Jump to content

Silversea Water Cooler: Welcome! Part Five


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Emtbsam said:

Since so many of you are excellent chefs, what knives do you like?

 

We (Ann, mostly) has a knife collection dating back to  New York City culinary schools in the mid-1970s, mostly full-tanged professional Sabatiers, with a  Henckel bread knife and and a C&C chef's knife.  School ID tapes still attached.

 

20201118_230530.thumb.jpg.ed631a6534f67b9bf2a7f56f612fefa6.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a knife set from Bed, Bath & Beyond.......gives me everything I need but I am not in the

cooking category of some of the experts on here.  I know German knives are supposed to be

in the top category but they are way more $$$ than I want to spend. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, FlyingScotSailors said:

Since so many of you are excellent chefs, what knives do you like?

 

I bought the Calphalon Classic Self-Sharpening 15-Piece Cutlery Set with SharpIN™ Technology..

Love them .. reasonably priced (under $200.00)... nice wight.. but most importantly they do the job!

 

Joseph

knife.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rucrazy said:

 

I bought the Calphalon Classic Self-Sharpening 15-Piece Cutlery Set with SharpIN™ Technology..

Love them .. reasonably priced (under $200.00)... nice wight.. but most importantly they do the job!

 

Joseph

knife.jpg

My set looks like this (sort of). Block style but my shears are in a different spot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh still has her Sabatier (sp?) set that she bought in the late 70s.  I must say that the width of her favourite blades have reduced somewhat over the years. In fact one of them is little more than a skewer now. 

 

I prefer a No15 disposable scalpel but they're no good for veg. Apparently. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, zqtchas said:

sharp ones!

 

OMG... no wonder I enjoyed our lunches on the Shadow so much; we're both such smart a**es.  Before reading any responses I literally thought the same thing as you.

Sorry for the digression emtbsam!

Edited by Stumblefoot
Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother gave me a wonderful set of Sabatier carbon steel knives for my thirtieth birthday, and I still use them.  Bob is expert at keeping them sharp, and they have served me well.  

 

Mysty - my sister sent me this link which I found amusing.

 

  https://www.autoblog.com/2020/11/18/canada-alberta-moose-licking-salt-from-cars/

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Emtbsam said:

My mother gave me a wonderful set of Sabatier carbon steel knives for my thirtieth birthday, and I still use them.  Bob is expert at keeping them sharp, and they have served me well.  

 

Mysty - my sister sent me this link which I found amusing.

 

  https://www.autoblog.com/2020/11/18/canada-alberta-moose-licking-salt-from-cars/

 

Thanks EMT.  And yes, folks need to heed the bottom line.....never attempt to push the moose away!  😄

Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents gave me a Le Creuset casserole, a French chefs knife and a Sabatier paring knife when I moved out of home. Still have them, use them most days and they will probably see me out. Quality is king.

DW calls my Le Creuset the 'concrete pot' but it is the go to utensil for her wonderful ragu sauce which goes into the best lasagne ever.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, QueSeraSera said:

we bought a private label (off-brand) Dutch Oven maybe 6 months ago and it will soon be filling up our local landfill, next one will be Le Creuset, or, what about Lodge?

 

 

Que, maybe use the Dutch Oven you don't care for as a planter.  Save the earth!  😁

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, mysty said:

use the Dutch Oven you don't care for as a planter

Will do Mysty, great idea, the outside still looks good (inside not so much)

 

2 minutes ago, rucrazy said:

Le Creuset ist still my first choice

Thanks, gonna go with that.  Only question now is if I can pass off the French replacement as a Christmas present for my OH

Link to post
Share on other sites

We're pretty serious about cooking around here.  We have quite a collection of Le Creuset, some dating back 25 years.  They are a pleasure to use - good heat distribution, no TOO heavy, well made, good fit on the lids.  Let's see, sauce pan (2 qt?) w/ lid, big saute pan w/ lid, deep oval roasting pan w/ lid, and three different pots up to quite large.  (A few were gifts from family, the big ones don't see a lot of use, cooking for two.)  Buy them on sale - not cheap, but will outlast you; so hand them down.  Another thing we like is clay pots made by Emile Henry, also from France.  The potato pot is wonderful - a spherical pot in two pieces that fit together to make a sphere with flat area at each pole, about size of basketball.  You put in 3-4# of plain, washed potatoes, a clove of garlic (unpeeled!) and a bay leaf, put on burner - low for 5 min, then to medium (we have gas).  After 15 min, you flip it over (other end of the basketball), and repeat 15 minutes later.  Total 45 minutes, simple potatoes have been transformed into something truly wonderful.  Hard to describe, but you want to eat them like candy; miraculous.  We also have Emile Henry's tagine pot (which we like a great deal), and a chicken roasting item, like a deep pie dish but which has a 6" high protrusion in the middle.  You rather ignominiously plop the poor bird (I mean a whole, cleaned chicken) down over the protrusion (which conducts heat into the middle), so bird is in normal (legs down) sort of squatting position.  I put a little water in the bottom, although not necessary.  Sometimes we put a bed of onions and carrots just for fun.  My wife thinks basting is important, so I humor her.  Chicken comes out wonderfully done, crispy skin all around, moist meat.  Yum.  For decades we did the Marcella Hazen simple roast a chicken with a lemon inside - always fabulous.  This EH chicken roasting thing gives her recipe a run for the money.   And yes, we have all the groovy knives; I used to cook in a French restaurant, after all.  But many of my favorite knives I get at marine supply houses on the Oregon coast, where they sell knives to use on boats that stay at sea for long periods (with serious, no nonsense cooks aboard, feeding three squares to the hungry fisherpersons), and also for cleaning and prepping fish and seafood.  Some have white nylon handles (Challenger brand) that fit your hand perfectly (so your hand doesn't slip when you are cleaning 500 ling cod during your grueling 8 hour shift at the fish processing plant).  And you have to have the 5" blade serrated edge round end knife if for nothing else than cutting those warm, fully ripe tomatoes just off the vine, without damaging the skin or flesh.  Also good for those cukes that pop up overnight in midsummer like mushrooms.  I'm going to miss cooking, when I'm on my death bed (hopefully not until after quite a few more cruises); but I will have the solace of knowing that lemons are proof that there is a loving God, and that she cares deeply about us humans.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with Alberto Aliberti, President of Atlas Ocean Voyages
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with RiverCruising, the River Cruise Experts
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...