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Seasickness

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I'm really sorry, I know it's been answered before but I can't find it. I have searched & searched and all I am finding on this subject are the US medications named and compared. I have a pack of both Dramamine & a pack of Cyclizine. Both say they'll cause drowsiness. Both appear to work in the same way. Has anyone tried both of these and found that one is better than the other please?

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Either might also interact with alcohol or other medications, which may influence people's ratings of 'better'.

 

Consider Sea Bands, the bracelets that put pressure on the inside of your wrist. Won't interact with meds, or cause drowsiness, and are safe for kids. My adult daughter says she gets relief quickly, especially if she puts them on before she gets too woozy. They are inexpensive and available at most pharmacies and mass merchandisers, and online.

 

Other non-medicine advice is to stay hydrated, and keep caffeine and alcohol in check until you get your 'sea legs'.

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I'm really sorry, I know it's been answered before but I can't find it. I have searched & searched and all I am finding on this subject are the US medications named and compared. I have a pack of both Dramamine & a pack of Cyclizine. Both say they'll cause drowsiness. Both appear to work in the same way. Has anyone tried both of these and found that one is better than the other please?

I'm not familiar with cyclizine, but Dramamine is Dimenhydrinate and can cause drowsiness.

There are other motion sickness meds that don't have the same effect. The generic ingredient in those is meclizine. Bonine is a brand name for one of those products. Also, Dramamine-N is meclizine.

Are you certain you need sea sickness meds? It's not unusual for people to think they'll get sea sick, but they really won't. Cruise ships are very stable and not a lot of motion.

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We have tried both over the years and couldn't really say any one was better than the other. We both use Stugeron now as they don't make us as drowsy. Different products will affect people differently.

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Thank you. Yes indeed I did get seasick and as I never have before my first trip across the Bay of Biscay last September, I actually wasn't expecting to. I was given Stugeron once before, for dizziness caused by an inner ear infection, didn't help much and gave me an almost permanent nose bleed! True enough that everyone could react differently. Maybe I'm just an awkward one...?

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Rather than ask strangers on this forum who don't have a clue whether or not a medication may cause you problems, why not just ask your physician or pharmacist? Although you will find plenty of people on this forum who are eager to give you medical advice.

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Do ask your Doctor, especially as you had a problem with Stugeron for your ear problem.

We're all so different, and probably take other medicines. My OH doesn't find dramomine (Avomine) very effective, so prefers Stugeron, but that's no good for you.

Hope you find a solution via your GP.

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Are you certain you need sea sickness meds? It's not unusual for people to think they'll get sea sick, but they really won't. Cruise ships are very stable and not a lot of motion.

 

While I'll concur that cruise ships are very stable, since this is a requirement of the SOLAS Convention. Depending on where you cruise and the sea conditions, any ship may experience some considerable motion. Having spent over 40 years at sea, mostly on passenger carrying vessels, I have experienced more than a few storms.

 

The modern stabilisers are excellent at dampening rolling motions, but do nothing to prevent pitching, which results from seas ahead or astern. In any head sea, the Captain has 2 choices - slow down or alter course, as the stabilisers do nothing.

 

For OP, DW uses sea bands when not too rough (positioning is critical) and if additional measures are required then she goes to the Scopolomine Patch. While they are available OTC in Canada, on our last trip to UK we noted they are prescription only. She applies these about 12 hrs before required and they last 3 days. She doesn't use either medications you quoted due to drowsiness.

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Definitely talk to your family doctor. He knows you better than any of us do. He knows what medications you take -- if any. He can suggest what will work best for you.

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Have you tried not taking ANYTHING?

Many folks are more worried about becoming seasick than actually do become seasick. ;)

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I'm really sorry, I know it's been answered before but I can't find it. I have searched & searched and all I am finding on this subject are the US medications named and compared. I have a pack of both Dramamine & a pack of Cyclizine. Both say they'll cause drowsiness. Both appear to work in the same way. Has anyone tried both of these and found that one is better than the other please?

 

 

The only product that has ever helped me is Bonine.Although it states on the box that it does not cause one to become drowsy I tend to sleep during the evening shows.

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Either might also interact with alcohol or other medications, which may influence people's ratings of 'better'.

 

Consider Sea Bands, the bracelets that put pressure on the inside of your wrist. Won't interact with meds, or cause drowsiness, and are safe for kids. My adult daughter says she gets relief quickly, especially if she puts them on before she gets too woozy. They are inexpensive and available at most pharmacies and mass merchandisers, and online.

 

Other non-medicine advice is to stay hydrated, and keep caffeine and alcohol in check until you get your 'sea legs'.

 

I second this. My wife can't take any of the meds for medical reasons and ginger gum wasn't cutting it. A tablemate had a seaband and told her about it. We picked one up in the ship's sundries store and it worked great for her.

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Meclizine is a cyclizine derivative, so I'm guessing that's what you're talking about - the trade name its most commonly known by in the US is Bonine.

 

Both meclizine hydrochloride and Dramamine (dimenhydrinate) are sold as antiemetics but are essentially 1st generation antihistamines. Interesting fact - dimenhydrinate, once it enters into the blood stream, will break down into diphendydramine, aka Benadryl

 

Anyways, I am extremely prone to motion sickness and have taken both, but I prefer meclizine. It lasts up to 24 hours vs Dramamine's 6-8 and does not make me sleepy like Dramamine can.

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I second the suggestion that you speak to your GP if you don't find anything that works for you. It is all very well people saying 'you don't get seasick on cruise ships' but that is of little help to those of us who do! Crossing the BoB is known to be uncomfortable for many people, a fact often overlooked by the majority of poster on CC who come from the USA.

 

Having tried a variety of things, I now use the scopolamine patch with good effect - but your milage may vary!

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Ships are floating on the ocean...even with stabilizers, you can feel movement. Slight motion is unlikely to cause too many issues, unless you're VERY prone to motion sickness. There are non-drowsy forms of dramamine....ask at your pharmacy.

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Ships are floating on the ocean...even with stabilizers, you can feel movement. Slight motion is unlikely to cause too many issues, unless you're VERY prone to motion sickness. There are non-drowsy forms of dramamine....ask at your pharmacy.

 

The Less-Drowsy Dramamine is meclizine

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We use Ginger Tablets. We start taking them the day before we board and then continue till we get our sea legs. If queasiness starts then we just start taking them again. It was worked wonders for my hubby who gets very sea sick. Def check with your MD or pharmacist to make sure there are no interactions no matter what you take.

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I have sailed for the last 20 years and never had a problem until I was put on a new medicine about a year ago. I now have problems in the car and sometimes for no reason I can understand. Our last 15 day cruise was horrible for me. I usually use non drowsy Dramamine. I have been reading about Reliefbands. Has anyone tried them?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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I have sailed for the last 20 years and never had a problem until I was put on a new medicine about a year ago. I now have problems in the car and sometimes for no reason I can understand. Our last 15 day cruise was horrible for me. I usually use non drowsy Dramamine. I have been reading about Reliefbands. Has anyone tried them?

 

 

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My wife swears by the bands.

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My wife swears by the bands.

 

 

 

Does she use the regular pressure bands sold for about $10 or the electronic charge “Reliefbands “ that sell for $100 for 1.0 or $200 for the new 2.0?

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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I have had bouts of motion sickness far more often on land than on ships, but I always bring something on cruises in case I get motion sick. I've used the patches, Dramamine, etc. with varying success. On our last cruise in June, I had some motion sickness and I used Motionease for the first time. It relieved the motion sickness almost immediately! It is topical, not ingested, so there are no side effects and it can be repeated as needed. A drop is applied to the finger and then placed behind an ear. It also has a pleasant smell. I first heard about it on this site and have carried it with me for a number of cruises but I had not used it until the last cruise. BTW-it is available at Wal-Mart and I also saw it in the ship store with aspirin and similar products.

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