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The Take-Out Master of the Nieuw Statendam

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Copper, are you joining us on her?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

No Ma'am, they like to "man" new ships with crew who have done it before. Nieuw S S/O also "took out" the K-dam

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I hope that "take-out Master" sounds better in Dutch than it does in English, or that is a poor translation, 'cause I too keep thinking of someone who creates gourmet meals from room service platters.

 

We call them "Plank Owners".

 

Without the fairly new connotation of delivered food, a "take-out master" sounds just fine to me when translated to Dutch. Someone who owns a "heavy thick board" according to Merriam-Webster, not so much.

 

Then again, you know I once asked Sinterklaas for a plank, in order to build a boat, so I like the English expression better. :D

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No Ma'am, they like to "man" new ships with crew who have done it before. Nieuw S S/O also "took out" the K-dam

 

 

 

"Man your ship and bring her to life" :)

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No, I've been a plank owner for 4 ships, one drillship, one cruise ship, and two tankers.

 

 

What is a plank owner? I dont remember ever hearing that phrase before. :)

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What is a plank owner? I dont remember ever hearing that phrase before. :)

 

A plank owner is a crew member or officer who has taken a ship out of a shipyard at newbuild, the first officer or crew to hold that position on that new ship. It evokes the old practice of ship's officers buying into the cost of building a ship on which they would serve, essentially "buying some planks" to build the ship. Today, crew are given a memento of the occasion, like a plaque or similar.

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Without the fairly new connotation of delivered food, a "take-out master" sounds just fine to me when translated to Dutch. Someone who owns a "heavy thick board" according to Merriam-Webster, not so much.

 

Then again, you know I once asked Sinterklaas for a plank, in order to build a boat, so I like the English expression better. :D

 

"Naar buiten brengende meester" = take out master :cool:

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StickeyMouse,

I found this interview video with Captain De Boer. It is from several years ago.

After watching for a few minutes... definitely seems to show that he is very serious and introspective in nature/personality.

 

I am not thinking that he would be the Captain who would be found out and about onboard, friendly and gregarious with the passengers.

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A plank owner is a crew member or officer who has taken a ship out of a shipyard at newbuild, the first officer or crew to hold that position on that new ship. It evokes the old practice of ship's officers buying into the cost of building a ship on which they would serve, essentially "buying some planks" to build the ship. Today, crew are given a memento of the occasion, like a plaque or similar.

 

 

Thanks so much or the explanation. i enjoyed l learning about this tradition. :)

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StickeyMouse,

I found this interview video with Captain De Boer. It is from several years ago.

After watching for a few minutes... definitely seems to show that he is very serious and introspective in nature/personality.

 

I am not thinking that he would be the Captain who would be found out and about onboard, friendly and gregarious with the passengers.

 

 

 

If I never saw or spoke to the Captain during my cruise that would be fine with me. As long as he and his officers are doing their job, keeping me safe and on course, I don't need to meet him. It would have no effect on my enjoyment of the cruise.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

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I just watched the interview with Captain Sybe de Boer. (And, I thank the one who posted it!) I am looking forward to meeting him.

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Exactly. A logical word! "Plankbezitter". Wie verzint zoiets :)

 

Dat woord "plankbezitter" bestaat al weer een paar jaartjes maar wie het verzint heeft, dat weet ik echt niet ;)/ that word "plank owner" has been around for several years but who thought of it, I have no clue

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I would say that the Captain's professional philosophy and work ethic, more than his personality/vibe, with the crew, affect the performance of the crew more than his/her engagement with the passengers.

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I would say that the Captain's professional philosophy and work ethic, more than his personality/vibe, with the crew, affect the performance of the crew more than his/her engagement with the passengers.

 

Wise words, as usual

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I would say that the Captain's professional philosophy and work ethic, more than his personality/vibe, with the crew, affect the performance of the crew more than his/her engagement with the passengers.

 

I surely respect your opinion.

 

On one b2b cruise on the Noordam a few years ago, "something was amiss" that other 4-5 Star Mariners, not just me, sensed. The Captain's appearances at the Captain's Toast, Mariner Lunch, and my one contact with him in a hallway were "chilly" and not guest-friendly. The service experience from most of the crew in all Departments did not meet the then current slogan of "Signature of Excellence".

 

Maybe the Hotel Director was responsible for this? The only time I saw him was at the Captain's Toast.

 

It was a disappointing 21 day cruise due to my on-board experience.

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I surely respect your opinion.

 

On one b2b cruise on the Noordam a few years ago, "something was amiss" that other 4-5 Star Mariners, not just me, sensed. The Captain's appearances at the Captain's Toast, Mariner Lunch, and my one contact with him in a hallway were "chilly" and not guest-friendly. The service experience from most of the crew in all Departments did not meet the then current slogan of "Signature of Excellence".

 

Maybe the Hotel Director was responsible for this? The only time I saw him was at the Captain's Toast.

 

It was a disappointing 21 day cruise due to my on-board experience.

 

I can't say, because I don't know what that Captain's relationship with the crew was, perhaps "chilly" as well. It's my experience that crew respond far more to a friendly officer seen frequently in both guest and crew areas, who will stop and ask the crew how their day is going, maybe something personal if they know each other better, or how the officer can help the crew do their job better. And the time in guest areas is more effective if it is when the crew are doing their jobs around, not being seen shmoozing with the guests. That can show an example of the proper attitude towards guests, but a true, team friendly approach to crew from top to bottom will result in a much more upbeat crew, happier to do their job, and that will reflect on their attitude towards the guests.

 

I used to spend hours on turn around day, "circling" the passenger decks, particularly the cabin decks early in the day, and the crew knew that if they had any maintenance problems, I would be by within the hour, regardless of what deck or where, and they could tell me and I would mobilize engineering to fix the problem. I laugh at my wife these days with her fitbit recording her steps daily. I know I made 10-15 miles each turn around, and about half of that daily making the rounds.

 

Did I engage the guests? I never pushed myself on them, but was always friendly and available if they approached me. Did I go to and enjoy passenger "get togethers"? Nope, didn't feel it was part of my job, and time better spent with the crew.

 

JMHO.

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chengkp75,

 

Thanks for your response to my previous post. What you stated reinforces my experience in my cruising experience, my employment, and other situations. When Management is visible and "out and about", the employees/staff are more motivated and the client/customer/patient (in a health care setting) are better served.

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Hi Bob & Chief.

Just seen additional senior officers list for Nieuw Statendam.

Master - Capt. Sybe de Boer

Staff Capt. - Kevin Beirnaert

Chief Engineer - Eric van Loenen

Enviroment Off. - Dolf Kramer

Hotel Director - Don Habets.

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Hi Bob & Chief.

Just seen additional senior officers list for Nieuw Statendam.

Master - Capt. Sybe de Boer

Staff Capt. - Kevin Beirnaert

Chief Engineer - Eric van Loenen

Enviroment Off. - Dolf Kramer

Hotel Director - Don Habets.

 

Thank you Sea Dog-46!

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