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Schengen Area - ETIAS and Visas

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As the 2020 European schedule is shortly to be released, I thought it was worthwhile offering an update on the changes to arrangements for tourists visiting from the US which are expected to be introduced in 2020.

 

I offer this in good faith, and simply ask that you do not ‘shoot the messenger.

 

There are two aspects to the potential changes.

 

The first is something referred to as ETIAS which is the European equivalent of the US ESTA scheme. As with the ESTA, it is linked to the visa waiver scheme as it is proposed to introduce this in 2020. It is a pre-approval to use the visa waiver arrangements related to heightened security requirements. Like the ESTA application, approval and payment will all be done on line. However, whereas an ESTA approval last for two years, it is proposed that the ETIAS will be valid for three years and cost one third of the price of an ESTA. So, whilst it is a increased burden on ALL visitors to the EU, in the case of US citizens it still remains a better deal than the US offer to EU citizens.

This link provides more information:

https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/etias/

 

The second is the whole issue of whether or not the visa waiver scheme for US citizens visiting the EU (and in all probability, as a consequence for EU citizens visiting the USA) will be withdrawn.

 

To be honest, I am not sure where we are on this matter, but the problem arises because the EU requires that there is no discrimination between the citizens of the 26 Schengen countries. The reason that this is a problem is that the US only allows 20 if the 26 Schengen countries to participate in the visa waiver scheme and in March 2017 the European Parliament instructed the EU commission to introduce a visa requirement for US citizens unless the US visa waiver scheme was expanded to include all Schengen countries.

 

https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/european-parliament-votes-end-visa-free-travel-americans/

 

To be fair, I drafted this note to cover the ETIAS scheme and only included this for completeness. I must stress that I have not been able to find out what the current situation is, though suffice to say that the EU Commission don’t appear to have done anything to change the current arrangements.

 

Perhaps someone had more recent information which that are able to offer, on the visa issue, but the bottom line is that folks booking European cruises for 2020 will probably need to make an on line application in order to qualify for participation in the visa waiver scheme

 

 

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Interesting! Do you know when they're expected to make a final decision? While it'd be a bummer to have to do a similar ESTA for US citizens going to the EU, it only seems fair since we expect that of UK citizens (& others).

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As the 2020 European schedule is shortly to be released, I thought it was worthwhile offering an update on the changes to arrangements for tourists visiting from the US which are expected to be introduced in 2020.

 

I offer this in good faith, and simply ask that you do not ‘shoot the messenger.

 

There are two aspects to the potential changes.

 

The first is something referred to as ETIAS which is the European equivalent of the US ESTA scheme. As with the ESTA, it is linked to the visa waiver scheme as it is proposed to introduce this in 2020. It is a pre-approval to use the visa waiver arrangements related to heightened security requirements. Like the ESTA application, approval and payment will all be done on line. However, whereas an ESTA approval last for two years, it is proposed that the ETIAS will be valid for three years and cost one third of the price of an ESTA. So, whilst it is a increased burden on ALL visitors to the EU, in the case of US citizens it still remains a better deal than the US offer to EU citizens.

This link provides more information:

https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/etias/

 

The second is the whole issue of whether or not the visa waiver scheme for US citizens visiting the EU (and in all probability, as a consequence for EU citizens visiting the USA) will be withdrawn.

 

To be honest, I am not sure where we are on this matter, but the problem arises because the EU requires that there is no discrimination between the citizens of the 26 Schengen countries. The reason that this is a problem is that the US only allows 20 if the 26 Schengen countries to participate in the visa waiver scheme and in March 2017 the European Parliament instructed the EU commission to introduce a visa requirement for US citizens unless the US visa waiver scheme was expanded to include all Schengen countries.

 

https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/european-parliament-votes-end-visa-free-travel-americans/

 

To be fair, I drafted this note to cover the ETIAS scheme and only included this for completeness. I must stress that I have not been able to find out what the current situation is, though suffice to say that the EU Commission don’t appear to have done anything to change the current arrangements.

 

Perhaps someone had more recent information which that are able to offer, on the visa issue, but the bottom line is that folks booking European cruises for 2020 will probably need to make an on line application in order to qualify for participation in the visa waiver scheme

 

 

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Why is it being called a scheme?

 

verb

verb: scheme; 3rd person present: schemes; past tense: schemed; past participle: schemed; gerund or present participle: scheming

1.

make plans, especially in a devious way or with intent to do something illegal or wrong.

 

 

 

 

We had to pay an ETA to go to Australia, I didn't find it to be a scheme, but just a tax to US citizens to visit their country. There's nothing devious, illegal or wrong about it. JMHO

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Why is it being called a scheme?

 

verb

verb: scheme; 3rd person present: schemes; past tense: schemed; past participle: schemed; gerund or present participle: scheming

1.

make plans, especially in a devious way or with intent to do something illegal or wrong.

 

 

 

 

We had to pay an ETA to go to Australia, I didn't find it to be a scheme, but just a tax to US citizens to visit their country. There's nothing devious, illegal or wrong about it. JMHO

noun

 

1.

 

a large-scale systematic plan or arrangement for attaining some particular object or putting a particular idea into effect.

 

"the occupational sick pay scheme"

 

synonyms:plan,*project,*plan of action,*programme,*strategy,*stratagem,*game plan;*More

 

 

Anyway, disregarding all above definitions, it's actually officially known as the 'Visa Waiver Program'.

 

https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta/

 

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Why is it being called a scheme?

 

verb

verb: scheme; 3rd person present: schemes; past tense: schemed; past participle: schemed; gerund or present participle: scheming

1.

make plans, especially in a devious way or with intent to do something illegal or wrong.

 

 

 

 

We had to pay an ETA to go to Australia, I didn't find it to be a scheme, but just a tax to US citizens to visit their country. There's nothing devious, illegal or wrong about it. JMHO

 

 

 

Oops, I guess we have found yet another area where US English varies from Commonwealth English.

 

For us ‘scheme’ can be both a verb, when there is an implication of deviousness, and a noun, where it means a formal arrangement for implementing a policy decision with no implication of deviousness.

 

 

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Found this update on the visa exemption status.

 

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-17-5314_en.htm

 

Apparently, as of December, the issue of full reciprocity has been resolved with every country except the USA.

 

In the case of the US, discussions involving the US, the EU Commission and the five Schengen countries which do not have visa free access to the US is ongoing and the key paragraph is as follows:

 

“Next Steps

The Commission remains committed to working closely with the European Parliament and the Council on the way forward. The Commission will continue to engage with the U.S. and the Member States concerned to achieve full visa waiver reciprocity. The Justice and Home Affairs Senior Officials' Meeting on 27-28 February 2018 and the EU-U.S. Justice and Home Affairs Ministerial Meeting in May 2018 will provide occasions to further accelerate progress. The Commission will report to the European Parliament and the Council on further developments at the latest by autumn 2018”

 

To put that quote into context, it important to remember that the EU Commission is fully answerable and subordinate to the EU Parliament who gave them a very clear instruction in March 2017.

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Corfe Mixture

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Found this update on the visa exemption status.

 

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-17-5314_en.htm

 

Apparently, as of December, the issue of full reciprocity has been resolved with every country except the USA.

 

In the case of the US, discussions involving the US, the EU Commission and the five Schengen countries which do not have visa free access to the US is ongoing and the key paragraph is as follows:

 

“Next Steps

The Commission remains committed to working closely with the European Parliament and the Council on the way forward. The Commission will continue to engage with the U.S. and the Member States concerned to achieve full visa waiver reciprocity. The Justice and Home Affairs Senior Officials' Meeting on 27-28 February 2018 and the EU-U.S. Justice and Home Affairs Ministerial Meeting in May 2018 will provide occasions to further accelerate progress. The Commission will report to the European Parliament and the Council on further developments at the latest by autumn 2018”

 

To put that quote into context, it important to remember that the EU Commission is fully answerable and subordinate to the EU Parliament who gave them a very clear instruction in March 2017.

 

 

 

 

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Will be interesting to see what happens.

 

Would not be surprised if travel gets more restrictive. The EU wants the same access for all 26. My understanding is that the US has stricter requirements for the 5 because the US Department of State feels that they have insufficient controls in place for their passport issuance process.

 

As such its comes down to will all 5 tighten up their passport control processes or will the US relent on its view.

 

Most likely neither and travel will get more cumbersome.

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"Scheme" is used by the Brits in a context we are not used to here in the US (unless you watch lots of Brit TV like I do!). It doesn't mean anything sinister, but a "plan" or arrangement.

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Oops, I guess we have found yet another area where US English varies from Commonwealth English.

 

For us ‘scheme’ can be both a verb, when there is an implication of deviousness, and a noun, where it means a formal arrangement for implementing a policy decision with no implication of deviousness.

 

 

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Often times when I hear the word scheme, it makes me think of someone trying to rip off someone else. I can see where the English language can have barriers. I'm learning a lot of the differences in what Australians say and what we say here in the US. Brekkie is breakfast, but I guess when we arrive in Australia, it will be brekkie

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Will be interesting to see what happens.

 

Would not be surprised if travel gets more restrictive. The EU wants the same access for all 26. My understanding is that the US has stricter requirements for the 5 because the US Department of State feels that they have insufficient controls in place for their passport issuance process.

 

As such its comes down to will all 5 tighten up their passport control processes or will the US relent on its view.

Most likely neither and travel will get more cumbersome.

 

Definitely more cumbersome. I'm hearing that some airports when going through TSA, that you must take your snacks out of your carry on and place them in a separate bin. People are complaining about their terrorist Cheetos being inspected. Travelers get their terrorist snacks back once through TSA.

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Definitely more cumbersome. I'm hearing that some airports when going through TSA, that you must take your snacks out of your carry on and place them in a separate bin. People are complaining about their terrorist Cheetos being inspected. Travelers get their terrorist snacks back once through TSA.

LOL :D Thanks for the laugh. Needed that today! :D

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Often times when I hear the word scheme, it makes me think of someone trying to rip off someone else. I can see where the English language can have barriers. I'm learning a lot of the differences in what Australians say and what we say here in the US. Brekkie is breakfast, but I guess when we arrive in Australia, it will be brekkie

 

 

 

one of the more interesting differences is that we walk on the ‘pavement’ because we want to be safe. US citizens walking on the ‘pavement’ do so because they have a death wish

🤨

 

 

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Why is it being called a scheme?

 

verb

verb: scheme; 3rd person present: schemes; past tense: schemed; past participle: schemed; gerund or present participle: scheming

1.

make plans, especially in a devious way or with intent to do something illegal or wrong.

 

 

 

We had to pay an ETA to go to Australia, I didn't find it to be a scheme, but just a tax to US citizens to visit their country. There's nothing devious, illegal or wrong about it. JMHO

 

The word "scheme" in the UK and no doubt elsewhere (other than the USA) simply means something like a "program". Nothing untoward is even remotely suggested.

 

Yes, in the USA, a "scheme" can be something nefarious, but it needn't be so.

 

GC

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Often times when I hear the word scheme, it makes me think of someone trying to rip off someone else. I can see where the English language can have barriers. I'm learning a lot of the differences in what Australians say and what we say here in the US. Brekkie is breakfast, but I guess when we arrive in Australia, it will be brekkie

 

People who see conspiracies everywhere and half empty glasses instead of half full ones and who have nothing better to do with their short time on this earth than pick over others posts in nitpicking detail as to exact word use must live in a sad world.

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As the 2020 European schedule is shortly to be released, I thought it was worthwhile offering an update on the changes to arrangements for tourists visiting from the US which are expected to be introduced in 2020.

 

I offer this in good faith, and simply ask that you do not ‘shoot the messenger.

 

 

This is Cruise Critic.... Do you require a blind fold and would you like a last cigarette?|

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As the 2020 European schedule is shortly to be released, I thought it was worthwhile offering an update on the changes to arrangements for tourists visiting from the US which are expected to be introduced in 2020.

 

 

 

I offer this in good faith, and simply ask that you do not ‘shoot the messenger.

 

 

 

 

 

This is Cruise Critic.... Do you require a blind fold and would you like a last cigarette?|

 

 

ROFL.

Too true but I thought it was important information relevant to US citizens which I actually came across whilst trying to work out the effect of Brexit on me over the fact that I regularly spend more than 90 days of our summer in France.

FWIW the probable answer, unless some comes up with an unlikely deal, is that I will not be able to use the ETIAS / Visa waiver arrangements and will need to apply for a Schengen visa issued by my first country of entry,which in my case is France.

 

What I didn’t expect was to get shot for using Commonwealth English instead US English.🤨

 

 

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ROFL.

Too true but I thought it was important information relevant to US citizens which I actually came across whilst trying to work out the effect of Brexit on me over the fact that I regularly spend more than 90 days of our summer in France.

FWIW the probable answer, unless some comes up with an unlikely deal, is that I will not be able to use the ETIAS / Visa waiver arrangements and will need to apply for a Schengen visa issued by my first country of entry,which in my case is France.

 

What I didn’t expect was to get shot for using Commonwealth English instead US English.🤨

 

 

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It's not our fault they don't understand the mother tongue...

 

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The British and the Americans, two people’s separated by a common language. ( as said by an Irishman) Brexit is going to add additional twists to the visa conundrum when it kicks in, Britain has never been part of the Schengen travel area but depending on the terms of its departure from the EU there could be an added layer of visa requirements for cruisers flying via Britain or including a British port on their itinerary

 

 

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The British and the Americans, two people’s separated by a common language. ( as said by an Irishman) Brexit is going to add additional twists to the visa conundrum when it kicks in, Britain has never been part of the Schengen travel area but depending on the terms of its departure from the EU there could be an added layer of visa requirements for cruisers flying via Britain or including a British port on their itinerary

 

 

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Did we need visas before the EU?

 

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Did we need visas before the EU?

 

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The Schengen Area and EU is Not the same. Some EU countries are Not part of Schengen Area while some Schengen Countries are Not part of EU.

 

The Schengen area was established in 1995 and covers 26 countries ("Schengen States"). These countries are: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, SeaTheW0rld said:

All I can say is good luck dictating policy to the USA, EU.

My native language is not English so I might have misunderstood you intentions - however US have been dictating policies on EU for many years.

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19 hours ago, hallasm said:

My native language is not English so I might have misunderstood you intentions - however US have been dictating policies on EU for many years.

 

There's a reason for that. We can. The EU needs the US more than the US needs the EU. 

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2 hours ago, SeaTheW0rld said:

 

There's a reason for that. We can. The EU needs the US more than the US needs the EU. 

.... please be serious. The European ETIAS scheme for exact the same reason as the US ESTA

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