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Silversea Water Cooler: Welcome! Part Five


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40 minutes ago, Stumblefoot said:

That one is definitely a Moose.

 

So the distinguishing element is the formation of the rack Stumble?  If so, I learned something.  I'm not an animal person (meaning I'm not a fan of animals) and I don't tend to pay them very much mind.

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Oh mysty - I had you down as a dog and/or cat lover,  judging by your funnies, some of which certainly have the characters of dogs and cats down to a T.  (OK, I know you didn't do them yourself). 

 

I admit I could not tell which was which between and elk and a moose by the antlers - we don't get too many of either over here.  Lots of deer, very attractive but sadly overfond of eating  your favourite plants if they overhang the edge of your garden.

 

Lola

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2 hours ago, lincslady said:

Oh mysty - I had you down as a dog and/or cat lover,  judging by your funnies, some of which certainly have the characters of dogs and cats down to a T.  (OK, I know you didn't do them yourself). 

 

I admit I could not tell which was which between and elk and a moose by the antlers - we don't get too many of either over here.  Lots of deer, very attractive but sadly overfond of eating  your favourite plants if they overhang the edge of your garden.

 

Lola

 

 

I do enjoy animal funnies Lola.  I'm just not a fan of the live ones.  Be be clear, I would never hurt one!  All bets are off with insects though!  Especially those I find in my living space!  😁

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Now that we can go places again.....  Enjoy!
         
I have been in many places in my life but I've never been in Cahoots. Apparently, you can't go alone. You have to be in Cahoots with someone.
 
I've also never been in Cognito, but I hear no one recognizes you there.
 
I have, however, been in Sane. They don't have an airport; you have to be driven there. I have made several trips there, thanks to my friends and family. I live close so it's a short drive.
 
I would like to go to Conclusions, but you have to jump, and I'm not too much on physical activity anymore.
 
I have also been in Doubt. That is a sad place to go and I try not to visit there too often.
 
I've been in Flexible, but only when it was very important to stand firm.
 
Sometimes I'm in Capable, and I go there more often as I'm getting older.
 
One of my favorite places to be is in Suspense! It really gets the adrenaline flowing and pumps up the old heart! At my age I need all the stimuli I can get!
 
And, sometimes I think I am in Vincible, but life shows me I am not.
 
People keep telling me I'm in Denial, but I'm positive I've never been there before!
 
So far, I haven't been in Continent,  but my travel agent says it's on the list.
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This is Canada Day.  For the first time in my life I am torn over the thought of celebrating this day.  On May 27, 2021 a dark part of our country's history rose up, grabbed us by the collar and gave us a seismic shake.

"Preliminary findings from a survey of the grounds at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School have uncovered the remains of 215 children buried at the site, the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said Thursday.

The First Nation said the remains were confirmed last weekend near the city of Kamloops, in B.C.'s southern Interior. "

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/tk-emlúps-te-secwépemc-215-children-former-kamloops-indian-residential-school-1.6043778

 

On Thursday came the second heart-breaking announcement.

"The Cowessess First Nation announced a preliminary finding Thursday of 751 unmarked graves at a cemetery near the former Marieval Indian Residential School.

The Marieval Indian Residential School operated from 1899 to 1997 in the area where Cowessess is now located, about 140 kilometres east of Regina. Children from First Nations in southeast Saskatchewan and southwestern Manitoba were sent to the school."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/cowessess-marieval-indian-residential-school-news-1.6078375

 

For an explanation of this horror.....

"In Canada, the Indian residential school system was a network of mandatory boarding schools for Indigenous peoples. The network was funded by the Canadian government's Department of Indian Affairs and administered by Christian churches. The school system was created to remove Indigenous children from the influence of their own culture and assimilate them into the dominant Canadian culture. Over the course of the system's more than hundred-year existence, around 150,000 children were placed in residential schools nationally. By the 1930s about 30 percent of Indigenous children were believed to be attending residential schools. The number of school-related deaths remains unknown due to incomplete records. Estimates range from 3,200 to over 30,000."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Indian_residential_school_system

 

I am proud to be a Canadian.   I do, however, recognize that our country has made grievous errors and has been reluctant to address and atone for the horrors visited upon the indigenous peoples.  Like the rest of Canadians I don't feel comfortable celebrating this day.
 

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3 hours ago, mysty said:

This is Canada Day.  For the first time in my life I am torn over the thought of celebrating this day.  On May 27, 2021 a dark part of our country's history rose up, grabbed us by the collar and gave us a seismic shake.

"Preliminary findings from a survey of the grounds at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School have uncovered the remains of 215 children buried at the site, the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said Thursday.

The First Nation said the remains were confirmed last weekend near the city of Kamloops, in B.C.'s southern Interior. "

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/tk-emlúps-te-secwépemc-215-children-former-kamloops-indian-residential-school-1.6043778

 

On Thursday came the second heart-breaking announcement.

"The Cowessess First Nation announced a preliminary finding Thursday of 751 unmarked graves at a cemetery near the former Marieval Indian Residential School.

The Marieval Indian Residential School operated from 1899 to 1997 in the area where Cowessess is now located, about 140 kilometres east of Regina. Children from First Nations in southeast Saskatchewan and southwestern Manitoba were sent to the school."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/cowessess-marieval-indian-residential-school-news-1.6078375

 

For an explanation of this horror.....

"In Canada, the Indian residential school system was a network of mandatory boarding schools for Indigenous peoples. The network was funded by the Canadian government's Department of Indian Affairs and administered by Christian churches. The school system was created to remove Indigenous children from the influence of their own culture and assimilate them into the dominant Canadian culture. Over the course of the system's more than hundred-year existence, around 150,000 children were placed in residential schools nationally. By the 1930s about 30 percent of Indigenous children were believed to be attending residential schools. The number of school-related deaths remains unknown due to incomplete records. Estimates range from 3,200 to over 30,000."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Indian_residential_school_system

 

I am proud to be a Canadian.   I do, however, recognize that our country has made grievous errors and has been reluctant to address and atone for the horrors visited upon the indigenous peoples.  Like the rest of Canadians I don't feel comfortable celebrating this day.
 

I like many people around the world have been following this incredible story with bewilderment . I hope that these poor children can be put to rest with dignity love and the respect of the nation.

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3 hours ago, QueSeraSera said:

History is a cruel teacher.  If we would all just listen.

You are so right.....sadly, so many of us human beings do not choose to do that and horrific things continue to happen.

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Statement from Prime Minister Trudeau on Canada Day:

 

"Today, we celebrate our country and everyone who calls it home. We also reflect on everything we have accomplished, and look forward to what more we have to do.

The pandemic has changed our daily lives, taught us hard lessons, and kept us apart. But through this challenge and crisis, Canadians were there for each other. We all – young and old – made personal sacrifices to help keep our communities safe and healthy. We put signs in our windows and banged pots and pans for our front-line health care workers. We ordered takeout and shopped at our local small businesses. And once vaccines became available, we got our shots as soon as possible, so our communities could return to normal.

Hope, hard work, kindness, resilience, and respect. These are the values that Canadians have shown in the face of the pandemic, and today we should celebrate those values and what we’ve overcome. But while we acknowledge our successes, we must also recognize that, for some, Canada Day is not yet a day of celebration.

The horrific findings of the remains of hundreds of children at the sites of former residential schools in British Columbia and Saskatchewan have rightfully pressed us to reflect on our country’s historical failures, and the injustices that still exist for Indigenous peoples and many others in Canada. We as Canadians must be honest with ourselves about our past. And we must recognize that here in Canada there are still people who don’t feel safe walking the streets of their communities, who still don’t have the same opportunities as others, and who still face discrimination or systemic racism in their daily lives.

While we can’t change the past, we must be resolute in confronting these truths in order to chart a new and better path forward. Together, we have a long way to go to make things right with Indigenous peoples. But if we all pledge to do the work – and if we lead with those core values of hard work, kindness, resilience, and respect – we can achieve reconciliation and build a better Canada for everyone.

What makes Canada special is not the belief that this is the best country in the world, but the knowledge that we could be. And whether it’s finishing the fight against COVID-19, tackling the climate crisis, or walking the path of reconciliation, I know there is no challenge too great, if we face it together. Because the progress we’ve made as a country didn’t happen by accident, and it won’t continue without effort.

This Canada Day, let’s recommit to learning from and listening to each other so we can break down the barriers that divide us, rectify the injustices of our past, and build a more fair and equitable society for everyone. Together, we will roll up our sleeves and do the hard work that is necessary to build a better Canada.

From my family to yours, happy Canada Day."

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As Cooler folk know, I struggled with the celebration of Canada Day this year due to the recent discovery of the bones of children buried on the sites of residential schools.  Today I was sent a link to a song which filled my heart with pride and compassion and filled my eyes with tears. The song was composed by Ellis Craig, an 83-year-old resident of a retirement home in Perth, Ontario.  We Are Canadian.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGxubfv_pgY

 


WE ARE CANADIAN!

We came from the beginning, shrouded mists of time and space,
And in this vast and northern clime each found our sacred place.
We were the first to touch this earth, the people of the land,
We lit the flame and then became the first Canadians!

 

We came on ships across the sea, found others here before.
We pushed frontiers three hundred years, a new world to explore.
From sea to sea to Arctic sea, found how far we extend,
We blazed the trails and laid the rails – the next Canadians!

 

The maple leaf upon our flag, the poppies John McCrae,
The silver cup Lord Stanley and the chalice from Earl Grey.
Our Snowbirds soaring up the sky and Terry on the run.
As one we stand we built this land – we are Canadian!

 

Voyageurs in birch bark canoes who braved the wilderness.
Men of the Northwest Mounted marching out to tame the West.
The railroad running underground toward the northern sun,
We are the True North Strong and Free –we are Canadian!

 

We are Bishop in the air and to keep our country free,
Took the Ridge called Vimy, came ashore at Normandy.
Warriors shedding blood and tears, the ones who did not bend,
We line the Heroes Highway – we are Canadian!

 

We are our schooner Bluenose, the poppies John McCrae,
The silver cup Lord Stanley and the chalice from Earl Grey.
Our Snowbirds soaring up the sky and Terry on the run.
As one we stand we built this land – we are Canadian!

 

Roberta Bondar, Clara Hughes, Buffy Ste. Marie.
Viola Desmond on our Ten, Lucy Maud Montgomery.
The suffragettes who won their fight to vote beside the men.
Women standing proud and tall – we are Canadian!

 

We are the broken treaties and the promises not kept,
Stains upon our hist’ry, the tears still being wept.
We are also Gord Downie, who vowed to make amends,
When made aware we learn to care – we are Canadian!

 

Chris Hatfield’s vista sea to sea, the poppies John McCrae,
The silver cup Lord Stanley and the chalice from Earl Grey.
Our Snowbirds soaring up the sky and Terry on the run.
As one we stand we built this land – we are Canadian!

 

All now keepers of the flame, we share this mighty land,
With those from every place on Earth who now beside us stand.
We all live on this blessed soil that to death we will defend.
Diversified yet unified – we are Canadian!

 

We welcome those who seek our shores, the comers who are new.
Every one of us through time from elsewhere came like you.
And down the years the message grows your sons and daughters send:
As one we stand we built this land – we are Canadian!

As one we stand we built this land – we are Canadian!


As one we stand we LOVE this land – we are Canadian!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This song made me realize that warts and all I love this land and I will do my part to make it even better.

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On 7/1/2021 at 3:25 AM, mysty said:

This is Canada Day.  For the first time in my life I am torn over the thought of celebrating this day.  On May 27, 2021 a dark part of our country's history rose up, grabbed us by the collar and gave us a seismic shake.

"Preliminary findings from a survey of the grounds at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School have uncovered the remains of 215 children buried at the site, the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said Thursday.

The First Nation said the remains were confirmed last weekend near the city of Kamloops, in B.C.'s southern Interior. "

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/tk-emlúps-te-secwépemc-215-children-former-kamloops-indian-residential-school-1.6043778

 

On Thursday came the second heart-breaking announcement.

"The Cowessess First Nation announced a preliminary finding Thursday of 751 unmarked graves at a cemetery near the former Marieval Indian Residential School.

The Marieval Indian Residential School operated from 1899 to 1997 in the area where Cowessess is now located, about 140 kilometres east of Regina. Children from First Nations in southeast Saskatchewan and southwestern Manitoba were sent to the school."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/cowessess-marieval-indian-residential-school-news-1.6078375

 

For an explanation of this horror.....

"In Canada, the Indian residential school system was a network of mandatory boarding schools for Indigenous peoples. The network was funded by the Canadian government's Department of Indian Affairs and administered by Christian churches. The school system was created to remove Indigenous children from the influence of their own culture and assimilate them into the dominant Canadian culture. Over the course of the system's more than hundred-year existence, around 150,000 children were placed in residential schools nationally. By the 1930s about 30 percent of Indigenous children were believed to be attending residential schools. The number of school-related deaths remains unknown due to incomplete records. Estimates range from 3,200 to over 30,000."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Indian_residential_school_system

 

I am proud to be a Canadian.   I do, however, recognize that our country has made grievous errors and has been reluctant to address and atone for the horrors visited upon the indigenous peoples.  Like the rest of Canadians I don't feel comfortable celebrating this day.
 

We feel the same as you Mysty.....heartbreaking and horrific!

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