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VistasBe

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Hello. We have just booked a cruise on SD2 for my DH birthday and after 20 plus years of cruising we are ready to try something new. We understand that SD is “Yachting Not Cruising” and that’s fine with us. This year we sailed on HALL MS Eurodam (Neptune Suite) which cost us as much as a deck 2 category on SD without being all inclusive 😟 and were very dissatisfied with the overall experience for the cost. We were happy to discover SD.

 

Where we need some guidance is how bad is bad when it comes to motion sickness on these yachts? Do they have stabalizers and if not what has been your experience regarding their ability to handle rough seas? We do take sea sickness meds as needed and wear wrist bands but we don’t want to be taking meds the whole week and not enjoying the complete experience. Some reviews have indicated issues with the ship rolling to the point that most guests were sick and ports were continually adjusted to minimize the weather issues. Port adjustments are not an issue for us we appreciate safety first. Any feedback or advice from the SD community would be appreciated. Thanks and happy yachting!

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I'll be honest. I love SeaDream, but I do get motion sickness when I cruise with them. It's happened on all three of my SD cruises. I don't think these ships have stabilizers, so when the water is rough, it can be tough going. I usually have pretty good luck with Bonine when motion sickness does strike. Also, I've heard there is a magic shot the ship's doctor can provide. I have not gotten the shot myself, but I have heard that it works very well.

 

The worst motion sickness I ever had was when we did a southern Caribbean trip. It wasn't as bad in Europe or up near Puerto Rico. Other people will surely add their experiences.

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In close to 20 sailings on SD, I have had only one experience of seasickness, and that was on our first sailing. Our first day and a half were at sea through storms out of San Juan. Everyone was sick and I swore this was the first and last small ship. Well, once I got better it was a whole new world. I always take a Bonine before the first sailaway, and then whenever the captain cautions about the motion of the ocean. My advice is take deck 2 midship. That means as close to the dining room as possible. It is more likely that you will experience rough sailing on the tender, which can get quite bouncy. And seasickness is not unique to tiny ships. I've had it on Azamara and SilverSea.

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You will love SeaDream after the “biggies” you have sailed. What have you booked? Time of year and region can tell you what is “normal “ and SD Captains are excellent at minimizing motion when possible. As a former Mariner and part time cruiser I have always thought the SD ships have a good motion. But if you are prone to motion discomfort it can be miserable. The “magic shot” works quickly and lasts the voyage. Pills need to be taken before you feel bad. Jack and ginger ale helps too.🥃😎

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Thanks everyone for your advice. Jim, we have booked SD2 out of SJ on the 02/22/20 sailing. Seems very far off but the itinerary worked for our birthday celebration. We are ok giving up the large window in place of portholes to minimize motion. We have booked stateroom 212 because it does not have the removable wall that allows for the Suite set up.

 

If anyone has sailed in February out of SJ a similar itinerary to ours how did you find the seas that time of year? Also, when the ship is anchored in port how did you find the motion? We will be packing our Bonine :D

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The company does a great job of avoiding ports where the seas are so high it would be dangerous to get on and off the tender. Many of the ports are protected from rough water, but not all. This is why you don't put out any money for tours, golf, etc. that you can't get back if the port is cancelled. It isn't very frequent, but there are far worse things. The captain's job is to keep you safe. The job of the rest of the crew is to keep you happy. That's the contract. While it seems the tender is bouncing up and down in some ports, we've never felt that on the boat itself. And they are very very careful getting people on and off the tender.

 

 

Good call on avoiding the rooms that can open up to Commodore Suites.

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Thanks everyone for your advice. Jim, we have booked SD2 out of SJ on the 02/22/20 sailing. Seems very far off but the itinerary worked for our birthday celebration. We are ok giving up the large window in place of portholes to minimize motion. We have booked stateroom 212 because it does not have the removable wall that allows for the Suite set up.

 

If anyone has sailed in February out of SJ a similar itinerary to ours how did you find the seas that time of year? Also, when the ship is anchored in port how did you find the motion? We will be packing our Bonine :D

We have sailed in 212 before and enjoyed a very quiet pleasant trip. Two deck let’s you enjoy the sound of the sea while providing the best motion possible on a ship. I echo Trapper about avoiding the “convertible “ cabins. They can transmit noise. A word about the baths so you won’t be surprised. They are small. The shower is very nice, in fact nicer than we currently have on Seabourn Sojourn. The rest of the bath is quite compact though nicely done. Have fun!🍸😎

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My partner & I did the SDI TA Malaga to Barbados last Oct for our 1st SD experience, it was fabulous. We're booked on SDII this year and soooo looking forward to it. The rooms are small but the experience outweighs any tiny bathroom, I agree the shower is a nice size. The yacht is your balcony.

 

 

 

We also came from doing large suites on big ships and were very disappointed, that's how we found Seadream. Our very 1st cruise was Seabourn back in the mid 90's and we tried to get the same experience but traveling with lots of family they wanted larger ships hence we booked larger and larger suites but still, yuk.

 

 

 

Luckily I don't get seasick but my partner does in rougher weather. You certainly feel the ocean but I absolutely love it, you really know you're sailing, it's what you miss on the large ships. Patches work really well for him, we also gave some to our next door neighbors, since they didn't bring motion sickness medication with them.

 

 

Try it, you'll love it !

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Just to second many of the above comments...

 

We are regulars on the transatlantic routes, and have done 2 per year for the past 5 years or so. We have experienced very rough weather on only one crossing. Some of the others have been moderately rough, but I wouldn't classify them as overly rough. And several have been very smooth.

 

Like Thumper69 above, we love the feel of the ocean.

 

My wife does tend to be subject to motion sickness, and she takes a Bonine daily. She has only had one incident where she has had a slight problem for one night. On all other trips, she has been just fine and has had no symptoms. So, as you said, bring Bonine, and take it daily to prevent an issue.

 

SeaDream ships are older, and I think that they have some stabilizers (but I am not sure), but not nearly what newer ships have. You made the right decision about Deck 2 -- we have always stayed on Deck 2. There is less motion in the lower parts of the ship.

 

Enjoy the trip..

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SeaDream ships are older, and I think that they have some stabilizers (but I am not sure), but not nearly what newer ships have. ..

Yes, the SD ships do indeed have stabilizers. Bear in mind however that stabilizers reduce motion, they don't eliminate it.

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On ‎8‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 1:11 AM, VistasBe said:

Hello. We have just booked a cruise on SD2 for my DH birthday and after 20 plus years of cruising we are ready to try something new. We understand that SD is “Yachting Not Cruising” and that’s fine with us. This year we sailed on HALL MS Eurodam (Neptune Suite) which cost us as much as a deck 2 category on SD without being all inclusive 😟 and were very dissatisfied with the overall experience for the cost. We were happy to discover SD.

 

Where we need some guidance is how bad is bad when it comes to motion sickness on these yachts? Do they have stabalizers and if not what has been your experience regarding their ability to handle rough seas? We do take sea sickness meds as needed and wear wrist bands but we don’t want to be taking meds the whole week and not enjoying the complete experience. Some reviews have indicated issues with the ship rolling to the point that most guests were sick and ports were continually adjusted to minimize the weather issues. Port adjustments are not an issue for us we appreciate safety first. Any feedback or advice from the SD community would be appreciated. Thanks and happy yachting!

 

Hello ctbjr1309,

This is an old post but I cannot pass it by.

The Neptune suite on MS Eurodam costs about $ 7,000 grand total for a 7-day cruise.

The occupants will pay for the luxury of cruising in a cabin that is 2-3 times larger than a standard balcony cabin. Nothing more, and nothing less. Nothing remotely close to Neptine suites is available on Sea Dream ships.

The Eurodam delivers outstanding value for money. The only exception is about 14% of cabins that are suites of all categories. Nothing at sea is worth $7,000 for a 7-day cruise.

The price one pays for a cabin on the Eurodam is not all inclusive, but even the cheapest cabin includes one important thing: the ship.

SD cabins do not.

As to motion of the smallest ship.

As one can guess - the worst.

For me it's an attractive part of the "Yachting Not Cruising" experience.

 

Hope you have had a great cruise on Sea Dream since the time of the original post.

 

I am intrigued by some SD itineraries and trying to find reasons to justify the price.. 🙂

 

Happy cruising!

 

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8 hours ago, ronbe65 said:

I am intrigued by some SD itineraries and trying to find reasons to justify the price.. 🙂


 

95 reasons to sail on SeaDream: the crew

2000 more reasons: the additional people you will find on the Eurodam who won't be on SeaDream

Edited by TrapperZimmy

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31 minutes ago, TrapperZimmy said:

95 reasons to sail on SeaDream: the crew

2000 more reasons: the additional people you will find on the Eurodam who won't be on SeaDream

👍

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14 hours ago, TrapperZimmy said:

95 reasons to sail on SeaDream: the crew

2000 more reasons: the additional people you will find on the Eurodam who won't be on SeaDream

👍🏻👍🏻🥂

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On 11/4/2018 at 9:30 PM, TrapperZimmy said:

95 reasons to sail on SeaDream: the crew

2000 more reasons: the additional people you will find on the Eurodam who won't be on SeaDream

I like this answer.

However I need to add something.

Another thing that draw my attention to the original post: the Euridam is the least suitable example to show the difference between the "yachting" and "cruising".

It's not an easy task to find those 2000 on the Eurodam (and her sister ship).

The single most special thing about these two ships: "A real cruise ship that feels like a private yacht".

I fully understand what you mean 

No surprise as stereotypes rule the world of cruising. These two ships are unique.

 

I am doing my SD homework.

Besides a few rather informative videos, I have "attended" a SD webinar for travel agents.

It's a pleasure to see a lady from SD be so passionate about the product they sell.

How different it is from lazy HAL presentations (it looks like they don't understand and love their own ships!)

This is what she said (approximately): "Yachting is not about indoors, it's about outdoors!" This is exactly what I say about those two HAl ships.

She says: "On SD ships, there is no need for balconies because the whole ship is your balcony!"

It's exactly what the Eurodam product is: book the cheapest inside cabin, and the whole ship is yours.

Amazing.

I've had a good insight into SD product so far.

This experience just reinforced my vision of what is what about cruise ships.

 

Thank you all and happy cruising!

 

 

Edited by ronbe65

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