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Summerprincess

Antarctica Cruise Suggestions

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Hello All,

 

We are trying to decide which side of the ship to reserve a state room on for a cruise to Antarctica (Buenos Aires to Santiago.) If anyone has any suggestions on which side of the ship and which deck is best on this particular cruise, I would greatly appreciate it. I am asking because this summer we did the Land of the Midnight Sun cruise in Norway and I wish we had reserved our balcony on the starboard rather than port side. Now we will know for next time. clear.png?emoji-smile-1742 Any other suggestions for this trip would also be very welcome.

Thank you!

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For the South America part, book the land side which would be starboard. You'll be on the correct side for sailing round the horn and for glacier alley. Can't speak to which side will be better for scenic sailing Antarctica though since we'll be doing that part in 2020.

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Hey SummerPrincess - I have one of these cruises held. Hopefully I will be able to do it. Send me an email (link in signature) when you have time. I have a picture for you!

 

Theresa

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Interesting to find out more info.

 

I do believe small expedition cruise lines will allow you to actually set foot on Antartica.

 

By treaty, only ships with 600 or fewer passengers can have shore excursions,

and then only 100 on the continent at any one time. There are also regulations

on the fuel burned aboard.

 

On any Princess ship, that would be a *lot* of empty cabins. :')

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I sailed the on the Zaandam from San Antonio (it won't be from Santiago) to Buenos Aires during her New Year's Antarctic cruise this year. On which side of the ship your stateroom is matters not. When you are sailing in scenic waters, you will want to be "out and about" to view the scenery from as many angles as possible. To remain in a stateroom, even with a veranda, and view just what you are seeing is missing what could be viewed on the other side of the ship--or even ahead or behind.

 

If your ship provides commentary as to what you are seeing, you need to be in a venue where you can hear such. Such information, as well as any informative programs offered on board, enriches one's travel to that part of the world.

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Hey SummerPrincess - I have one of these cruises held. Hopefully I will be able to do it. Send me an email (link in signature) when you have time. I have a picture for you!

 

Theresa

 

Hi Theresa!

I just sent you an email. :)

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By treaty, only ships with 600 or fewer passengers can have shore excursions,

and then only 100 on the continent at any one time. There are also regulations

on the fuel burned aboard.

 

On any Princess ship, that would be a *lot* of empty cabins. :')

 

Although we normally sail on Princess, we are doing this 15-night RT from Ushaiua to Antarctica in December. 200 pax maximum, all inclusive, landings by zodiac.

 

https://www.silversea.com/destinations/antarctica-cruise/ushuaia-to-ushuaia-1829.html?fycref=row1

 

Anyone want to go with us?

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Although we normally sail on Princess, we are doing this 15-night RT from Ushaiua to Antarctica in December. 200 pax maximum, all inclusive, landings by zodiac.

 

https://www.silversea.com/destinations/antarctica-cruise/ushuaia-to-ushuaia-1829.html?fycref=row1

 

Anyone want to go with us?

 

Last time I had Antarctica plans, the cruise line sent a letter (yeah, a while back) saying, "You've reached

the top of the wait-list. Please send a $5,000 pp non-refundable deposit. We'll tell you in 3 months what

the fare will be." March of the Penguins was in the theatres.

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If you can swing it, please try to make this sailing on an expedition size ship with 200 or fewer passengers. Looking back, you will not regret the money spent. We sailed Antarctica (including Falklands and South Georgia Islands) on Ponant in January, and it was the most amazing journey. There is nothing quite like walking among thousands of penguins on a beach, seeing baby seal pups playing in pools of water at your feet, or sipping champagne on an iceberg.

On the smaller ships, you will zodiac to shore several times a day for "landings" and really experience the area, on a larger ship you will do a "drive by" from the ship.

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Although we normally sail on Princess, we are doing this 15-night RT from Ushaiua to Antarctica in December. 200 pax maximum, all inclusive, landings by zodiac.

 

https://www.silversea.com/destinations/antarctica-cruise/ushuaia-to-ushuaia-1829.html?fycref=row1

 

Anyone want to go with us?

 

Wow thought it would be expensive but that is a bit much over our comfort zone.

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Wow thought it would be expensive but that is a bit much over our comfort zone.

 

My main issue is that there are no guarantees of landings. So you pay the huge amount and you may not be able to land.

 

I had a friend who did a Princess cruise 10 years ago and enjoyed the viewing. I thought if I went, I would want the landings. 10 years later, I haven't done either and am booked on one of Princess's sailings for "sail by". I think it would be good enough for me.

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My main issue is that there are no guarantees of landings. So you pay the huge amount and you may not be able to land.

 

I had a friend who did a Princess cruise 10 years ago and enjoyed the viewing. I thought if I went, I would want the landings. 10 years later, I haven't done either and am booked on one of Princess's sailings for "sail by". I think it would be good enough for me.

I have never heard of an expedition ship not doing any landings. I imagine on a short, 10 day Antarctica only sailing it could happen. You are not guaranteed the exact itinerary, or all the landings, or basically anything on an Antarctic expedition sailing due to the climate and remoteness of where you are. But with 2 to 3 landings a day, you will certainly experience some.

We had a 17 day sailing, and had many opportunities for landings, hikes, and so on, to the point that DH skipped an afternoon landing once just to nap.

Another difference between a 200 passenger ship and a 2000 passenger ship is that you are getting right up next to the beauty, and ice hulled ships can sail through icey waters which is fun to watch.

If you do spring for the expedition type with landings, have it include Falklands and South Georgia Islands. Falklands and South Georgia Islands give you the most bang when it comes to wildlife viewings, with many types of penguins, seals, birds, etc. Antarctica is the land of snow and ice, so is beautiful in its own right with giant glaciers and ice, but is more amazing in its silent remoteness.

Also, going in the end of January will get you baby birds, seal pups, penguin chicks.

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My main issue is that there are no guarantees of landings. So you pay the huge amount and you may not be able to land.

 

I had a friend who did a Princess cruise 10 years ago and enjoyed the viewing. I thought if I went, I would want the landings. 10 years later, I haven't done either and am booked on one of Princess's sailings for "sail by". I think it would be good enough for me.

 

 

We are booked on the Coral Princess January 20/20. I never dreamed I would even be anywhere near Antarctica in my life. I agree if we had unlimited funds I am sure I would enjoy going on a landing cruise. We priced this for myself & DH it would be $40-$50,000 to do that cruise. We can visit a lot of places for those$$. I am really looking forward to "viewing" Antarctica.

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If anyone is interested in reading details of an expedition cruise, I posted a review of ours upon return here: https://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2600943

 

Also, with planning ahead, depending on what expedition line and number of days in the sailing, you can get the rate down to between $20,000-$30,000 per couple, with air. Not that this still isn't a large amount of money, I just wanted to post that it can be done for less than the $40-$50,000 number posted before. We did a full luxury cruise line, with balcony, 17 nights, all in with air and other expenses, door to door, including gear, for around $31,000 for the 2 of us.

You can sail Hurtigruten, a more moderate line, for a 10 night sailing, catching one of their included air promotions, and get the trip for $8000 per person, then add in gear, and some other incidentals.

I agree it's not for everybody, but for anyone reading this post who might be interested, it's worth having the information to compare.

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We are booked on the Coral Princess January 20/20. I never dreamed I would even be anywhere near Antarctica in my life. I agree if we had unlimited funds I am sure I would enjoy going on a landing cruise. We priced this for myself & DH it would be $40-$50,000 to do that cruise. We can visit a lot of places for those$$. I am really looking forward to "viewing" Antarctica.

 

I did this on HAL Zaandam and it was incredible. 21 day cruise from Santiago to Buenos Aires. Three expedition leaders who gave lots of commentary, talks in the theater, Q&A in a lounge, etc. Spent 3+ days in Antarctica. Total cost of cruise, taxes and gratuities for a single person in a cabin was under $4,000. Initially I wondered if I would have been disappointed not booking a smaller boat. But I was very pleased.

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As Coral mentioned I did this back in 2009 on the Star Princess and am again booked for 2020 (not sure if it will happen) I don't think either side of the ship matters much, there is a lot to see and you will be moving around for different views.

 

Highly recommended and book now is the Falkland Island penguin tour with Patrick Watts. Best tour I've done anywhere in 70+ cruises. He was sold out 18 months in advance on my cruise

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I did this on HAL Zaandam and it was incredible. 21 day cruise from Santiago to Buenos Aires. Three expedition leaders who gave lots of commentary, talks in the theater, Q&A in a lounge, etc. Spent 3+ days in Antarctica. Total cost of cruise, taxes and gratuities for a single person in a cabin was under $4,000. Initially I wondered if I would have been disappointed not booking a smaller boat. But I was very pleased.
I did this on the Amsterdam after first considering Princess. The HAL cruise was so much better. Smaller ship, better itinerary, and the ship stopped at Palmer Station, one of the three US stations in Antarctica (McMurdo and South Pole are the other two.) The staff and researchers from Palmer Station boarded the ship for the day, doing a Q&A and talking to passengers about everything from their research to where their food comes from to garbage disposal. Have absolutely no regret sailing on HAL for this itinerary rather than Princess.

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I did this on the Amsterdam after first considering Princess. The HAL cruise was so much better. Smaller ship, better itinerary, and the ship stopped at Palmer Station, one of the three US stations in Antarctica (McMurdo and South Pole are the other two.) The staff and researchers from Palmer Station boarded the ship for the day, doing a Q&A and talking to passengers about everything from their research to where their food comes from to garbage disposal. Have absolutely no regret sailing on HAL for this itinerary rather than Princess.

 

We had the same thing on our Zaandam cruise. It would be hard to beat.

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I agree go on an expedition ship if possible where you can actually walk on the 7th continent , walk among thousands of penguins or take a polar plunge. We opted for the fly the drake option because me and my husband both suffer from sea sickness. For the 8 day fly/cruise it was $10,000 each which was worth every penny! While we were in Chile we also went to Easter Island to see the famous statues because you can only get to Easter Island from Chile or Tahiti. If you are planning on going I say spend the extra money and land on the continent.

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We are booked on the Coral Princess January 20/20. I never dreamed I would even be anywhere near Antarctica in my life. I agree if we had unlimited funds I am sure I would enjoy going on a landing cruise. We priced this for myself & DH it would be $40-$50,000 to do that cruise. We can visit a lot of places for those$$. I am really looking forward to "viewing" Antarctica.

 

I am doing this for exactly the same reasons. (Jan 21st sailing) To not go because I can't afford a small ship is silly

I was told that for the scenic sailing the side does not matter

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I agree go on an expedition ship if possible where you can actually walk on the 7th continent , walk among thousands of penguins or take a polar plunge. We opted for the fly the drake option because me and my husband both suffer from sea sickness. For the 8 day fly/cruise it was $10,000 each which was worth every penny! While we were in Chile we also went to Easter Island to see the famous statues because you can only get to Easter Island from Chile or Tahiti. If you are planning on going I say spend the extra money and land on the continent.

 

Where did you land?!?

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The side of the ship does not matter.

 

However, I would suggest you consider booking a cruise sailing from west to east (Santiago to Buenos Aries). While the Chilean coast and Beagle Channel are spectacular, seeing them after Antarctica (which is surreal) is somewhat anticlimactic. This way, the scenery (and anticipation) will 'build' rather than hit an early crescendo and 'taper off'.

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Where did you land?!?

 

Here is a video of an earlier Silversea Voyage.

They offer 10-day, 15-day, 16 or 18 days.

 

Unlike Princess, if you book early you get a discount, the cost of a Veranda Suite (Mini Suite in Princess terms) increased from $18800 to $29000 pp, before they sold out. Airfare to Santiago is extra, but the charter flight from Santiago to Ushuaia is included along with a night in a Santiago Hotel.

 

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Haboob- Most places we landed were small islands. We flew from Punta Arenas, Chile to King George Island. During our cruise we stopped at many islands Paulet Island, Gourdin Island, Wilhelmina Bay,Deception Island, Livingston Island and our stop at Brown Bluff was on the Antarctic continent.

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