humid to frigid Antarctica on the same cruise. For periods up to 39 days (so far).

 

I have separate wardrobes for daytime and evening, in (a-hem) larger sizes).

I know for a fact that dressing appropriately for the occasion can be done, if one wants to.

 

Ruth, you are absolutely, positively spot on here. Also, your comments about charity shops are on the money ... no pun intended. When people suggest that to cruisers not wanting to buy an item that they might never use again, they are being helpful not snarky.

 

(By the way, shortly after we were married my husband took me on a business trip to Europe that we added two weeks of vacation onto. We were going to be attending business dinners, sightseeing tours, etc. As I prepared to pack, he wisely told me “you can take anything that you can carry your self! Call Tatian by the way, shortly after we were married my husband took me on a business trip to Europe that we added two weeks of vacation onto. We were going to be attending business dinners, sightseeing tours, etc. As I prepared to pack, he wisely told me “you can take anything that you can carry yourself!’ Since then I have always been able to pack everything I need for all locations in one suitcase. It can be done without a lot of effort!

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We have just booked our 7th cruise with Holland America. I remember doing so much research prior to our first cruise about clothing and what was permitted. We have 4 children and have to fly so are limited to how much luggage we can take. (and are willing to take!!) Our first cruise I packed numerous dressy clothes for all of us for the dining room. I think maybe we wore 1/4 of what we took. I stressed about keeping the clothing police happy. I must say, after that cruise, we scaled way back and now travel carry on only! We do not care what others think and find we often chose to eat at the buffet many evenings. We take dockers and a golf shirt for our sons and a sundress for our daughter incase we do decide to go to the dining room a time or two. It is a fancy dining room and we wouldn't feel comfortable in jeans and t shirts but we have seen others even in tattered jean shorts and t shirts. Wear what you are comfortable in and enjoy your trip!

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Your boys will need a collared shirt. Tee shirt (short or long sleeved) are not allowed.

 

The Main Dining Room on HAL is considered to be a fine dining restaurant by HAL.

 

In the dining room you will have white table clothes, china, and fresh flowers on every table. Service will be impeccable.

 

 

This. ^^^^

 

The following was shared with me by a friend whose husband is a bridge officer: It's a very appreciated sign of respect for the ship, crew and officers when passengers dress well.

Edited by Boatdrill

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Agree. We think that the entire clothes discussion is much ado about nothing. Who really reads or cares about all the comments about attire? I would suggest very, very few. And an even smaller number of cruisers actually bother reading this post. It is akin to spitting in the wind.

 

When we started traveling with our children there was one rule which we both have always followed. You pack it, you carry it. It worked wonders with our daughter.

Edited by iancal

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It is not just packing for a few months. It is also about how and where you travel. We certainly do not want to lug, nor can we, filled to the brim 26 inch suitcases onto trains, ferries, lift the in and out of rental cars or carry them up two flights of stairs.
This is a good point. We could splurge and have a black car take us to the airport, but Atlanta traffic is so bad that it would take twice as long as taking mass transit. So we have to be able to maneuver our luggage out of the parking garage, through the turnstiles, up onto the platform, and then into the train, being sure to have a place for it so others can use the train for commuting to work.

 

You literally never know the path others have taken to get to where you personally encounter them.

 

Who really reads or cares about all the comments about attire? I would suggest very, very few. And an even smaller number of cruisers actually bother reading this post. It is akin to spitting in the wind.
Perhaps, but I think you're not being fair to the folks that other posters have referred to as the "style police". I don't doubt their sincerity. They really do believe what they post, and care very much about others abiding by their preferences. They may be way off-base, but I wouldn't doubt that they think that they're in the right.

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Exactly. Those people who cannot seem to understand why anyone would travel with carry on only should try running for a train in Italy when the elevator is usually broken. You need to go up and down the steps of the subway in order to get to the next platform. Then hoist your bag on to the rail car and/or up into the baggage area. Or lifting you bag in and out of fast ferry speed boats or long tail boats in Thailand in order to get to your destination.

 

It is not always airport baggage carts, taxis, porters, four star plus hotels, or the ability to check your bags.

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Exactly. Those people who cannot seem to understand why anyone would travel with carry on only should try running for a train in Italy when the elevator is usually broken. You need to go up and down the steps of the subway in order to get to the next platform. Then hoist your bag on to the rail car and/or up into the baggage area. Or lifting you bag in and out of fast ferry speed boats or long tail boats in Thailand in order to get to your destination.

 

It is not always airport baggage carts, taxis, porters, four star plus hotels, or the ability to check your bags.

 

So true iancal, we are both in our mid 70’s and when we travel 24+ hours to get to the other wide of the world, we don't just go on a cruise, we see and do as much as we can. That includes trains, planes, coaches, ferries and foot. Last time it was for 10 weeks which included a 22 day cruise, therefore 4 gala nights. We wore the basic HAL suggestion. Collared shirt and slacks for DH and slacks and glittery top for me.

For some, the Gala nights seem to be the highlight of their cruise, not for us. It is just another meal with covered chairs and an extra course on the menu. We are not complaining, HAL is what we choose and we are happy. It seems that the style police are the ones that are not happy that we don't lug a tux and ballgown around for 10 weeks to wear on just 4 nights.

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To each his or her own;I do dress up-maybe not to evening gown and tux levels(sorry fashion police) but there has been a lot of "this is special." It is;sorry,it WAS..we're not in the 19th century anymore

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I do dress up-maybe not to evening gown and tux levels(sorry fashion police) ....

There is quite a range between 'gown and tux' and the smart casual requested by the cruise line.

 

Gala nights are the only nights that some people can bring themselves up to even the smart casual level. Some people can't even manage it then. That's more of what you call the 'fashion police' are referring to.

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