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https://www.cruisecritic.com/news/news.cfm?ID=8760

 

Lisa Lutoff-Perlo discusses the Revolution....

 

 

Cabins to be Rebuilt and Redesigned 

Cabins on the Millennium-class ships will undergo a similar transformation, with the line taking all the cabins down to the steel -- including in the bathrooms -- and rebuilding with a fresh layout and the airier decor Hoppen is known for. 

Celebrity also will revitalize the cabins on the Solstice-class ships, but without taking them down to the steel first. All rooms on both ships will be fitted with RFID locks, the line's high-speed Xcelerate Wi-Fi, Bluetooth capability and Celebrity's eXhale bedding featuring cashmere mattresses.

Edited by C-Dragons

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3 hours ago, h20cruzer said:

Just out of curiosity could you tell me where on Facebook you found these pics?

thanks Norma

Hi Norma, On Facebook I searched "Millennium drydock".  I have tried searching all different names and this one had some pictures.  There is also a short video of them painting the ship.  I would love to see how they are refurbishing the cabins and put an end to all the guessing of modular vs. tear down.  I wish there was more information.

 

Debbie

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2 minutes ago, DamWamWeRCruising said:

Hi Norma, On Facebook I searched "Millennium drydock".  I have tried searching all different names and this one had some pictures.  There is also a short video of them painting the ship.  I would love to see how they are refurbishing the cabins and put an end to all the guessing of modular vs. tear down.  I wish there was more information.

 

Debbie

See the article above...

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3 minutes ago, C-Dragons said:

See the article above...

Thank you!  I asked the person on Facebook if he could send more pictures/updates.

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Since from the photo it appears that any new stateroom work will be from the inside I wonder what would be fastest?

 

1.  Dismantel each stateroom, wall by wall, ceiling by ceiling, floor by floor and each electrical wiring statem as well as all lavatory plumbing systems and off load this piece by piece through some breach cut into the hull. Then reinstalling each of the above one at a time involving skilled work crews doing each separate job, wiring, HVAC, plumbing and flooring in concert so a rather tight schedule could be met.

OR

2.  Creating a single acceess breach and removing each existing module one at a time from the inside by mearly working in both directions from the access point and off loading the complete older modules in order. Prepare the vast, now empty area, with new electrical, HVAC and plumbing connections. Slide in already finished pre-fab and totally complete, with all wiring, HVAC, flooring and plumbing, modules through the breach and moving them into position then making the utility connections.

 

I hope that doing a major rehab deoesn't mean that 20 year old lavatories and the flushing and drainage systems wouldn't be replaced along with the older wiring and individual HVAC systems.

 

Option #2 seems the most logical choice since the new modules would need only to have a few utility connections made and they would be complete just waiting to be slid into place. The modules even come complete with wall décor, closets, desks and even furniture already in place.

 

Of course this all depends on how much refurbishment is to be done.  Whether the old plumbing, flooring, wiring and HVAC in each stateroom will be replaced or just cosmetic changes to the ceilings, walls, floors and lavatories will be made...

 

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25 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

Since from the photo it appears that any new stateroom work will be from the inside I wonder what would be fastest?

 

1.  Dismantel each stateroom, wall by wall, ceiling by ceiling, floor by floor and each electrical wiring statem as well as all lavatory plumbing systems and off load this piece by piece through some breach cut into the hull. Then reinstalling each of the above one at a time involving skilled work crews doing each separate job, wiring, HVAC, plumbing and flooring in concert so a rather tight schedule could be met.

OR

2.  Creating a single acceess breach and removing each existing module one at a time from the inside by mearly working in both directions from the access point and off loading the complete older modules in order. Prepare the vast, now empty area, with new electrical, HVAC and plumbing connections. Slide in already finished pre-fab and totally complete, with all wiring, HVAC, flooring and plumbing, modules through the breach and moving them into position then making the utility connections.

 

I hope that doing a major rehab deoesn't mean that 20 year old lavatories and the flushing and drainage systems wouldn't be replaced along with the older wiring and individual HVAC systems.

 

Option #2 seems the most logical choice since the new modules would need only to have a few utility connections made and they would be complete just waiting to be slid into place. The modules even come complete with wall décor, closets, desks and even furniture already in place.

 

Of course this all depends on how much refurbishment is to be done.  Whether the old plumbing, flooring, wiring and HVAC in each stateroom will be replaced or just cosmetic changes to the ceilings, walls, floors and lavatories will be made...

 

Why do you keep thinking that the ship is like a sliding puzzle?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sliding_puzzle

Again the only way a complete stateroom module could be loaded onto a ship is if it's actually sliced in half. I think what people are confusing are the terms MODULAR Vs MODULE. The components for the stateroom refurbishments are prefabricated modular wall components that fit together. These wall panels are pre- measured, prefinished and snap together. As I posted in my previous response, my parent's basement was finished using a somewhat similar system. Not only where these wall panels attached to the concrete foundation walls, but that were also used to create individual rooms and bathrooms within the interior basement space. The advantages of this kind of system is speed and ease vs. Traditional stud & drywall methods. 

It would be pretty much physically impossible to slide pre-fabricated stateroom modules in & out of a small hole. Just not going to happen. 

 

Edited by kwokpot

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15 minutes ago, kwokpot said:

Why do you keep thinking that the ship is like a sliding puzzle?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sliding_puzzle

Again the only way a complete stateroom module could be loaded onto a ship is if it's actually sliced in half. I think what people are confusing are the terms MODULAR Vs MODULE. The components for the stateroom refurbishments are prefabricated modular wall components that fit together. These wall panels are pre- measured, prefinished and snap together. As I posted in my previous response, my parent's basement was finished using a somewhat similar system. Not only where these wall panels attached to the concrete foundation walls, but that were also used to create individual rooms and bathrooms within the interior basement space. The advantages of this kind of system is speed and ease vs. Traditional stud & drywall methods. 

It would be pretty much physically impossible to slide pre-fabricated stateroom modules in & out of a small hole. Just not going to happen. 

 

 The following photograph (1) shows how modern cruise ship cabins are inserted (totally complete in every way) into the hulls of a Royal Caribbean ship.

The second shows a completed cabin waiting to be loaded into the hull of a cruise ship.

 

When there are no cabins in place the interior as just a vast empty space and has ample room to maneuver modules into place, especially if interior cabins are to be changed out..

 

Once inserted and set in place the only connections to be made are incoming hot and cold water, drains for waste, one electrical connection and one connection to the HVAC.

 

I gave two options and depending on how extensive the refurb is planned BOTH are reasonable.

cabin.png

cabin2.jpg

Edited by boscobeans

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3 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

 The following photograph (1) shows how modern cruise ship cabins are inserted (totally complete in every way) into the hulls of a Royal Caribbean ship.

The second shows a completed cabin waiting to be loaded into the hull of a cruise ship.

 

When there are no cabins in place the interior as just a vast empty space and has ample room to maneuver modules into place, especially if interior cabins are to be changed out..

 

I gave two options and depending on how extensive the refurb is planned BOTH are reasonable.

cabin.png

cabin2.jpg

You notice that there are no balconies in the picture you posted? 

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16 minutes ago, kwokpot said:

You notice that there are no balconies in the picture you posted? 

 

You may also note that the access cut in the hull is larger and not rounded, indicating that the module being installed will probably not be left in that location but moved to one that has the correct shape like the others in the photo.

 

You will also notice that the support structures for the verandas are already in place to completed after the modules are positioned where they were designed to be connected. 

 

And YES,  todays advancements in computer engineering and construction do make the construction process like a tremendously complex sliding puzzle.

Edited by boscobeans

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I also think that the cabins being installed are modular.  I do think that everything was ripped out, but the new modular cabins will be installed from the inside.  The balconies may just be touched up.  This is just my thinking and feel it is the fasted way this could be done for so many cabins in a short amount of time.  There is a lot of information if you google "how modular cruise ship cabins are installed". There is a lot of information of how older cruise ships carry more weight and needs to be torn out before new areas of cabins can be installed.  It all has to do stability of the ship.  Much more technical than I know anything about. Below is a picture of a Carnival cabin being delivered for a refurbishment - onto the hull of the ship.

 

Carnival Cruise Line reveals focus on cabin increase

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4 hours ago, Cruise a holic said:

Just got of the edge last week.  Whilst the ship is beautiful and has many hits, also many misses.  The storage in cabins less than S class.  Mistake to remove over bed storage and extra drawers.  We were fortunate and moved from an infinite veranda, which is a truly a window cabin with a window that opens partway in good weather.   Missing comfortable balcony furniture and even in sky suites a table to enjoy breakfast on in your suite.  It is replaced by a useless huge rocking chair.  They should donate the chairs to a nursing home and put back a coffee table.  Shopping high end but great.  Food was very good in specialty and MDR rooms.  Luminae disappointing menus.  The suite deck was wonderful!  It had its own pool, hot tub comfortable seating and bar. You could also enjoy lunch on the suite deck.  Enjoyed most of the ship.  

 

Have done a detailed review which will be published soon

 

 

Thanks for posting your opinion about the IV, which appears to be very similar to Host Anne’s experience as she also moved to a suite. Were you able to upgrade to the suite whilst onboard?

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The following video shows how totally finished and furnished module are inserted through a large cut out in the hull of the Freedom of the Seas. It shows how easily an entire stateroom can be inserted and moved along the EMPTY interior of where the cabins are to ne set in place. 

 

If the staterooms to be replaced have been previously removed, as units, in the reverse fashion it shows the vast interior of the now empty ship has ample room for new modules to be inserted, positioned and connected without destroying any verandas.

 

PLEASE PBSERVE THE FOLLOWING VIDEO AT THE  15:40 MINUTE MARK.

 

 

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The following video shows how totally finished and furnished module are inserted through a large cut out in the hull of the Freedom of the Seas. It shows how easily an entire stateroom can be inserted and moved along the EMPTY interior of where the cabins are to ne set in place. 

 

If the staterooms to be replaced have been previously removed, as units, in the reverse fashion it shows the vast interior of the now empty ship has ample room for new modules to be inserted, positioned and connected without destroying any verandas.

 

PLEASE OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING VIDEO AT THE  15:40 MINUTE MARK.

 

 

Edited by boscobeans

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LLP   says   " rebuilding with a fresh layout and the airier decor Hoppen is known for. "

 

Airier,,,is that what it is?    Okay!

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1 minute ago, hcat said:

LLP   says   " rebuilding with a fresh layout and the airier decor Hoppen is known for. "

 

Airier,,,is that what it is?    Okay!

 

 

The glass is being removed from the balcony sliding doors and replaced with cushions, for that fresh, airy feel 😆.

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9 minutes ago, hcat said:

LLP   says   " rebuilding with a fresh layout and the airier decor Hoppen is known for. "

 

Airier,,,is that what it is?    Okay!

 

9 minutes ago, hcat said:

LLP   says   " rebuilding with a fresh layout and the airier decor Hoppen is known for. "

 

Airier,,,is that what it is?    Okay!

 

 

5 minutes ago, villauk said:

 

 

The glass is being removed from the balcony sliding doors and replaced with cushions, for that fresh, airy feel 😆.

 

Could be screens or beaded curtains in place of veranda doors. In very muted grey tones of course.

 

THAT would be very EDGEY indeed.

 

beads.jpg

Edited by boscobeans

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33 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

The following video shows how totally finished and furnished module are inserted through a large cut out in the hull of the Freedom of the Seas. It shows how easily an entire stateroom can be inserted and moved along the EMPTY interior of where the cabins are to ne set in place. 

 

If the staterooms to be replaced have been previously removed, as units, in the reverse fashion it shows the vast interior of the now empty ship has ample room for new modules to be inserted, positioned and connected without destroying any verandas.

 

PLEASE OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING VIDEO AT THE  15:40 MINUTE MARK.

 

 

Thank you for posting the video.  I feel this is the only way that so many cabins can be installed in such a short amount of time.  I had also view this video previously and found it very informative.  Why do I have so much time on my hands???  I'm currently stuck at home with a broken femoral neck (upper leg/hip).  Unfortunately a very long recovery.

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1 hour ago, villauk said:

 

 

Thanks for posting your opinion about the IV, which appears to be very similar to Host Anne’s experience as she also moved to a suite. Were you able to upgrade to the suite whilst onboard?

Yes- of course we paid more, but it was worth it IMO.  

Edited by Cruise a holic

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14 minutes ago, DamWamWeRCruising said:

.  Why do I have so much time on my hands???  I'm currently stuck at home with a broken femoral neck (upper leg/hip).  Unfortunately a very long recovery.

 

Take it SLOW and let it determine your activities, NOT your desires... 👍

Edited by boscobeans

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13 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

 

Take it SLOW and let it determine your activities, NOT your desires... 👍

So true, thank you for the kind words of encouragement.

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I'm with Host Anne where I read in early announcements that "M" class would be done with module replacement but "S" would be furniture and decor only.  But I can't find that now and don't see any evidence of that being done.  I guess we will have to wait and see.  I'd think they would be showing it in-progress if it was happening on Millennium.

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1 hour ago, boscobeans said:

 

 

 

 

Could be screens or beaded curtains in place of veranda doors. In very muted grey tones of course.

 

THAT would be very EDGEY indeed.

 

beads.jpg

 

I'm in favor of beaded veranda doors. It looks EDGEY, and we can worry about wind and AC flow later.

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58 minutes ago, Stateroom_Sailor said:

 

I'm in favor of beaded veranda doors. It looks EDGEY, and we can worry about wind and AC flow later.

Love it!!!!! Glad people have a good sense of humor. Celebrity seems to be closed lip on the renovations.

Norma

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On 1/24/2019 at 1:58 PM, WonderMan3 said:

 

On S-class ships there are essentially three lounge areas; Sky Lounge, Martini Bar and Ensemble Lounge. On Edge you also have three; Eden, the Martini Bar and The Club, which has lounges on two levels. I think many people missed The Club as it was kind of tucked away, but it's quite large. If more people went there as they do to the Ensemble Lounge on S-Class then I think the crowding might be lessened at the Martini Bar (which actually has more space than the S-class Martini Bar lounge area but has also gotten more popular). IMO they should've had The Club very close to the Martini Bar so they could've been extension spaces for each other.

 

 

Good point. I thought the Club was a venue for late night dancing and some events during the day. Whenever I looked in prior to dinner, it was deserted with no activity. I never knew it was a lounge to hang out in before dinner and listen to quiet easy listening music. Thanks for the heads up. 

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They are making good progress on installing the new Aqua cabins in the spa on the Millennium! 

 

Right is before, left is the latest picture of the ship (courtesy of The Weets on the other thread about the Revolution): 

2019-01-26_10.18.00.jpg

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