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Dress for Cunard


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7 hours ago, Underwatr said:

It would be an improvement if the clip-ons looked imperfect enough to pass for hand-tied. DW and I used to enjoy sorting the tie-ers from the clippers at the cocktail party.

'We're' no longer part of the self tie contingent.  Fumble fingers now means we are relegated to clip on perfection. 

It's a tie. It conforms. We conform, they conform [I could conjugate the verb in its entirety but it's too early]. I do hope 'we' wouldn't be judged as wanting as we're sorted into the  clip on bow tie brigade.  😁

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I must admit  it took me a lot longer to learn to tie a bow tie than to use a knife and fork.  

 

Back to "Pea Gate" . Victoria2, brought up the very correct notion of the right way to use a fork, in a pleasant light hearted way in her reaction to the association of the term Riff Raff with not being a high level Cunard club member.  I must take the responsibility for reacting to the suggestion the using a fork as a shovel is acceptable and creating "Pea Gate". 

 

People on this forum zealously argue against any minor infraction of their own version of the dress code. For the same people to advocate a lowering of table etiquette,  is unbelievable. 

 

I must categorically state that when eating in what is one of the most elegant restaurants on the seas , seeing people shovel their food would  be more offputting than seeing people in casual dress.  

 

In terms of  standards,  table manners trump dress code. 

 

 

 

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Re bowties:  Although I do prefer the look of self-tie, I absolutely understand how hard they are to do.  I tie DH's; I can't imagine having to do so on oneself, and one cannot necessarily assume that the cabin steward is capable.

The idea of imperfect clip-ons is brilliant!  There's a cottage industry for the seamstresses who have been making face masks.

As punishment for my insensitivity, you may tell me that my evening shoes should have heels at least six inches high, and needle-thin.

 

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1 hour ago, shipgeeks said:

Re bowties:  Although I do prefer the look of self-tie, I absolutely understand how hard they are to do.  I tie DH's; I can't imagine having to do so on oneself, and one cannot necessarily assume that the cabin steward is capable.

The idea of imperfect clip-ons is brilliant!  There's a cottage industry for the seamstresses who have been making face masks.

As punishment for my insensitivity, you may tell me that my evening shoes should have heels at least six inches high, and needle-thin.

 

On our 2019 crossing, there was a passenger organized 'how to tie a bow tie' event in one of the tender lounges. I think most folks who attended and practiced got the hang of it, at least for the duration of the cruise.

This would be an obvious class to Cunard to have every crossing - and the shops should have the ties available for sale onboard as well.

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I have asked our Maitre d‘ - Attila - if he would be so kind to tie me my bowtie the night before formal night and he did it perfectly - like everything that he does!

 

Edited by Yoshikitty
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I really don't understand all the fuss about bow ties.

 

If you can tie your shoe laces (just like my grandkids) then you can tie a bow tie.

 

The secret is to close your eyes when you tie. Works every time.

 

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33 minutes ago, BigMac1953 said:

I really don't understand all the fuss about bow ties.

 

If you can tie your shoe laces (just like my grandkids) then you can tie a bow tie.

 

The secret is to close your eyes when you tie. Works every time.

 

But only if your fingers work.

Cunard has many elderly passengers and counting the walking aids on some cruises, I would imagine they have more than just walking problems.
 

Many elderly and not so elderly have fine motor control problems and that’s where ready tied come in. It’s only when you know people who do have problems that you gain an insight into many things which have never figured in life before and ready tied bow ties come into that bracket.


With knowledge, comes insight and with insight, comes knowledge. I never judge and rarely pass comment as one never knows what hidden problems people have.

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14 hours ago, Windsurfboy said:

I must admit  it took me a lot longer to learn to tie a bow tie than to use a knife and fork.  

 

Back to "Pea Gate" . Victoria2, brought up the very correct notion of the right way to use a fork, in a pleasant light hearted way in her reaction to the association of the term Riff Raff with not being a high level Cunard club member.  I must take the responsibility for reacting to the suggestion the using a fork as a shovel is acceptable and creating "Pea Gate". 

 

People on this forum zealously argue against any minor infraction of their own version of the dress code. For the same people to advocate a lowering of table etiquette,  is unbelievable. 

 

I must categorically state that when eating in what is one of the most elegant restaurants on the seas , seeing people shovel their food would  be more offputting than seeing people in casual dress.  

 

In terms of  standards,  table manners trump dress code. 

 

 

 

Amen!

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At 76, I am no longer have the digital dexterity of youth. But Tying a bow tie, is the same as tying your shoes. If you have tied a tie or a bow tie for years, it comes back to you. You might have to try a couple of times to get it right, but it is not that difficult. 

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1 hour ago, Bigmike911 said:

At 76, I am no longer have the digital dexterity of youth. But Tying a bow tie, is the same as tying your shoes. If you have tied a tie or a bow tie for years, it comes back to you. You might have to try a couple of times to get it right, but it is not that difficult. 

 

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5 minutes ago, navybankerteacher said:

 

The problem with bow ties is that they are close to eye level - so any sloppy, lumpy, unbalanced knot is sure to be picked up--- while shoe laces are further away and at a depressed angle --- so you can more easily slip by with slipshod knottery.

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I have worn both clip on and self tie, although I always get the butler to do the tie and cufflinks on a formal night. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter whether a man is wearing a clip on or a self tie bow tie, what matters is he is dressed according to the code. 
 

I came across a self tie obsessed person onboard once. He was wearing this garish red bow tie which made him look rather clownish. He didn’t have a leg to stand on really. 
 

The best part was that he grumbled about having to go to early sitting and then said to me he supposed I’d be at the late sitting. I mentioned that I’d probably head to dinner around 7.30pm and it dawned on him that I wasn’t sailing in Britannia. I’m sure he must’ve thought I was unsuited to the Grills for wearing a clip on tie 😂

Edited by Austcruiser84
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Sadly it IS that difficult for quite a few.

Proud people don't advertise their problems. They certainly don't need help if they have a solution which will fit the occasion and in this case, pre tied tie is the answer. Alternative solutions go for many an everyday task. As far as dress codes are concerned, what is seemed as sloppy dress on a passenger to some might have  been a herculean achievement in some shape or form for that person.

 

It's not up to any of us to judge or to assume anything if only for the simple reason, we never know what's around the corner and it might be us next. 🙂

 

 

 

Edited by Victoria2
depersonalised the reply
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On 1/2/2021 at 10:36 PM, BigMac1953 said:

Strange that you never see people wandering around looking for help to tie their shoe laces.

 

Actually I've noticed my partner gradually has started to prefer slip ons.  When he was ill there was times he couldn't tie his own and he was mortified 

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11 minutes ago, BigMac1953 said:

Ergo, everyone with a clip on bow tie suffers from a debilitating disease, all 1,200 of them.

 

I have never looked at a tie to discern if it's self tied or not, but then I don't look for what some judge as sartorial slip ups and if passengers are making a good attempt to comply with the dress code of the moment, it shouldn't bother the Beau Brummell's onboard either.

 

 

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52 minutes ago, BigMac1953 said:

I don't understand your comment. I am only questioning the logic which is clearly flawed.

Your extrapolation was out of sync with the line my comments were taking. 

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9 minutes ago, majortom10 said:

Just proves that "snobbery" is still alive and kicking on Cunard and those that look down on others as if they are better.

 

I prefer to think it's a case of not seeing the whole picture rather than snobbery as I dislike that word.

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