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alishac

Concern about motion of the ship in forward cabins

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My DH and I are booked on the Edge in March, and are currently in a mid-ship cabin. I'm considering moving to a forward cabin (10114) in order to be closer to the spa and The Retreat area, but I'm concerned about feeling more motion of the ship in that location. I've stayed in a forward cabin on NCL Getaway and did not have a problem with feeling any movement, but I believe the Edge is a smaller ship and wonder if it could be more of an issue there. I realize it may depend on how the weather is, but can anyone offer advise based on their own experiences in forward cabins? It is an Eastern Caribbean itinerary. Thanks!

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I always figure the bow hits the waves first so movement would be felt the more forward you are, we always like the mid to aft cabin location.

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1 hour ago, alishac said:

My DH and I are booked on the Edge in March, and are currently in a mid-ship cabin. I'm considering moving to a forward cabin (10114) in order to be closer to the spa and The Retreat area, but I'm concerned about feeling more motion of the ship in that location. I've stayed in a forward cabin on NCL Getaway and did not have a problem with feeling any movement, but I believe the Edge is a smaller ship and wonder if it could be more of an issue there. I realize it may depend on how the weather is, but can anyone offer advise based on their own experiences in forward cabins? It is an Eastern Caribbean itinerary. Thanks!

You will always feel more motion at the front of the ship next to a midship cabin.

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We were in a Silhouette Veranda cabin deck 9 about 9 cabins from the bridge. Fist two days of the transatlantic I felt the roll more in our cabin than when we were in the restaurant in the aft. However, laying in bed at night and being rocked to sleep was the best. this was the North Atlantic, and we have never had anything like this in the Caribbean.

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6 hours ago, alishac said:

My DH and I are booked on the Edge in March, and are currently in a mid-ship cabin. I'm considering moving to a forward cabin (10114) in order to be closer to the spa and The Retreat area, but I'm concerned about feeling more motion of the ship in that location. I've stayed in a forward cabin on NCL Getaway and did not have a problem with feeling any movement, but I believe the Edge is a smaller ship and wonder if it could be more of an issue there. I realize it may depend on how the weather is, but can anyone offer advise based on their own experiences in forward cabins? It is an Eastern Caribbean itinerary. Thanks!

 

We (family of 4) have stayed in the forward-most cabin on Deck 8 of the S-class ships for 4 cruises (45 nights).  The location is awesome because we are so close to the gym, theater, and forward observation lounge.  As far as ship motion is concerned, it really has not been much of a problem for us.  YMMV!

Eclipse FV8107.jpg

Edited by mahdnc

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In theory, the ship will rotate around its center point. Think of a see-saw, the further out you go the more movement, the closer to the center, the less movement.

In rough seas we have moved about the ship, to try and find a more stable location, including sitting in the dead center, down low near guest services.

We didn’t feel any noticeable improvement although logic tells me there MUST have been less movement, it just wasn’t much different. One night we walked the entire length of the ship from front to aft and stopped several points to see if we noticed a change. Not so much.

 

We've stayed front, middle, and aft but they all can be smooth or not.

If you’re highly sensitive to movement the middle should be best, but I’m not sure there is a “magic” location for rocking and rolling.

I agree with the advice pick the cabin you prefer, and being near an elevator is ALWAYS convenient since you use them so much on a ship.

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1 hour ago, justcrusn said:

In theory, the ship will rotate around its center point. Think of a see-saw, the further out you go the more movement, the closer to the center, the less movement.

In rough seas we have moved about the ship, to try and find a more stable location, including sitting in the dead center, down low near guest services.

We didn’t feel any noticeable improvement although logic tells me there MUST have been less movement, it just wasn’t much different. One night we walked the entire length of the ship from front to aft and stopped several points to see if we noticed a change. Not so much.

 

We've stayed front, middle, and aft but they all can be smooth or not.

If you’re highly sensitive to movement the middle should be best, but I’m not sure there is a “magic” location for rocking and rolling.

I agree with the advice pick the cabin you prefer, and being near an elevator is ALWAYS convenient since you use them so much on a ship.

There is, it’s as you say dead centre. If anyone is prone to motion sickness you simply dont want to be on a high deck front or back. In poor weather you are going to have one very miserable experience.

We were cruising on QM2 a few years ago in rough weather heading back to New York. Now that’s a proper ocean liner and the difference between sitting in the forward observation lounge and lower down in the centre of the ship was huge.

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I am very susceptible to motion sickness and have now sailed on more than 50 cruises. It has been my experience that if there is motion to be felt the worst place on the ship to be is at the front, followed by the far aft, with higher floors rockier than lower floors

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On 12/16/2018 at 6:44 PM, OCruisers said:

The OP did not have a problem in a forward cabin on another cruise.  

That literally means nothing.  There may have been no motion on that sailing.  I have sailed on cruises where I did not need to take any motion sickness medication at all due to very calm seas.  On others, I have had to medicate daily.  Each sailing is different.  One sailing does not give anyone enough data to determine anything for certain.  If they had sailed several times forward with no issues, then it would be reasonable to assume it doesn't bother them.  But one sailing?  Not really.

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2 hours ago, phoenix_dream said:

That literally means nothing.  There may have been no motion on that sailing.  I have sailed on cruises where I did not need to take any motion sickness medication at all due to very calm seas.  On others, I have had to medicate daily.  Each sailing is different.  One sailing does not give anyone enough data to determine anything for certain.  If they had sailed several times forward with no issues, then it would be reasonable to assume it doesn't bother them.  But one sailing?  Not really.

Yes, this is why I asked. I've been on around 30 cruises, but all but the one that I mentioned I was in a mid-ship cabin because I am prone to motion sickness and was afraid to venture more forward. The one cruise in which we were in a forward cabin was pretty smooth, so it was hard to tell if it would have been uncomfortable in rough seas. Bonine does help when I start to get queasy, but I'd rather not take it if I don't have to.

 

Maybe it's not worth the risk... The extra walking to the front of the ship will help work off some of the excessive calories I'll be taking in. :classic_biggrin:

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I would have to agree that the forward cabins and far aft will feel more motion in sea conditions that have a lot of pitch (A vessel's motion, rotating about the beam/transverse axis, causing the fore and aft ends to rise and fall repetitively.).   When the ship is experiencing rolling (A vessel's motion rotating from side to side, about the fore-aft/longitudinal axis.) you will feel more motion either higher up or lower down.

 

 

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