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Is cruising value for money?

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DH and I have cruised twice and have a 3rd planned. All completely different experiences. The first time was on HAL, just the 2 of us for 7 days. (This is the cruise everything now has to live up to! lol) This passed Christmas, we took my 2 boys and DH's father for 12 days on RCL. Our next cruise is a charter with friends. The biggest "value" for us was in visiting new places, trying new things and having complete down time. We ate when we wanted, slept as long as we wanted, and met some incredible people. Having DH all to myself and being waited on hand and foot for the duration was priceless! I honestly think the value is in what you want out of your experience.

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So back to the original question, are we getting value for money when compared to other holidays?

 

The only people who can truly answer your question are you and your wife. Some things to consider, however, are:

 

1. You only have to unpack and pack one time.

2. You only 1 check-in and one check-out regardless of how long the vacation is.

3. Virtually all costs are taken care of right at the start (e.g. no paying for meals every day)

4. You don't have to do any driving, cooking, etc.

5. You have various entertainment venues every night that you can walk to.

6. Many other things that you will probably think of on your own.

 

You may find that you enjoy the heck out of cruising and want to continue doing it as much as you can but you may also find that it's "okay but not for us" and you may find that it's not at all what you expected. In any event, take it as an experience that you were willing to try and go on from there!

 

In any event, I hope you find it to be a worthwhile expenditure and worth repeating!

 

Tom

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We have done Celebrity 2 times and would sail with them again. Our first was in Concierge class cabin and the 2nd we tried Aqua class. We found concierge class to be not really worth the extra bucks over a regular verandah. As for aqua class we did think the designated restaurant Blu was just ok on our particular sailing (I know some folks love Blu) but unless we felt the perks made up for the difference in price we would probably just choose a regular verandah. JMHO. Happy Planning

 

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Most of the cruises I've taken are closer to home, leaving either out of San Francisco, Los Angeles or Seattle. SF is an hour away, Los Angeles 6-8 hours. Seattle was a 12 hour drive and I have driven it twice. I don't believe I could have done a similar trip for less, so yes I found them to be a good value.

 

The 2 cruise I've done further away (New England and the British Isles) were pretty expensive when you add in air fare and the pre-cruise hotel stays. Could I have gone to the UK for less? Sure, but I couldn't have visited 9 separate ports. Well, I guess I could have if I added a week or two extra. But, that would have added hotel and meal costs. Not to mention the planes, trains and automobiles required to get from one place to the other. And we would have been exhausted. Same in New England.

 

In the end, to me, one huge factor in determining "value" is what I get for my money, regardless of the cost. I mean, if I never go anywhere ever again I can say I've been to England, Ireland and Scotland. It was all so amazing. And worth every penny spent.

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I think the biggest difference between the two is something that has been only slightly mentioned.

 

You booked Concierge class on the cruise, which has greatly increased the cost.

 

Now when you compare that to your Disney stay, you need to think of it in terms of hotel accommodations. While no hotels near Disney are "cheap" I would compare the cruise room you have to one of the high-mid Disney rooms. Those $300-400 a night ones. If you would be comfortable in a lower end hotel, then you probably don't need that class of cruise room.

 

While people mentioned food not being as good as it once was, I won't disagree on that point, but this is your first time cruising so you don't have the ability to compare it! I have found the food at least adequate on every line, you won't ever starve. In truth, the extra pay restaurants and the NCL Haven restaurant, yeah.. I won't ever spend the money on extras like that again because it wasn't much different and in truth, worse than I could have gotten on land IMO.

 

I have never really been able to find as much value in a land vacation as a cruise. When we go on a land trip, we try to find value, but we are on vacation so that kind of goes out the window with me and DH and a $150 dinner isn't unusual for us for 2 people. Food alone can easily add up to another $1000 on a week long trip for 2 people it seems.

 

DH and I also tend to be pretty easy to entertain, give us playing cards, other card games or books or just a place to take a hike and we are happy people. But, we can also easily spend another $2-300 a day on adventure and one chance things.

 

Our last land trip was actually to Niagara Falls where my husband had never been for a concert I wanted to go see in Buffalo. We had fun, but in all honesty for the cost including the concert we could have gone on a 7 day cruise and we went for 3 days with how much things add up.

 

This is just about the money wise "value" though. I can happily say me and DH have a philosophy of money is needed to pay bills and has no value over that to us, and experiences are what we really value.

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For North Americans who enjoy a week or so having someone else do the cooking and cleaning up, cruising is a great value --- much the same way that buying clothes made in Southeast Asia gives more product in your closet than focusing on "made in America labels".

 

When a large part of the "product" you buy represents the efforts of people nowhere near as well paid as you , you will feel the benefit of income disparity.

 

If you travel in the US, you do not experience that great disparity.

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This is such an interesting question! I have pondered this myself because my family will be going on a Baltics cruise next year that will eat up 9 days of the 3 weeks we planned to spend in Europe. A cruise was probably not my first choice, but it was the compromise I reached with my extended family because we had all agreed to meet up in Europe for a week or so and a cruise was the consensus choice as being the most accommodating of everybody's different travel styles.

 

I answer the question in two ways:

 

1) Subjective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would otherwise spend in the same amount of time in Europe? What was my opportunity cost?

 

2) Objective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would have had to pay to get a similar vacation on land rather than a ship?

 

First, the cost of the cruise. We got a family balcony, the cheapest cabin I thought my family (2 adults + 2 young teens) could be comfortable in without feeling deprived, and I expect to buy 1 excursion to St. Petersburg but DIY it everywhere else with public transport. Our onboard extras will be moderate as we have fairly simple tastes. However, I will buy things I think my family will use and enjoy and also give the kids some spending money and of course you have to factor in gratuities. My all-in estimated cost is $12,000 for 9 days, which works out to estimated average daily cost of $1,333 per day.

 

For subjective value, I asked myself what I would be doing with the 9 days if not cruising. The answer is easy. At present we will spend slightly less than 2 weeks in Reykjavik, Paris and Copenhagen. If I had 9 more days I would probably skip Copenhagen and split the time between any 2 of London, Berlin or Amsterdam. However, when we do city travel, we travel fairly cheaply: airbnb in the centre of town, 2/3 meals cooked or eaten at home, walk or public transport, DIY sightsee rather than tours and spend our entertainment dollars on a judicious mix of expensive and free activities. Our main goal, other than some of the must-sees (e.g., Louvre, Eiffel Tower) is for the family to get comfortable in a new city and try to get into the rhythm of living there. So the cost of such a fairly simple vacation would be much less. My estimated average daily cost in any of London, Berlin or Stockholm, with airfare or train fare for 1 additional destination is $700 a day.

 

Nevertheless, this is not an apples to apples comparison as the inputs vary greatly. On a cruise, I get way more service, way more entertainment, way more restaurant food and way more countries and stops in. An objective comparison would take all of that into account.

 

So in assessing objective value, I compare the cruise cost to the cost of a land-based vacation with a similar level of service, entertainment, restaurant dining, unlimited booze, etc. And here is my calculation:

 

1. Summer rates for a standard room in a low-end 5-star hotel in central Berlin/London or Stockholm, i.e., 24-hour service, onsite spa/fitness/pool, dining and other options onsite, housekeeping, turndown service. $700 a night.

 

2. Restaurant dining for 4 people on the low to medium end, 3 meals a day and snacks, plus alcohol for 2 adults based on average drinker. $400 a day.

 

3. Combination of one-way ferry / airfare / train / transfers to each of the ports of call (Warnemunde, Stockholm, Talinn, St. Petersburg) in the same timeframe. About $500 per destination or total $2000. Average daily cost for 9 days: $225 a day.

 

4. Entertainment (shows, escape room, ropes course, museums we would have visited from the cruise etc.) and 1 tour in St. Petersburg for 4 people based on 1-2 paid activities per day (we like to take it easy). $250 a day.

 

Total estimated average daily cost for similar land-based vacation: $1,575 a day.

 

Subjectively, I would say cruising is bad value compared to what I would have chosen simply because I would make much cheaper choices left to my own devices, but objectively it is pretty good value compared to what it would have cost me to get the same approximate level of vacation on land.

 

Obviously, each type of vacation has intangibles that are not valued. E.g., what price do you put on the pleaure of seeing the ocean everywhere you turn? Or getting to know people from all over the world? Or letting your kids roam free knowing they are relatively safe onboard the ship? How do you value the enjoyment of buying your food fresh in the open market and chatting up locals? How does an ocean sunset compare to the Eiffel Tower lit at night?

 

Like everyone else said, there are costs and benefits, and it's both good and bad value, depending on what you're looking for.

 

Perhaps after I've cruised for the first time, I will fall in love with the cruise life and decide that I DO enjoy that kind of service-intensive vacation and decide that it's GREAT value. :)

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If you have a good idea of what a cruise entails, and are willing to pay the asked for price, then it is good value FOR YOU. And really, that is all that matters.

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What a fabulous way of putting it:D I often think people don't include opportunity cost in the equation, or the intangibles you mention that are hard to put a price on. It's a big part of why even though the numbers may not make sense at first glance, a cruise can be a great value (or even a lousy value, depending on the individual).

 

I hope you enjoy your cruise (even if it's not your first choice;))!

 

This is such an interesting question! I have pondered this myself because my family will be going on a Baltics cruise next year that will eat up 9 days of the 3 weeks we planned to spend in Europe. A cruise was probably not my first choice, but it was the compromise I reached with my extended family because we had all agreed to meet up in Europe for a week or so and a cruise was the consensus choice as being the most accommodating of everybody's different travel styles.

 

I answer the question in two ways:

 

1) Subjective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would otherwise spend in the same amount of time in Europe? What was my opportunity cost?

 

2) Objective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would have had to pay to get a similar vacation on land rather than a ship?

 

First, the cost of the cruise. We got a family balcony, the cheapest cabin I thought my family (2 adults + 2 young teens) could be comfortable in without feeling deprived, and I expect to buy 1 excursion to St. Petersburg but DIY it everywhere else with public transport. Our onboard extras will be moderate as we have fairly simple tastes. However, I will buy things I think my family will use and enjoy and also give the kids some spending money and of course you have to factor in gratuities. My all-in estimated cost is $12,000 for 9 days, which works out to estimated average daily cost of $1,333 per day.

 

For subjective value, I asked myself what I would be doing with the 9 days if not cruising. The answer is easy. At present we will spend slightly less than 2 weeks in Reykjavik, Paris and Copenhagen. If I had 9 more days I would probably skip Copenhagen and split the time between any 2 of London, Berlin or Amsterdam. However, when we do city travel, we travel fairly cheaply: airbnb in the centre of town, 2/3 meals cooked or eaten at home, walk or public transport, DIY sightsee rather than tours and spend our entertainment dollars on a judicious mix of expensive and free activities. Our main goal, other than some of the must-sees (e.g., Louvre, Eiffel Tower) is for the family to get comfortable in a new city and try to get into the rhythm of living there. So the cost of such a fairly simple vacation would be much less. My estimated average daily cost in any of London, Berlin or Stockholm, with airfare or train fare for 1 additional destination is $700 a day.

 

Nevertheless, this is not an apples to apples comparison as the inputs vary greatly. On a cruise, I get way more service, way more entertainment, way more restaurant food and way more countries and stops in. An objective comparison would take all of that into account.

 

So in assessing objective value, I compare the cruise cost to the cost of a land-based vacation with a similar level of service, entertainment, restaurant dining, unlimited booze, etc. And here is my calculation:

 

1. Summer rates for a standard room in a low-end 5-star hotel in central Berlin/London or Stockholm, i.e., 24-hour service, onsite spa/fitness/pool, dining and other options onsite, housekeeping, turndown service. $700 a night.

 

2. Restaurant dining for 4 people on the low to medium end, 3 meals a day and snacks, plus alcohol for 2 adults based on average drinker. $400 a day.

 

3. Combination of one-way ferry / airfare / train / transfers to each of the ports of call (Warnemunde, Stockholm, Talinn, St. Petersburg) in the same timeframe. About $500 per destination or total $2000. Average daily cost for 9 days: $225 a day.

 

4. Entertainment (shows, escape room, ropes course, museums we would have visited from the cruise etc.) and 1 tour in St. Petersburg for 4 people based on 1-2 paid activities per day (we like to take it easy). $250 a day.

 

Total estimated average daily cost for similar land-based vacation: $1,575 a day.

 

Subjectively, I would say cruising is bad value compared to what I would have chosen simply because I would make much cheaper choices left to my own devices, but objectively it is pretty good value compared to what it would have cost me to get the same approximate level of vacation on land.

 

Obviously, each type of vacation has intangibles that are not valued. E.g., what price do you put on the pleaure of seeing the ocean everywhere you turn? Or getting to know people from all over the world? Or letting your kids roam free knowing they are relatively safe onboard the ship? How do you value the enjoyment of buying your food fresh in the open market and chatting up locals? How does an ocean sunset compare to the Eiffel Tower lit at night?

 

Like everyone else said, there are costs and benefits, and it's both good and bad value, depending on what you're looking for.

 

Perhaps after I've cruised for the first time, I will fall in love with the cruise life and decide that I DO enjoy that kind of service-intensive vacation and decide that it's GREAT value. :)

 

I've never seen an escape room on a cruise:confused:. That seems like a fun idea and a good possible use of non-revenue generating space (not sure how much space they take), plus an indoor activity if weather is bad. I think we would sign up for one on a sea day if it was a reasonable price.

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What a fabulous way of putting it:D I often think people don't include opportunity cost in the equation, or the intangibles you mention that are hard to put a price on. It's a big part of why even though the numbers may not make sense at first glance, a cruise can be a great value (or even a lousy value, depending on the individual).

 

I hope you enjoy your cruise (even if it's not your first choice;))!

 

 

 

I've never seen an escape room on a cruise:confused:. That seems like a fun idea and a good possible use of non-revenue generating space (not sure how much space they take), plus an indoor activity if weather is bad. I think we would sign up for one on a sea day if it was a reasonable price.

 

 

We're on the NCL Getaway, it has an escape room. For 4,200 people, though, I think it should have more than one. I plan to book immediately.

 

Escape rooms take hardly any space at all. The ones I have been to are usually 2-4 connecting rooms (you have to break out of one room to move to the next), but the rooms themselves are small, no larger than a bedroom and sometimes it is just a small hallway or compartment (claustrophobia being a common feature of the game). Actually, a cruise-themed escape room would be funny. You start with an inside cabin and each time you break out, it's into a cabin in a higher category.

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We're on the NCL Getaway, it has an escape room. For 4,200 people, though, I think it should have more than one. I plan to book immediately.

 

Escape rooms take hardly any space at all. The ones I have been to are usually 2-4 connecting rooms (you have to break out of one room to move to the next), but the rooms themselves are small, no larger than a bedroom and sometimes it is just a small hallway or compartment (claustrophobia being a common feature of the game). Actually, a cruise-themed escape room would be funny. You start with an inside cabin and each time you break out, it's into a cabin in a higher category.

 

Do you know how much it costs? I haven't done one yet, but I think I saw some near me charging around $25 pp (USD).

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Do you know how much it costs? I haven't done one yet, but I think I saw some near me charging around $25 pp (USD).

 

That seems standard. In my area, the standard rate is C$25 per person for a 45-minute room and C$30 for a 1-hour room, but of course the C$ is only about 75% of a US$. We do them with our kids (currently 12&14), they are lots of fun. More interactive than movie night. We are not very good at them, but we usually manage to break out or get really close in a room rated moderate difficulty.

 

The escape room is included on the NCL Getaway, I read that it's hard and they allow groups up to 10 people. I've never done an escape room with strangers but I think it would be fun.

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The Escape room on the Getaway was free last December. It was in a largish room with different stations/puzzles to solve.

 

You are put in groups to figure out the clues to unlock--there were probably 8 or so groups of 6-8 people each, all at one time. It was circus or carnival themed.

 

Our group did not do very well! I had not done an escape room before, so I have no idea how this normally works. I might have liked it better if you could do a room just with your own group. It was tough!

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That seems standard. In my area, the standard rate is C$25 per person for a 45-minute room and C$30 for a 1-hour room, but of course the C$ is only about 75% of a US$. We do them with our kids (currently 12&14), they are lots of fun. More interactive than movie night. We are not very good at them, but we usually manage to break out or get really close in a room rated moderate difficulty.

 

The escape room is included on the NCL Getaway, I read that it's hard and they allow groups up to 10 people. I've never done an escape room with strangers but I think it would be fun.

 

The Escape room on the Getaway was free last December. It was in a largish room with different stations/puzzles to solve.

 

You are put in groups to figure out the clues to unlock--there were probably 8 or so groups of 6-8 people each, all at one time. It was circus or carnival themed.

 

Our group did not do very well! I had not done an escape room before, so I have no idea how this normally works. I might have liked it better if you could do a room just with your own group. It was tough!

 

It's nice that the activity is included:) Sorry for the thread-jack OP

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Impossible to answer this since everyone has a different perception of value.

 

We think that the value of cruising has diminished over the past five years. We are doing far less cruising and far more independent land travel. We find that cruise prices are up and the cruise lines have reduced the quality of the product.

 

We also find that cruise lines do not often taken us where we want to go. When they do, there is not enough time at the port.

 

Cruise lines have a goal. It is to have you spend as much time as possible on the ship so that you will spend as much as possible on the ship vs. in port.

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This is such an interesting question! I have pondered this myself because my family will be going on a Baltics cruise next year that will eat up 9 days of the 3 weeks we planned to spend in Europe. A cruise was probably not my first choice, but it was the compromise I reached with my extended family because we had all agreed to meet up in Europe for a week or so and a cruise was the consensus choice as being the most accommodating of everybody's different travel styles.

 

I answer the question in two ways:

 

1) Subjective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would otherwise spend in the same amount of time in Europe? What was my opportunity cost?

 

2) Objective value. How does the cost of cruising compare to how much I would have had to pay to get a similar vacation on land rather than a ship?

 

First, the cost of the cruise. We got a family balcony, the cheapest cabin I thought my family (2 adults + 2 young teens) could be comfortable in without feeling deprived, and I expect to buy 1 excursion to St. Petersburg but DIY it everywhere else with public transport. Our onboard extras will be moderate as we have fairly simple tastes. However, I will buy things I think my family will use and enjoy and also give the kids some spending money and of course you have to factor in gratuities. My all-in estimated cost is $12,000 for 9 days, which works out to estimated average daily cost of $1,333 per day.

 

For subjective value, I asked myself what I would be doing with the 9 days if not cruising. The answer is easy. At present we will spend slightly less than 2 weeks in Reykjavik, Paris and Copenhagen. If I had 9 more days I would probably skip Copenhagen and split the time between any 2 of London, Berlin or Amsterdam. However, when we do city travel, we travel fairly cheaply: airbnb in the centre of town, 2/3 meals cooked or eaten at home, walk or public transport, DIY sightsee rather than tours and spend our entertainment dollars on a judicious mix of expensive and free activities. Our main goal, other than some of the must-sees (e.g., Louvre, Eiffel Tower) is for the family to get comfortable in a new city and try to get into the rhythm of living there. So the cost of such a fairly simple vacation would be much less. My estimated average daily cost in any of London, Berlin or Stockholm, with airfare or train fare for 1 additional destination is $700 a day.

 

Nevertheless, this is not an apples to apples comparison as the inputs vary greatly. On a cruise, I get way more service, way more entertainment, way more restaurant food and way more countries and stops in. An objective comparison would take all of that into account.

 

So in assessing objective value, I compare the cruise cost to the cost of a land-based vacation with a similar level of service, entertainment, restaurant dining, unlimited booze, etc. And here is my calculation:

 

1. Summer rates for a standard room in a low-end 5-star hotel in central Berlin/London or Stockholm, i.e., 24-hour service, onsite spa/fitness/pool, dining and other options onsite, housekeeping, turndown service. $700 a night.

 

2. Restaurant dining for 4 people on the low to medium end, 3 meals a day and snacks, plus alcohol for 2 adults based on average drinker. $400 a day.

 

3. Combination of one-way ferry / airfare / train / transfers to each of the ports of call (Warnemunde, Stockholm, Talinn, St. Petersburg) in the same timeframe. About $500 per destination or total $2000. Average daily cost for 9 days: $225 a day.

 

4. Entertainment (shows, escape room, ropes course, museums we would have visited from the cruise etc.) and 1 tour in St. Petersburg for 4 people based on 1-2 paid activities per day (we like to take it easy). $250 a day.

 

Total estimated average daily cost for similar land-based vacation: $1,575 a day.

 

Subjectively, I would say cruising is bad value compared to what I would have chosen simply because I would make much cheaper choices left to my own devices, but objectively it is pretty good value compared to what it would have cost me to get the same approximate level of vacation on land.

 

Obviously, each type of vacation has intangibles that are not valued. E.g., what price do you put on the pleaure of seeing the ocean everywhere you turn? Or getting to know people from all over the world? Or letting your kids roam free knowing they are relatively safe onboard the ship? How do you value the enjoyment of buying your food fresh in the open market and chatting up locals? How does an ocean sunset compare to the Eiffel Tower lit at night?

 

Like everyone else said, there are costs and benefits, and it's both good and bad value, depending on what you're looking for.

 

Perhaps after I've cruised for the first time, I will fall in love with the cruise life and decide that I DO enjoy that kind of service-intensive vacation and decide that it's GREAT value. :)

Excellent reply! :)

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This will vary dramatically. For my family, yes, cruising is a great value! We live within driving distance of most southern US ports (FL, AL, NOLA). I have 3 kids, so airfare gets expensive.

 

I usually look for deals where either kids sail free or at a discount, or second/third passengers are at a discount. And because we usually end up with an empty space that’s free/discounted, I bring a “mommy helper” to make things more enjoyable for my husband and I (I’m not necessarily “on a budget” just value-minded).

 

Considering meals are included and I have a lot of little snackers, the all inclusive food really factors into the value. So does all the built in kid friendly entertainment on the ship (ie no having to pay for entertainment ALL day).

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We have recently retired and are fortunate enough to be able to take several holidays each year. All are different. Good value to us after years of working very long hours.

 

This year we did a balcony cabin South American cruise in January. Expensive when you factor in flights...but so interesting to see glaciers, Cape Horn etc. April was 4* all inclusive to Spain, May Half board 4* Tenerife and next one four weeks fly drive California/ Arizona..

 

Each holiday is very different from the others...but the value is what you make it and what you want from it. Check more carefully what is included and extras you might end up paying.

 

In Tenerife earlier this month add ons might have included 15 euros a day for two sunbeds on beach with umbrella daily, morning coffee 5 euros for two, lunch with soft drink, 15 euros for two, mini golf on promenade was 4 euros each, ice cream 3 euros each. Soon mounts up to about 50 euros daily, for things included on a cruise..before you think of evening entertainment or drinks ( you'd pay for those wherever)

 

You can make a cruise more expensive by adding a drinks package, buying the many photographs offered, taking ship's excursions, eating at extra cost restaurants, casino, buying art from the auctions, etc etc...it is all about what is important to you. To be able to do all the holidays we do, we don't tend to do these things!

 

One big problem for us is...cruising is addictive. Once you've been, you'll be forever looking for the next!

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We have recently retired and are fortunate enough to be able to take several holidays each year. All are different. Good value to us after years of working very long hours.

 

This year we did a balcony cabin South American cruise in January. Expensive when you factor in flights...but so interesting to see glaciers, Cape Horn etc. April was 4* all inclusive to Spain, May Half board 4* Tenerife and next one four weeks fly drive California/ Arizona..

 

Each holiday is very different from the others...but the value is what you make it and what you want from it. Check more carefully what is included and extras you might end up paying.

 

In Tenerife earlier this month add ons might have included 15 euros a day for two sunbeds on beach with umbrella daily, morning coffee 5 euros for two, lunch with soft drink, 15 euros for two, mini golf on promenade was 4 euros each, ice cream 3 euros each. Soon mounts up to about 50 euros daily, for things included on a cruise..before you think of evening entertainment or drinks ( you'd pay for those wherever)

 

You can make a cruise more expensive by adding a drinks package, buying the many photographs offered, taking ship's excursions, eating at extra cost restaurants, casino, buying art from the auctions, etc etc...it is all about what is important to you. To be able to do all the holidays we do, we don't tend to do these things!

 

One big problem for us is...cruising is addictive. Once you've been, you'll be forever looking for the next!

 

Just received credit card bill for Tenerife...extra charges I had forgotten about...Fridge in room 10 euros, safe in room 3 euros daily and water in dining room at dinner 2.50 euros a day. Just some of the things included on a cruise

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Just received credit card bill for Tenerife...extra charges I had forgotten about...Fridge in room 10 euros, safe in room 3 euros daily and water in dining room at dinner 2.50 euros a day. Just some of the things included on a cruise
I never use the safe in the room, cos they have a master unlocking code (if you forget your code) or a master key to open it.

In MSC and Costa, water in the dining room is charged.

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Of course, i didnt think as it was just a general question about cruising as my wife adn I are starting to question its value. Its Celebrity Silhouette, 13 nights, consiege class. As I say, it was more a general question about value with cruising

 

You could save a lot of money buy going to for a less expensive room instead.

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Values fluctuate between individuals but I certainly think the cruises we book are.:D

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If the question is about cruising in general...... a repositioning cruise can be as cheap as $ 800 for 13-15 days.

My husband and I just booked a world cruise for 2020.112 nights for about $17,000 each. That includes 15 excursions and beer and wine at lunch and dinner.

We'll get to many ports that we would not go to otherwise; Tahiti, South America, japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Oman, Petra, etc.

Yes, I realize we'll see very little of these ports, but we probably would never go to otherwise.(Easter Island, a stop at Pitcairn Island).

 

We never go deluxe class on any vacation so it's hard for me to compare. "Concierge" service to me is when my husband gets me my second cup of coffee in the morning

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If the question is about cruising in general...... a repositioning cruise can be as cheap as $ 800 for 13-15 days.

My husband and I just booked a world cruise for 2020.112 nights for about $17,000 each. That includes 15 excursions and beer and wine at lunch and dinner.

We'll get to many ports that we would not go to otherwise; Tahiti, South America, japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Oman, Petra, etc.

Yes, I realize we'll see very little of these ports, but we probably would never go to otherwise.(Easter Island, a stop at Pitcairn Island).

 

We never go deluxe class on any vacation so it's hard for me to compare. "Concierge" service to me is when my husband gets me my second cup of coffee in the morning

Wow, 112 nights! That's amazing!!

 

1) How will they manage 112 different shows? Is there a show every night?

 

2) What about the other gameshows and entertainment for 112 days? Will it be different every evening?

 

3) How many countries? How many visas? Which countries need advance visas? How many blank pages are required in your passport for visas?

 

I have great difficulty convincing my wife to come for even a 29 night cruise I booked at an incredible price. She says a 7-10 night cruise is ideal. She even found a 14 night cruise to be too long and tiresome. Even boring. I really envy you!

 

Pardon me for all the questions and thanks again for for the information!

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Wow, 112 nights! That's amazing!!

 

1) How will they manage 112 different shows? Is there a show every night?

 

2) What about the other gameshows and entertainment for 112 days? Will it be different every evening?

 

3) How many countries? How many visas? Which countries need advance visas? How many blank pages are required in your passport for visas?

 

I have great difficulty convincing my wife to come for even a 29 night cruise I booked at an incredible price. She says a 7-10 night cruise is ideal. She even found a 14 night cruise to be too long and tiresome. Even boring. I really envy you!

 

Pardon me for all the questions and thanks again for for the information!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

There will not be totally different shows every night and many will be the same singers doing a different routine. I expect entertainers will come on board and leave at different ports. There will be something every night though.

I think we'll need several visas. The ship will take care of some on board, but we may need to purchase some ahead of time. The company has already warned us about that and we'll work on it closer the the sail date.

 

I do expect we'll find some of it boring. But I get bored at home sometimes too. And even though we live in an "over 55" community near the beach with lots to do, I think I'll be very happy being bored in the South Pacific heading for Tahiti after leaving four days in Australia!

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Posted (edited)

If I am paying for so many nights, I would definitely like to see a show every night, cos I paid for it. (Just like we expect gourmet food every day)

Long cruises are not discounted, in fact they are disproportionately more expensive.

If an inside cabin in a 7 night cruise is $500, an inside cabin in a 112 night cruise is MUCH MORE than $8000 (16 times). Do the math.

Pardon me, but I think that a world cruise is certainly NOT value for money.

They are ridiculously overpriced, cos the cruise lines know that only rich retirees can afford so much time and money.

You will get fed up with the same food and daily activities for 112 days.

Also the numerous visas required are a nuisance. (Please don't take it personally, it's just my opinion!)

Edited by drsel

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If I am paying for so many nights, I would definitely like to see a show every night, cos I paid for it. (Just like we expect gourmet food every day)

Long cruises are not discounted, in fact they are disproportionately more expensive.

If an inside cabin in a 7 night cruise is $500, an inside cabin in a 112 night cruise is MUCH MORE than $8000 (16 times). Do the math.

Pardon me, but I think that a world cruise is certainly NOT value for money.

They are ridiculously overpriced, cos the cruise lines know that only rich retirees can afford so much time and money.

You will get fed up with the same food and daily activities for 112 days.

Also the numerous visas required are a nuisance. (Please don't take it personally, it's just my opinion!)

 

I don't know if we will every do a world cruise, but I would expect it to be very different than a 7 night cruise. I can't imagine wanting to go to shows every night (or the logistics of different sets). I would think I would relish a few days to just decompress after intensive ports. I expect good banquet level food, but certainly not gourmet food included in the cost of a mainstream line. I think that lines doing world cruises would likely have better food, but would not look for "gourmet" each day (nor would my stomach likely handle it). Menu items repeat on 7 days, and those that don't pax often complain that they can only get it one night. I suspect there would be plenty of variety to not be fed up with the food. Knowing that the menu repeats probably leads to less waste from people ordering multiple dishes since they know they can try the item later.

 

I suspect some of the added cost of longer cruise is the lack of pax turnover, which likely leads to less on-board revenue. It makes sense that gambling, alcohol sales, and gift shop purchases would be down.

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As the title asks, are we getting value?

 

 

 

My wife and I have booked our first cruise which is going to cost us 5200 pounds. It is also slightly out of season so we could face the potential of only seeing the maximum of 5-7 days of sun of the two weeks. While my wife hates flying it is not out of the question for us to do a short haul flight but it would be literally impossible for us to see as many countries as we could cruising. With the extras that we need to pay out for the cruise as well we are looking at least 6500 pounds for the holiday, at conservative estimates.

 

 

 

In comparison I am a big Disney World fan and have priced up a holiday for 2 weeks on International Drive for only 3500 flying premium economy including theme park tickets, meaning even if we spent 2500 pounds on extras it would cost the same. Also in comparison we could go to Italy for 2 weeks in a 5 star hotel to Lake Garda with premium flights in September for 2500 pounds.

 

 

 

Of course with this cruise the 1300 pound 'extras' has to pay for parking at Southampton, hotel stay overnight, exursions, more expensive drinks, tips, gifts, any meals off ship at port and any non main dining options on ship. So really we could be looking at least 6500 for this holiday all in.

 

 

 

So back to the original question, are we getting value for money when compared to other holidays?

 

 

 

If you are a grasping, penny-pinching Scrooge, a cruise is not for you because you pay all the facilities whether or not you use them. Swimming in the wave-pool at 3.00am because you paid for it is no fun and may spoil your holiday.

 

I recommend a holiday to Cambodia or North Korea where foreign currency is highly prized. You can haggle for cheap taxis and sleep in very humble accommodation for just $2 per night.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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One thing that is perhaps being undervalued about being on a cruise is the convenience and security of it. A cruise is a prepackaged vacation that comes with the guarantee of quality offered by the giant cruise company. You get a nice selection of dining, entertainment and accommodations without having to research it yourself. In general, cruise ships seem to be able to deliver on expectations or people would not return.

 

A cruise also offers you safe access to exotic ports that many people might not feel comfortable travelling on their own as they feel they lack the knowledge and experience.

 

So I think the value of a cruise goes beyond its constituent parts and "how much would this cost if I had to buy it on land?" It encompasses the feeling of being well taken care of.

 

After all, not everybody is looking for danger, adventure and challenge in their travels, and not everybody enjoys spending days and days researching to stitch together the 101 elements that go into creating the perfect vacation. Some people just want mindless relaxation and ease. Nothing wrong with that on a vacation, is there? :)

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Have you seen reduction in cruise fares in any cruise line?

 

Are there any budget cruises or cruise lines? Bahamas Paradise? Any other?

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Have you seen reduction in cruise fares in any cruise line?

 

Are there any budget cruises or cruise lines? Bahamas Paradise? Any other?

 

I've seen prices go down on a number of occasions. That's why we keep a constant eye on scheduled cruises right up to the final payment date. Recently was able to make a change on a cruise we were scheduled to take that netted us $1000 of OBC.

 

Tom

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I've seen prices go down on a number of occasions. That's why we keep a constant eye on scheduled cruises right up to the final payment date. Recently was able to make a change on a cruise we were scheduled to take that netted us $1000 of OBC.

 

Tom

Wow, which cruise had a price crashes of $1000?

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Sure, many cruises go down in price, sometimes a lot. We saved $500 each on a South America cruise last year--went from $1799 to $1299 on a balcony cabin, 14 day cruise. We didn't lose any OBC or perks either. You just have to monitor the prices; this reduction was actually mentioned on our roll call and lasted only one day. Quite a few people took advantage of this. We just contacted our TA and he got the reduction. We thought the original price was a decent deal for an Around the Horn cruise, so this was a big bonus.

 

Prices also go up; we find a price we are ok with and then watch to see what happens. We don't book planning on prices going down. Getting a great price sometimes means being quite flexible.

 

There are a few 'bargain' cruise lines that mostly do very short trips to places like the Bahamas, but most of the major cruise lines still can have decent to great prices at times.

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I've seen prices go down on a number of occasions. That's why we keep a constant eye on scheduled cruises right up to the final payment date.

Tom

Same here

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Demand drives the pricing for all cruises and if there is a high demand will drive prices up, if a lack of demand, prices will drop,. This is most likely to happen on cruises that are one way or on cruises that have the same itineraries over and over again, or cruises that are scheduled when the weather is likely to be worse (off peak or shoulder seasons).

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My basic thing is, if I want to do it, and enjoy it, and can afford it, FINE.

 

If I don't want to do it, I don't. If I don't enjoy it, I don't do it. And if I can't afford it, I don't do it.

 

I do not worry about "value." As if I want, enjoy, and can afford it, it is valuable to ME.

 

We did two weeks in Orlando over Xmas/New Years. It was expensive. But we enjoyed it. We just did a week driving around Sicily, great fun, cheaper than Orlando, but we still value the experience.

Christmas and New Years are among the most expensive times to cruise. In general, criusing is a great value over a one vacation. To compare, determine what you would spend on a land vacation - cost of a moderate hotel including taxes, fees, and parking as applicable; cost of meals (don't forget to add cost of tips, which is generally far more than the ship's autotips), transportation costs to the various restaurants, attractions, etc.; admission to daily entertainment (movie tickets, etc). I guarantee this costs are considerably more than the same number of days on a cruise most times of the year. (To be fair, be sure to the taxes and fees , not just the base fare and autotips, and parking as applicable). Cruise at an off-peak time and you will save considerably more compared to most land vacations in the off season.

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Christmas and New Years are among the most expensive times to cruise. In general, criusing is a great value over a one vacation. To compare, determine what you would spend on a land vacation - cost of a moderate hotel including taxes, fees, and parking as applicable; cost of meals (don't forget to add cost of tips, which is generally far more than the ship's autotips), transportation costs to the various restaurants, attractions, etc.; admission to daily entertainment (movie tickets, etc). I guarantee this costs are considerably more than the same number of days on a cruise most times of the year. (To be fair, be sure to the taxes and fees , not just the base fare and autotips, and parking as applicable). Cruise at an off-peak time and you will save considerably more compared to most land vacations in the off season.
Land vacations in Thailand and India are the best value

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If I am paying for so many nights, I would definitely like to see a show every night, cos I paid for it. (Just like we expect gourmet food every day)

Long cruises are not discounted, in fact they are disproportionately more expensive.

If an inside cabin in a 7 night cruise is $500, an inside cabin in a 112 night cruise is MUCH MORE than $8000 (16 times). Do the math.

Pardon me, but I think that a world cruise is certainly NOT value for money.

They are ridiculously overpriced, cos the cruise lines know that only rich retirees can afford so much time and money.

You will get fed up with the same food and daily activities for 112 days.

Also the numerous visas required are a nuisance. (Please don't take it personally, it's just my opinion!)

 

 

 

Can say that we did a half world cruise - Southampton to Sydney - 47 nights - and certainly did not get bored. Varied acts came and went and we had some amazing ports of call. Would certainly do it again, or even a world cruise if we could afford it, and we only needed Estas and Etas. A world cruise is certainly worth doing and not just by rich retirees - everyone spends their money how they see fit and 'value for money' is very subjective.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Can say that we did a half world cruise - Southampton to Sydney - 47 nights - and certainly did not get bored. Varied acts came and went and we had some amazing ports of call. Would certainly do it again, or even a world cruise if we could afford it, and we only needed Estas and Etas. A world cruise is certainly worth doing and not just by rich retirees - everyone spends their money how they see fit and 'value for money' is very subjective.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Yes, a world cruise is wonderful, but very rarely (if at all ) available at under $70 per person per day (for the most economical cabin).

While there are quite a few 7-15 day cruises available for under $70 per person per day. These are really value for money, the focal point of this thread "Is cruising value for money"

How much did each of you pay for your 47 night cruise?

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Back to the OP, I just don't think they are comparable. Different experience on each. Even an all-inclusive resort vs. cruising is different. I've done them all and each has it's rewards and flaws.

 

I absolutely love sea air. So that is a huge benefit for a cruise. My wife and I have a basic balcony booked for this January on Celebrity and I can't wait. Disney = $$$. And if you want to penny pinch, you will really limit your fun.

 

*sidebar* We were at a bar at Universal and a guy walked in and asked for a glass of water. He then went to pull out his wallet and the bartender looked at him, laughed and yelled: "Hey, this isn't Disney, we don't F^&*% charge for water here."

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