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Emotional Support Animals No Longer Allowed on Royal Caribbean Cruise Ships

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Wonderful! I think that the 'faking it' people finally added the straw that broke the camels back as in the last six months we've seen some pretty major companies (Delta, Southwest, etc.) start combating this craziness.

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Wonderful! I think that the 'faking it' people finally added the straw that broke the camels back as in the last six months we've seen some pretty major companies (Delta, Southwest, etc.) start combating this craziness.

 

Well those Straws aren’t allowed anymore either :cool:

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Glad to see it! I don't believe that an ADA certificate is easy to fake. It is not even close to the same thing as this nonsense with peoples pets that a lot of us have seen. I thought it was so offensive when I saw the dog in the baby stroller. I sincerely hope that this stops this nonsense.

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Is there a site for verification of certificates?
Legitimate service dogs don't require certification. The fake certs I've seen advertised are for emotional support dogs. The only special treatment emotional support dogs are entitled to is for housing. They don't have the same rights as service dogs.

 

Sent from my SM-G930V using Forums mobile app

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+1 for no more yappy dogs in strollers. We had a real annoying one on our cruise. Both the dog and owner.

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It's about time they brought some clarity to this situation.

 

Hopefully they don’t ban my emotional support wife or cigarettes.

Edited by Magnetchief

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This is good, but as some above have alluded to, this is a VERY tough policy to enforce. There is no ADA certificate for a service dog--merely a definition. Under the ADA, a service animal is defined as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. The task(s) performed by the dog must be directly related to the person's disability. See more here.

 

Moreover, businesses are not permitted require documentation/proof that a dog has been certified, trained, or otherwise licensed as a service animal, as a condition for entry. Additionally, they may ask only two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Businesses may not request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

The requirements are made lenient so as to not create an additional impediment to those who rightfully need the services of a service animal. However, this means that the rules are easily flouted by bad actors. And truthfully, the people who use these rules to their advantage without the proper need are BAD people. It creates more distrust and difficulty for those people who use legitimate service animals.

 

Nonetheless, there will always be rule-breakers, but that doesn't mean the rules shouldn't be in place. If nothing else, hopefully the fact that Royal now has this rule on the books it at least makes one or two people rethink their actions.

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Just another unenforceable policy

 

I disagree. I saw a beautiful scene unfold this summer at a national park lodge in Montana. A man attempted to check in with his "service dog." The manager informed him that they do not allow emotional support animals and only true service animals could stay there. After stating he was allowed to stay at Yellowstone and still being denied he became very belligerent and asked for a higher up. The manager explained he was as high up as there was and the dog was not staying. Never underestimate the power of management that has the guts to take a stand.

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It is about time! I get Service Dogs and have no issue with that.. But people that go out and pay $50 for a certificate to have their dog certified as an "emotional" support dog is BS. People were doing this so they did not have to Kennel their dogs or leave their pets at home. So glad Royal has finally stepped up to the plate and banned them. Hopefully other cruise lines will do the same.

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Well here comes the next 50 threads on why can't I bring my service pig, goat, rabbit, donkey, fish lion, elephant..I'm being discriminated against.......

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Well here comes the next 50 threads on why can't I bring my service pig, goat, rabbit, donkey, fish lion, elephant..I'm being discriminated against.......

 

Oh you KNOW that is going to happen! I am like GET OVER IT!!!

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This is good' date=' but as some above have alluded to, this is a VERY tough policy to enforce. There is no ADA certificate for a service dog--merely a definition. Under the ADA, a service animal is defined as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. The task(s) performed by the dog must be directly related to the person's disability. See more here.

 

Moreover, businesses are not permitted require documentation/proof that a dog has been certified, trained, or otherwise licensed as a service animal, as a condition for entry. Additionally, they may ask only two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Businesses may not request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

The requirements are made lenient so as to not create an additional impediment to those who rightfully need the services of a service animal. However, this means that the rules are easily flouted by bad actors. And truthfully, the people who use these rules to their advantage without the proper need are BAD people. It creates more distrust and difficulty for those people who use legitimate service animals.

 

Nonetheless, there will always be rule-breakers, but that doesn't mean the rules shouldn't be in place. If nothing else, hopefully the fact that Royal now has this rule on the books it at least makes one or two people rethink their actions.

 

A very good explanation, but there are other factors.

 

For example, Delta has banned pit bull breeds in the passenger cabin. The larger question here as you pointed out, is the definition of emotional support animals, not just dogs.. Remember the peacock someone wanted to bring on a plane? So the airlines can deny service, and oddly the airlines are begging the government for some regulations.

 

It will certainly make passengers think twice. If I fly in, and then denied boarding of the animal. What then happens?

 

Interesting discussion. :D

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Good going Royal! Thanks for thinking of all the passengers w/o emotional support dogs and those that have allergies.

 

Yeah! About time RCL.

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Never bothered me seeing dogs on the ship. This new change doesn’t bother me either.

 

To each their own.

 

I’ve always made the best out of all my vacations and will continue to do so.

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A very good explanation, but there are other factors.

 

For example, Delta has banned pit bull breeds in the passenger cabin. The larger question here as you pointed out, is the definition of emotional support animals, not just dogs.. Remember the peacock someone wanted to bring on a plane? So the airlines can deny service, and oddly the airlines are begging the government for some regulations.

 

It will certainly make passengers think twice. If I fly in, and then denied boarding of the animal. What then happens?

 

Interesting discussion. :D

 

The big difference is that the cruise line is only governed by the ADA which specifically excludes ESA's, while the airlines are governed by the ACAA (Air Carrier's Accessibility Act), which specifically allows ESA's.

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The big difference is that the cruise line is only governed by the ADA which specifically excludes ESA's, while the airlines are governed by the ACAA (Air Carrier's Accessibility Act), which specifically allows ESA's.

 

Interesting. Anyone know if the differences are because an airline is a source of transportation (to which no one should be denied) while a cruise ship is a vacation and not merely transportation?

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Interesting. Anyone know if the differences are because an airline is a source of transportation (to which no one should be denied) while a cruise ship is a vacation and not merely transportation?

 

No, because buses and trains are not covered by the ACAA either, and don't recognize ESA's. Not sure why they were allowed under the ACAA, but someone did a good lobbying job.

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Service Animals under ADA are animals that have been trained to perform tasks that assist people with disabilities in everyday life: think a service dog who is trained to open doors for someone in a wheelchair who is not capable of opening the door on their own, or who would struggle significantly doing so. The service animal must perform tasks directly related to the person's disability.

 

Emotional Support Animals are mainly crap. You can go online and get a 'doctor' to say you have emotional issues and need a support animal. Most of us could have any pet certified. These animals and their people may be issues ID cards and certificates but are typically not protected by the ADA.

 

However, it is important to remember two things: not all disabilities are VISIBLE, and the ADA does recognize psychiatric service animals. So this policy will hopefully help discourage people without legitimate disabilities from bringing emotional service animals on board, but please remember not to judge anyone who has an animal and looks 'normal' or 'typical' because you do not know what disability they may have.

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So glad RCI is finally taking a stand on this. I wish the airlines would also.

 

Does anyone know if a service animal occupy's a cabin will that cabin get an extra cleaning before the next passenger occupy's it ?

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