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Silversea Water Cooler: Welcome! Part Five


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Not to usurp Mysty, but had to share this. I could totally see Ashley (our sweet girl who we lost 3 years ago) doing this.

 

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Actually a funny Ashley story. When they were remodeling our master bathroom, the shower controller needed to be hooked to the network and programmed. I stopped by to check on it and saw the foreman sitting on the floor in our office, with his laptop hooked up to do the programming...and Ashley was flopped in his lap! Miss that girl.

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When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.


Jenny Joseph

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31 minutes ago, Will Work for Tiramisu said:

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.


Jenny Joseph

 

Awesome  WWFT!  Love this!  Thank you! 🥰

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1 hour ago, mysty said:

 

It's all about priorities Jazz! 😁

So here's my mind working in mysterious ways again:  LBJ promised us that we could have 'guns and butter' – so there's obviously room for 2 'top' priorities.  Oh wait, he discovered that he couldn't deliver on that promise.   Nevermind, wine it is!!!

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On 10/14/2021 at 11:22 AM, mysty said:

 

And your thoughts drron?  

A beautiful,smooth gin.Unfortunately too easy to drink.The best of the Tasmanian gins I have tried.Although I have tasted a few as since the pandemic began I have worked here for over a year.There are literally hundreds of Tasmanian gins now.

 

 

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I hesitated to post this poem, knowing that 95% of you have seen it, but it was a surprise to me when I saw it, 10 years or so ago, so thought there might still be one or two who haven't seen it.  Note the existence of the "Red Hat Society", which came about from this poem.  Was written in 1961, the author (from England) was 28 at the time, and the name of the poem is "Warning".  I would have great fun writing a "male" version of this, but I will spare you the result. I think the universal appeal to this obviously has to do with a younger person looking forward to when they are of a certain age, and how they will behave - and make up for the "sobriety of their youth"!   And I think we all hope, we have "miles to go before we sleep".  I think we all applaud Jenny's attitude, regarding not going into that good night without kicking and screaming, making a fuss, and being a general nuisance!!  

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1 hour ago, drron29 said:

A beautiful,smooth gin.Unfortunately too easy to drink.The best of the Tasmanian gins I have tried.Although I have tasted a few as since the pandemic began I have worked here for over a year.There are literally hundreds of Tasmanian gins now.

That would also be my review of Silent Pool gin from England.  Except the 'too easy to drink' part – what is that about???  [Silent Pool goes great with FeverTree Elderflower Tonic, both kept in fridge so no dilution from that dreaded ice stuff...]

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So pleased that those of you who did not know this poem have read it - I have tried  to live up to it since my DIL gave it to me quite a few years ago at 70, and am managing to live up to some of it,  except to substitute bright pink trousers for a red hat.

 

Lola

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Ron, that gin looks great! I'd definitely try some if I could find it. I don't see it available at any stores near me.

 

A similar but less expensive substitute would be Empress 1908, also made with the same pea flower extract which gives it such a beautiful color. It gets lighter and pinker after adding acid (tonic, citrus). And despite what they say on the Gingle Bells website, it's very tasty.

 

Thinking that I'll make tarte flambée for dinner tonight. We have a Crémant d'Alsace rosé which is in desperate need of disgorgement. I just need to make a quick grocery stop for crème fraîche. And then the pharmacy, for atorvastatin. Happy weekend all!

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Ah, gin!  Proof that God wants us to be happy, doesn't she!  While the alcohol has its role, for me it is the botanicals that are of most interest.  I was thrilled to try my first bottle of Hendrix - yum!  Increasingly I find I'm more drawn to the botanicals than the alcohol. If you crack open that door, there is a world of flavors behind it.  Near the top of my list is Fernet Branca, an Italian concoction that some detractors say tastes like creosote & black strap molasses.  (OK, I made that up.)  But if you enjoy savoring complex flavors, it really grows on you.  We recently bought some Cynar, an obscure liquor made from artichokes; I'd take a glug of that before I strapped on the snowshoes, any day!  

 

Two books that are worth reading, on this topic:  "The Drunken Botanist - The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks", by Amy Stewart (NYT Bestseller), and "Botany at the Bar - The Art & Science of Making Bitters", by Selena Ahmed, Ashley Duval & Rachel Meyer.  Like so many things in life, there are people who have devoted their lives to such topics, and I tip my fedora to them.  The first title is impressive - you'll score a few more points at your next trivia game, for sure.  The second is directed more at DIY bitter making, but still full of info on the numerous plants from all over the world that get called to duty to flavor our apres 5 pm tipples.  

 

The last 20 years has really seen a rebirth of mixology, and interest in the craft of mixing drinks.  I'd go so far as to say we are (or were until covid came along) in a Golden Era of mixology.  Once we have this pandemic behind us, we'll all be ready to make our own version of the Roaring Twenties, and the mixologists and providers of wonderful ingredients will be ready to help us celebrate joie de vivre!  Salud!

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