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TommyD3

Equinox ship wide power blackout

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Girl power. I’m guessing you’re not married?

 

 

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The engineering officers can be women as well.

 

"The doctor was a woman?!"

 

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I don't think it was a tongue in cheek post, I see it as a misguided hero worship comment.

 

 

In fact, I KNOW for sure it was a tongue in cheek comment. I was standing next her her when she posted it on the thread. That poster is my wife. In fact, she just joined CC yesterday and it was her first post! She is a highly educated and intelligent woman, has been on many cruises, as in fact, quite aware Kate didn't make the repair herself. Thanks for making her first post one that she'll never forget.:*:o

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Sailing the Equinox next sailing. Happy to hear that my heroine, Captain Kate saved the day!

 

Unless she is a mechanical or elecrical engineer, I doubt if it was her who solved the problem. I’m sure she’ll get the credit though.

 

You are both right in a way, tongue in cheek or not. And I doubt it was an electrical engineer, but an electrician’s mate who actually ‘fixed it’. The Chief Engineer is the one responsible for power and engines Dept, and the Capt is responsible for all of it.

 

So when something goes wrong, the Capt will ultimately be held responsible, even if asleep in their SR. The Capt is responsible for proper training of the entire crew and oversight of their Dept Heads who is responsible for the training and oversight of their crew. ‘It’ all flows uphill at sea and the Capt is going to be blamed or credited for all actions. If blamed, they take it; if credited, they pass it on to their crew.

 

Rules of the Sea that somehow have got lost when ashore.

 

Nice post GrazieMommy.

 

Den

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Girl power. I’m guessing you’re not married?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

 

 

As the one who posted the quote about Capt. Kate, yes it was meant as a tongue in cheek quote. I’m certainly aware that the captain doesn’t repair electrical power. It was my intention to bring some levity to the situation.

 

 

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So based on the heroine worship displayed by some, captain Kate was responsible for fixing a power blackout on the only Celebrity ship that had one... for which she was responsible. ?? :p

 

 

 

Ship happens and all Celebrity Captains have a trained staff and crew that can deal with these issues.

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How in the heck did this turn into a cheapshotting thread? All the new poster said was recognizing Capt Kate. And now we are into throwing dumb stuff around. I was on the Reflection on a TA when it lost partial power and we limped across the Atlantic, missing neat ports to stay on schedule. It was a male Capt, and of course no one would make comments such as we are seeing here.

 

We’ve all seen more than a few reports of Celebrity ships being late into, or missing port calls due to ship issues. And we all know that this is the first time a Celebrity ship lost power for an hour????

 

Give it a break. This is the type of thing that drives people off these forums.

 

Den

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And I doubt it was an electrical engineer, but an electrician’s mate who actually ‘fixed it’.

Den

 

Actually, I can bet that it was a licensed Marine Electrical Engineer that fixed the problem. Many countries have two career paths for marine engineers, mechanical or electrical. The cruise ships usually carry 2-3 Assistant Electricians (who are mainly light bulb changers), 2-3 Electrical Engineers, an Electronic Engineer, an Automation Engineer, and a Chief Electrical Engineer. All but the Assistant Electricians are licensed Marine Engineers. Anything in the high voltage range (10,000 volts) like the generators, propulsion motors, thrusters and AC chillers are handled by the licensed Electrical Engineers.

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Actually, I can bet that it was a licensed Marine Electrical Engineer that fixed the problem. Many countries have two career paths for marine engineers, mechanical or electrical. The cruise ships usually carry 2-3 Assistant Electricians (who are mainly light bulb changers), 2-3 Electrical Engineers, an Electronic Engineer, an Automation Engineer, and a Chief Electrical Engineer. All but the Assistant Electricians are licensed Marine Engineers. Anything in the high voltage range (10,000 volts) like the generators, propulsion motors, thrusters and AC chillers are handled by the licensed Electrical Engineers.

Great stuff! And Capt Kate, as any other Capt will recognize them for their work. And Capt Kate, as any other Capt, will insure a detailed report is made on the circumstances, a repair or safety report. And Capt Kate, as any other Capt, will continue to do their job, as do all the crew. Was aboard with her on Summit for 2 cruises. Excellent officer from all accounts.

 

Den

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Markf. I for one was not criticizing anyone. I said I was on my balcony letting the crew do their job and no one else seem to panic but they just provided information.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

Thank you and the others for posting. It's nice to know Celebrity handled the situation well. I'm now thinking about what would I do if the power goes out during a cruise.

To the person who worried about the pool filter - first thing that I thought about was ice for my drinks :)

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How in the heck did this turn into a cheapshotting thread? All the new poster said was recognizing Capt Kate. And now we are into throwing dumb stuff around. I was on the Reflection on a TA when it lost partial power and we limped across the Atlantic, missing neat ports to stay on schedule. It was a male Capt, and of course no one would make comments such as we are seeing here.

 

We’ve all seen more than a few reports of Celebrity ships being late into, or missing port calls due to ship issues. And we all know that this is the first time a Celebrity ship lost power for an hour????

 

Give it a break. This is the type of thing that drives people off these forums.

 

Den

 

Very well said - thank you!

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Glad they got the power on quickly, no one was hurt or stuck in an elev for hrs...etc..... Nothing wrong with girl power in my book!

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This sounds alot worse than the cold shower last week.

 

Sent from my Z981 using Tapatalk

 

We waited half an hour for hot (luke warm) shower.

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Great stuff! And Capt Kate, as any other Capt will recognize them for their work. And Capt Kate, as any other Capt, will insure a detailed report is made on the circumstances, a repair or safety report. And Capt Kate, as any other Capt, will continue to do their job, as do all the crew. Was aboard with her on Summit for 2 cruises. Excellent officer from all accounts.

 

Den

 

Darn, you only needed one more 'Capt Kate' to make this epic.

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Actually, I can bet that it was a licensed Marine Electrical Engineer that fixed the problem. Many countries have two career paths for marine engineers, mechanical or electrical. The cruise ships usually carry 2-3 Assistant Electricians (who are mainly light bulb changers), 2-3 Electrical Engineers, an Electronic Engineer, an Automation Engineer, and a Chief Electrical Engineer. All but the Assistant Electricians are licensed Marine Engineers. Anything in the high voltage range (10,000 volts) like the generators, propulsion motors, thrusters and AC chillers are handled by the licensed Electrical Engineers.

 

 

Thanks Chief: I am even more impressed that nine people take care of all things electrical on a small floating city. I imagine they have very little time to relax. It shows you how hard all ships personnel work to make our vacations enjoyable.

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Thanks Chief: I am even more impressed that nine people take care of all things electrical on a small floating city. I imagine they have very little time to relax. It shows you how hard all ships personnel work to make our vacations enjoyable.

 

We all work a 12 hour shift in engineering. The Assistant Electricians take care of lighting and issues with power in the pax cabins, and the Electrical Engineers are divided into one for the engine room equipment, one for galley and laundry equipment, and one just for elevators. The Electronic guy does the comms equipment, TV system, fire alarm systems, etc. The Automation guy takes care of the engine room automation, and shares the bridge electronics with the Electronic Engineer. One Assistant Electrician will be "on call" each night to respond to calls for assistance during off-duty hours (1800 - 0600).

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Darn, you only needed one more 'Capt Kate' to make this epic.

Or one more whining post about ‘Capt Kate’ to make it Homeric, or a Gross of grossers.

 

Den

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Someone clearly blew a circuit breaker with their rice cooker.

 

OMG too funny!

 

Made my night!

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Actually, I can bet that it was a licensed Marine Electrical Engineer that fixed the problem. Many countries have two career paths for marine engineers, mechanical or electrical. The cruise ships usually carry 2-3 Assistant Electricians (who are mainly light bulb changers), 2-3 Electrical Engineers, an Electronic Engineer, an Automation Engineer, and a Chief Electrical Engineer. All but the Assistant Electricians are licensed Marine Engineers. Anything in the high voltage range (10,000 volts) like the generators, propulsion motors, thrusters and AC chillers are handled by the licensed Electrical Engineers.

 

I love your posts. Where ever I happen to read them, they never disappoint.

 

You should be drawing a salary from CC.

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Would it be out of place to ask here what in hindsight should have been done differently on the Triumph?

 

Most of Carnival's ships are derivatives of the Destiny Class (similar design, but bigger), all the way to the Splendor. They all shared one major defect in their attempt to segregate the two engine rooms. This is why both the Triumph, built in 1999, and the Splendor, built in 2008, both had almost identical total loss of power due to engine room fires. While all the ships had two engine rooms, with generators in each engine room, they had only one switchboard room (where the power cables from the generators come together for connection to the "grid", if you will, and where the distribution of that power was done via banks of circuit breakers into the various circuits. This switchboard room was also the Engine Control Room, where the engineers controlled the operation of the power generating plant. This design led to running the power cables from the forward engine room through the aft engine room to get to the switchboard room. When the engine in the aft engine room caught fire, it burned the cabling from the forward engine room as well as the cabling from the aft engine room, rendering both engine rooms unusable. Also, as the cabling burned, it carried smoke up through the cabling into the switchboard room, rendering the included Engine Control Room untenable, and so control was lost.

 

Carnival has rectified this by re-routing the cabling from the forward engine room outside the aft engine room to the switchboard room, so that another fire in the aft engine room should not affect the forward engine room generators.

 

A better design that I have seen on cruise ships is to have a separate switchboard room for each engine room, with a connection between the switchboards using circuit breakers, to allow power to all services (hotel, propulsion, engineering) to be fed from either switchboard, so that loss of one engine room, or one switchboard does not completely take out power to the ship. This also usually includes separating the ECR from the switchboard rooms so that the chance of smoke entry into the ECR is lessened.

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or one more whining post about ‘capt kate’ to make it homeric, or a gross of grossers.

 

Den

 

 

or a gross of grossers.

;)

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How in the heck did this turn into a cheapshotting thread?

 

Den

"For every action there is an equal and opposite re-action."

 

I like all the captains in the fleet and I am always amazed at how little mention the other captains get because they are neither American nor female.

 

 

It is Celebrity training that resolved the issue and as soon as anyone mentions who the credit should go to I get the urge to post because only one seems to have a fan club.

 

 

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"For every action there is an equal and opposite re-action."

 

I like all the captains in the fleet and I am always amazed at how little mention the other captains get because they are neither American nor female.

 

 

It is Celebrity training that resolved the issue and as soon as anyone mentions who the credit should go to I get the urge to post because only one seems to have a fan club.

 

If you read carefully, there are various preferred captains. Being American helps because they are more open. If you see past comments, you see that some captains are "invisibles" (not often seen in public spaces, not greeting people) and "mutes" (few official "daily" announcements). As you see, not all captain are made equal. As passengers we prefer visible and instructive captain (which maybe are not the more competent and safe, OTOH I think all in Celebrity are more than "good enough").

 

Being female often help (once one reach a certain level): we recognize them more.

 

But the real reason: she has an English name. We have the captain "Greek/non-Greek", but it is difficult to remember the name and write it (and having a brother captain do not help, one cannot just use the surname). But we like him.

 

All captains are different each other.

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Most of Carnival's ships are derivatives of the Destiny Class (similar design, but bigger), all the way to the Splendor. They all shared one major defect in their attempt to segregate the two engine rooms. This is why both the Triumph, built in 1999, and the Splendor, built in 2008, both had almost identical total loss of power due to engine room fires. While all the ships had two engine rooms, with generators in each engine room, they had only one switchboard room (where the power cables from the generators come together for connection to the "grid", if you will, and where the distribution of that power was done via banks of circuit breakers into the various circuits. This switchboard room was also the Engine Control Room, where the engineers controlled the operation of the power generating plant. This design led to running the power cables from the forward engine room through the aft engine room to get to the switchboard room. When the engine in the aft engine room caught fire, it burned the cabling from the forward engine room as well as the cabling from the aft engine room, rendering both engine rooms unusable. Also, as the cabling burned, it carried smoke up through the cabling into the switchboard room, rendering the included Engine Control Room untenable, and so control was lost.

 

 

 

Carnival has rectified this by re-routing the cabling from the forward engine room outside the aft engine room to the switchboard room, so that another fire in the aft engine room should not affect the forward engine room generators.

 

 

 

A better design that I have seen on cruise ships is to have a separate switchboard room for each engine room, with a connection between the switchboards using circuit breakers, to allow power to all services (hotel, propulsion, engineering) to be fed from either switchboard, so that loss of one engine room, or one switchboard does not completely take out power to the ship. This also usually includes separating the ECR from the switchboard rooms so that the chance of smoke entry into the ECR is lessened.

 

 

 

I have a somewhat unrelated question. We sail on the Celebrity Equinox on September 14 with the Southern Caribbean itinerary. As of today there’s a tropical depression with 90% chance of development forecasted to possibly head in that area. Does anyone know if celebrity will just change the itinerary or cancel the cruise? Perhaps I should call CCL.

 

 

 

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