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Serenade of the “C’s” I Mean “I’s” – Ice Bergs, Iceland, Ice Caps and Ice Cream


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Halifax has 250 public works of art - many of them here at the historic Pier 21. This statue if entitled "The Immigrant" and represents someone leaving their country and coming to Canada. Over a million immigrants came to Canada through Pier 21 - including both sets of my grandparents - one from Scotland and one from Austria. One took the train to BC and one took the train to Alberta.

 

 

 

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This display is entitled "The Volunteers" and honors the contribution of Canadian women to the war effort in WWII. The figures are life size and one is an African-Nova Scotian lady serving food at a Serviceman's canteen, one in a young girl collecting scrap metal and one is an elderly lady knitting scarves for the Red Cross. The figures were meant to honor women of all ages and backgrounds.  In response to the question as to who the figures were, the response was, "she's you, she's me, she's your mother, she's your grandmother.  She's all of us." 

 

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This statue represents the son of another immigrant to Canada - Samuel Cunard. Samuel's father  left the United States during the American Revolution and settled in Halifax. If you have sailed on a Cunard ship you have benefited from one of the many businesses he started as a Halitonian. In a bit of irony, it is a competing cruise liner in the background.:classic_smile:

 

 

 

 

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On ‎3‎/‎27‎/‎2019 at 8:19 AM, SailorJack said:

Halifax has 250 public works of art - many of them here at the historic Pier 21. This statue if entitled "The Immigrant" and represents someone leaving their country and coming to Canada. Over a million immigrants came to Canada through Pier 21 - including both sets of my grandparents - one from Scotland and one from Austria. One took the train to BC and one took the train to Alberta.

 

 

 

DSC_5512.jpg

 

 

 

This display is entitled "The Volunteers" and honors the contribution of Canadian women to the war effort in WWII. The figures are life size and one is an African-Nova Scotian lady serving food at a Serviceman's canteen, one in a young girl collecting scrap metal and one is an elderly lady knitting scarves for the Red Cross. The figures were meant to honor women of all ages and backgrounds.  In response to the question as to who the figures were, the response was, "she's you, she's me, she's your mother, she's your grandmother.  She's all of us." 

 

DSC_5513_1.jpg

 

 

This statue represents the son of another immigrant to Canada - Samuel Cunard. Samuel's father  left the United States during the American Revolution and settled in Halifax. If you have sailed on a Cunard ship you have benefited from one of the many businesses he started as a Halitonian. In a bit of irony, it is a competing cruise liner in the background.:classic_smile:

 

 

 

 

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Wow...that had to be a little emotional for you - seeing where your family first landed in Canada!

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I think it is St. Paul's Church as it is located close to the old cemetery.

 

 

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The very historic Old Burying Ground - also known as St Paul's Church Cemetery. It was dedicated as a National Historic site in 1991.

 

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The Old Burying Ground was the first, and for a while, the only cemetery in Halifax. There are 12,000 graves in the cemetery  and among the notable people interred here is Major General Robert Ross who, as you history buffs readily recognized, is the British commander who led the Washington Raid of 1814 that attacked and burned down the White House. 

 

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Leaving the area around Pier 21 we were virtually down town.  The walk up to the Citadel - probably the biggest tourist attraction in Halifax - was an easy uphill walk and took us past a number of historic buildings.

 

The Halifax Court House - dating from the mid 1800's.

 

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Dalhousie University  - one of the oldest universities' in Canada - founded in 1818.

 

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The architecture of the buildings certainly illustrates the fact that Halifax has been around for a long time. This one incorporates some French design  - which is not unusual given the strong French culture in Canada.

 

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Next stop - the very famous Citadel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On ‎3‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 1:19 PM, DavyJoneses said:

 

 

Wow...that had to be a little emotional for you - seeing where your family first landed in Canada!

 

 

Surprisingly, it was - more so than I would have thought.  The history of the last three generations of my family started right here when they stepped ashore from the ships that brought them to Canada.

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Cannon on display outside the Citadel.

 

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The Citadel sits on top of the hill that winds up behind the welcoming sign.  It is the highest point in Halifax.

 

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I don't think the original garrison included women soldiers, but times have changed!

 

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The interior of Fort George - known more familiarly as The Citadel.  Intitially built in 1749, the current structures date from 1856. It is now a National Historic site.

 

 

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The barracks building has been converted to a museum featuring military artifacts of the day.

 

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Reconstruction continues to bring Fort George to its former glory.

 

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This was our docent for our guided tour of the Citadel.  All of the guides, guards, and actors are students.  It gives them a good insight into Canadian history.

 

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A series of photos where a student is demonstrating the firing of an old rifle.  It was an actual rifle used at the time by the troops garrisoning the fort.

 

Ready.

 

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Aim.

 

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Fire!:classic_smile:

 

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Our guided tour took us throughout the Citadel.  This was the powder magazine.

 

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Among the many armaments of the Citadel were mortars such as this 10 inch Smoothbore Muzzle Loading  Land Service Mortar.

 

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And the armaments building.

 

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On ‎4‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 8:21 AM, SailorJack said:

This was our docent for our guided tour of the Citadel.  All of the guides, guards, and actors are students.  It gives them a good insight into Canadian history.

 

DSC_5458.jpg

 

A series of photos where a student is demonstrating the firing of an old rifle.  It was an actual rifle used at the time by the troops garrisoning the fort.

 

Ready.

 

DSC_5459%202.jpg

 

Aim.

 

DSC_5460.jpg

 

Fire!:classic_smile:

 

DSC_5461.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Did this make you miss not signing up to be a soldier for a day and firing those rifles?:classic_biggrin:

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We were fortunate enough to be at the Citadel during the firing of the noon gun.  The cannon is fired at noon every day and it is quite a ceremony. The long poles that the crew is using is to move the cannon into firing position once it has been loaded.  They use powder but no shot.:classic_biggrin:

 

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BOOM! Although they do not use a full load of powder the explosion is loud enough to be heard throughout Halifax.

 

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The crew answers questions after the demonstration. A good looking group of students!

 

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Some final views of Halifax from the Citadel before we head to the Public Gardens - which we have been told were quite beautiful.

 

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Looking downtown.  Our ship is just behind those tall buildings.

 

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I fell in love with the city's architecture.  This old house was just outside the public gardens.

 

 

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On ‎4‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 1:17 PM, Baatman said:

 

 

Did this make you miss not signing up to be a soldier for a day and firing those rifles?:classic_biggrin:

 

I started to say something about that but Jill looked at me and said "Don't you go there!" So I just sighed and imagined it.:classic_biggrin:

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The Halifax Public Gardens. One of the "must see" sights in Halifax.

 

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The first thing we saw after entering the garden was this magnificent tree with a couple sharing a romantic moment.

 

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Lots of ponds throughout the garden.

 

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I guess humans aren't the only beings that enjoy a good cruise on a cruise ship!:classic_laugh:

 

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Although we are almost at the winter months, flowers are still blooming.

 

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Afternoon concerts are held in this pavilion.

 

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Who knew cactus could grow in Nova Scotia!

 

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The Francis Fitzgerald bridge - honoring a Royal Canadian Mounted Police inspector. The bridge spans a delightful little river that was host to a number of picnickers.

 

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Say it with flowers - honoring the Centennial of Dalhousie University.

 

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On ‎4‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 1:41 PM, DavyJoneses said:

Jack, what is happening to the photos?

 

 

Sorry about that. My allotment is filled up.  The only way I can upload more photos is to delete previous uploads.

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Different organizations can contribute to the floral arrangements inside the public gardens - here a Hospice organization has made a contribution.

 

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High growing cactus.

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Another peaceful fountain and rest area.

 

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On ‎4‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 8:21 AM, SailorJack said:

 

Sorry about that. My allotment is filled up.  The only way I can upload more photos is to delete previous uploads.

 

 

I see you are using photobucket.  If you haven't already, you can buy extra memory from them - which lets you post a lot more photos.

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19 hours ago, yukongold said:

 

 

I see you are using photobucket.  If you haven't already, you can buy extra memory from them - which lets you post a lot more photos.

 

 

Thanks for the suggestion.  I looked into it, but as I don't have that many more photos to upload it didn't make sense at this time  -cost wise. But I will keep it in mind for later.  Again, thanks for the idea.

 

Jack

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Last photos of the Public Gardens.  This really was a great place to visit.  Next time we are here we will bring a bottle of wine and some sandwiches and picnic under the shade of some of the huge trees here. A couple of days ago, CruiseCritic published an article that was entitled, "10 Ports Not Worth a Second Visit" - or something like that.  It listed Halifax as one of those ports.  Don't believe it! This was one of the highlights of our cruise and we can't wait to come back.  Wait till you see the Harbor Walk - it is magnificent!

 

 

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32 minutes ago, SailorJack said:

Last photos of the Public Gardens.  This really was a great place to visit.  Next time we are here we will bring a bottle of wine and some sandwiches and picnic under the shade of some of the huge trees here. A couple of days ago, CruiseCritic published an article that was entitled, "10 Ports Not Worth a Second Visit" - or something like that.  It listed Halifax as one of those ports.  Don't believe it! This was one of the highlights of our cruise and we can't wait to come back.  Wait till you see the Harbor Walk - it is magnificent!

 

I agree with you - I can't wait to go back to Halifax! Not only did I not have enough time to spend at the places we did go (gardens and the Citadel, mainly), but there were also places I wanted to see but didn't get to, like the Maritime Museum.

 

I have enjoyed your review and photos and now a crossing like this is on my bucket list!

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The Halifax harbor boardwalk - looks like the trip to anywhere starts right here!

 

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The map shows just how large the boardwalk was.

 

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This had to be one of the prettiest and most diverse boardwalks we have visited on a port stop.

 

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