Jump to content

Silversea Water Cooler: Welcome! Part Five


CCHelp
 Share

Recommended Posts

29 minutes ago, Will Work for Tiramisu said:

I was going to make an innocent post about how I started every day while cruising:  Get up, go get a latte for my dear wife to enjoy in bed, then I walk laps on the deck for an hour.  The theory was that I could then eat and drink my way through the day without having to buy a new belt.  Nice theory - an hour of walking is probably good for about one G&T.  

 

When I opened the window to write the above, the below popped up, I think from a cut and paste about a topic I was going to respond to elsewhere on the SS forum site a week or so ago.  You never know what will happen with these damn computers!  It might be of some interest, so what the heck.  This forum is like Calvinball - you make the rules up as you go!!  

 

Regarding UK Jeff's interesting post about seizure of British citizens from the coast for the slave trade, the choke point of the Straits of Gibraltar were a perfect place for the Barbary States to harass and seize ships, and hold their crews for ransom, or to sell or keep as slaves.  After the Revolutionary War, the US was no long under the protection of the British Navy, and thus vessels were subject to ongoing attacks of its shipping in this area.  Under Jefferson, a policy was undertaken to solve this problem rather than pay annual tribute to these states (as had been done before, to buy protection).  Some credit this with the creation of what became the permanent US Navy.  Below is a very brief summary, but the full story is quite interesting.  Suggest google Barbary Wars, read all about it.  

 

Various nations encouraged piracy when it made economic or strategic sense.  (Think: Pirates of Penzance.) And of course, it continues to this day, most notably on the eastern coast of Africa.  (Or, think ransomware today.) I have heard the quote "Millions for defense, but not a penny for tribute" ascribed to this conflict, but I think it actually had to do with a diplomatic dust-up the young US had with France.  

 

The First Barbary War (1801–1805), also known as the Tripolitan War and the Barbary Coast War, was the first of two Barbary Wars, in which the United States and Sweden fought against the four North African states known collectively as the "Barbary States". Three of these were autonomous, but nominally provinces of the Ottoman Empire: Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis. The fourth was the independent Sultanate of Morocco.[5]

The cause of the U.S. participation was pirates from the Barbary States seizing American merchant ships and holding the crews for ransom, demanding the U.S. pay tribute to the Barbary rulers. United States President Thomas Jefferson refused to pay this tribute. Sweden had been at war with the Tripolitans since 1800.

 

WWFT,  this is the kind of history lesson I enjoy!  No exam at the end of the course!  Thank you! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, mysty said:

this particular post might be difficult!

Just speaking for myself (I guess we always are, aren't we?) your post was fun and beautiful.  The bond between that dog and that young woman were a joy to behold.

What is difficult is our pet family members live too short lives, they were still learning when they were snatched away, we outlive them but never forget them - somehow they foster such warm emotions. Had to give our 2 shelter dogs an extra pat tonight...

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mysty, 

So much of human history has played out on the high seas, and places like Straits of Gibraltar, English Channel, Straits of Hormuz, etc..  My enjoyment of cruising has been much enhanced by reading about the history (human and natural) that has played out in the areas we are cruising to or through.  So many places I had read about in history books of one type or another, but to see them first hand (whether on cruise ship or on land based trip) is on a different level - it brings it home to you.  Last time we were in Venice, we skipped the usual stuff, and spent a couple hours in their Maritime Museum.  Talk about history - the Venetians, for an extended period, controlled trade between the Far East and Europe, and exacted their toll on that trade.  The fortunes made were hard to imagine, and that is what funded all that cool stuff you see sitting out on that mudflat that is Venice.  

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Will Work for Tiramisu said:

Mysty, 

So much of human history has played out on the high seas, and places like Straits of Gibraltar, English Channel, Straits of Hormuz, etc..  My enjoyment of cruising has been much enhanced by reading about the history (human and natural) that has played out in the areas we are cruising to or through.  So many places I had read about in history books of one type or another, but to see them first hand (whether on cruise ship or on land based trip) is on a different level - it brings it home to you.  Last time we were in Venice, we skipped the usual stuff, and spent a couple hours in their Maritime Museum.  Talk about history - the Venetians, for an extended period, controlled trade between the Far East and Europe, and exacted their toll on that trade.  The fortunes made were hard to imagine, and that is what funded all that cool stuff you see sitting out on that mudflat that is Venice.  

 

 

 

WWFT,  history was never my thing in school.  I did well in it but it sparked no interest.   My thing was Math.  However,  once Myster and I began to explore the world,  history rang bells that never chimed in school.  I guess as I'm aging,  history is becoming more of an interest.   In the absence of having to memorize dry meaningless bits it is becoming more alive!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Will Work for Tiramisu said:

Regarding UK Jeff's interesting post about seizure of British citizens from the coast for the slave trade, the choke point of the Straits of Gibraltar were a perfect place for the Barbary States to harass and seize ships, and hold their crews for ransom, or to sell or keep as slaves.  After the Revolutionary War, the US was no long under the protection of the British Navy, and thus vessels were subject to ongoing attacks of its shipping in this area.  Under Jefferson, a policy was undertaken to solve this problem rather than pay annual tribute to these states (as had been done before, to buy protection).  Some credit this with the creation of what became the permanent US Navy.  Below is a very brief summary, but the full story is quite interesting.  Suggest google Barbary Wars, read all about it.  

 

Various nations encouraged piracy when it made economic or strategic sense.  (Think: Pirates of Penzance.) And of course, it continues to this day, most notably on the eastern coast of Africa.  (Or, think ransomware today.) I have heard the quote "Millions for defense, but not a penny for tribute" ascribed to this conflict, but I think it actually had to do with a diplomatic dust-up the young US had with France.  

 

The First Barbary War (1801–1805), also known as the Tripolitan War and the Barbary Coast War, was the first of two Barbary Wars, in which the United States and Sweden fought against the four North African states known collectively as the "Barbary States". Three of these were autonomous, but nominally provinces of the Ottoman Empire: Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis. The fourth was the independent Sultanate of Morocco.[5]

The cause of the U.S. participation was pirates from the Barbary States seizing American merchant ships and holding the crews for ransom, demanding the U.S. pay tribute to the Barbary rulers. United States President Thomas Jefferson refused to pay this tribute. Sweden had been at war with the Tripolitans since 1800.

 

Thanks for remembering my interest in the inconvenient real history of slavery.  It saddens me how little respect is shown to trying to understand as best we can the factual historical context of where we are today.  And is there anything more racist than an accusation of being "unconsciously racists"?  If you try to defend yourself you are accused of proving the point vis-à-vis your unconsciousness of your own condition.  An accusation for which there appears no reasonable defence.  Still, let us not dwell.

 

And on the subject of "ransomware" in my bemused and sometimes bewildered mind you may recall way back in March and April last year when I was genuinely concerned and alarmed at the number of SS CC'ers who I felt were in some financial danger of optimistically contemplating the actractiveness of FCC on the basis that they would be using their FCC by taking SS cruises by August or October 2020 at the very latest and I suggested that covid was in my belief existential, and that no cruises would be being taken for considerably longer.  I also suggested that there would be an increasing imperative for cruise lines to increase prices to FCC holders because the longer it went on the more critical opening up would become with cruises being operated at full cost but with few cash customers, FCC being the predominant customers.  I suggested that any FCC benefit would be wiped out and that customers would be forced to pay higher prices to get the benefit of their FCC or lose it.  What a lot of flak I received.  There was a lot of posting about confidence in "fair play" and that there would be no exploitation of long-term customers who wished to support by taking FCC rather than refunds.  There was a fair degree of smugness around about how lucky and clever people were and I received some nasty flak about expressing these concerns.  I'm not clear where this turned out to be bad concern on my part. 

 

"Ransomeware" takes many forms. 

 

🙂

 

 

Edited by UKCruiseJeff
shpelling errers
  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/6/2021 at 11:38 AM, silkismom said:

This is Fran Whyte's version of Singapore Sling:       1oz gin, 1oz brandy, 1oz lemon juice, 3/4 oz grenadine, 1oz sloe gin, soda, pour over ice cubes.

Thank you silkismom!  The result:


image.png.da9959b0b4fe05daf9c562a078612ea7.png

 

And tastes great.  Did not have sloe gin though, so used some Heering liqueur we had on hand & got away with that, and added a cherry (always looking for an excuse to do that).  Next visit to the ABC store I'll pick up some sloe gin ☺️

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/5/2021 at 5:45 PM, jpalbny said:

 

Plymouth is definitely tasty. Have gone through a few bottles ourselves... Brokers is our go-to London Dry Gin that we enjoy. But finding the right gin is only half of the fun. Then you get to pair it with the right tonic, and the right garnish! We keep the local distributor of Fever Tree tonics in business. Brokers goes well with plain Indian tonic in the summer but in the winter it's great with aromatic tonic. Add a piece of cinnamon stick or some allspice berries, and it's a great holiday spritz.

 

We like to keep a number of different gins on hand so we can mix it up. Empress 1908 and Magellan are favorites, especially good with elderflower tonic. I like Tanqueray No. 10 with Mediterranean tonic - in fact, I like it better than plain Tanqueray. Hendrick's Midsummer Solstice, with Mediterranean tonic and a sprig of fresh rosemary, is great during those long summer nights. 

 

We recently tried a French gin called G'vine, made from grapes, which is very nice. And on occasion we get an Italian one called Malfy, which comes in several different flavors. Their blood orange flavored gin, mixed with Mediterranean tonic, is a fair approximation of an Aperol spritz.

 

Nolet's Silver is another one that we have on occasion - the flavor profile is fairly unique. I add a whole raspberry for a treat at the bottom of the glass, and mix it with light tonic so as to let the subtle flavors of the gin express themselves.

@jpalbnySorry I went dark - it's been a wild week. 

 

Those gins look amazing! Will have to give them a try. Turns out that DW and I were recently gifted a bottle of Nolet's Silver - may just open that tonight! 

 

I'm guessing you've discovered https://theginisin.com/?

 

If you ever make it to Plymouth, England, a visit to the Plymouth Gin Distillery is not to be missed. Totally fascinating and legend has it that the pilgrims spent their last night in England in that building.

 

On yet another alcohol related note, DW and I are heading to Saint Helena for a long weekend to participate in a wine blending event at VGS Chateau Potelle. (VGS stands for Very Good S... 😎). Will post a photo or too next week!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/5/2021 at 4:41 PM, QueSeraSera said:

Wow, please update when you have a chance to read.  I never realized the theological aspects of the Athenian civilization till I did my study. 

Retirement is a good place to be, but not till you're ready for it, I think.  I took up a 2nd career as a high school science teacher cause I retired from engineering too early 🙂 

Plato is a very big topic. I've long been fascinated by Pythagoras, not so much as a mathematician but as a philosophical / spiritual leader. So I finally said to myself that as Plato mentions Pythagoras all of the time, I should take the leap. I initially listened to a lot of unabridged readings from libravox while commuting. It gets a person a few funny looks when listening to plato with the top down a convertible! 🤣

 

I've really come to love the translations by Thomas Taylor, the late 18th early 19th century "English Platonist" who was the first to translate all of Plato into English. Quite a character, placed on the verboten list because of the notion (probably correct) that he had become pagan. There are those that argue that, while he may not of known the most Greek, but he knew Plato better than most other translators. You can find his works for sale in the US in Opening Mind Associates or in the UK by the Prometheus Trust. These editions of Plato also contain very large sections of commentaries by the Neoplatonists. I know not everyone approves of them but they are quite lovely really.

 

 

Taylor translated a lot more than Plato and wrote some of his own works. It was amazing to visit Elefsina, home of the Eleusinian Mysteries after reading Taylor's book on them. When DW and I head to Greece next year (twice!) I plan on lugging along relevant bits copied from Pausanias’ Guide to Greece.

 

My favorites right now are:

  • Proclus' Elements of Theology - this is the easiest way to get started with the Neoplatonists
  • Oracles and Mysteries - contains a translation of the Chaldaen Oracles.
  • Hymns and Initiations - translation of the Orphic Hymns
  • Iamblichus On the Mysteries and Life of Pythagoras

Earlier in the year I finished the two volume Proclus' "Commentary on the Timaeus of Plato" - incredible but a bit of an investment of time as they way in at 544 pages each. 🙀

 

Another thing I've had fun with is watching Pierre Grime's lectures on Plato and Proclus. Really quite accessible considering. Here's a good one https://archive.org/details/19951114NSPRS012

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: AmaWaterways Announces an Extended Season on the Douro River
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...