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My roommate may not be able to go on our cruise in less then 30 days. She has insurance  and  this is a  medical issue that just came up 

what do I need to do?  We have a group going with us so I still want to go

Will I have to pay more?  Just not sure what to do 

 

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  • Just wondering if you guys dont say anything at all, it might just go down as a no-show. Thats if your roommate dont mind not collecting the insurance. If not, you'll probaly have to pay extra.

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You will have to pay the full cabin rate minus the port taxes and fuel charge.  We had to do this once with my daughter it was 60  days out though. 

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50 minutes ago, Dave the Wine Guy said:

My roommate may not be able to go on our cruise in less then 30 days. She has insurance  and  this is a  medical issue that just came up 

what do I need to do?  We have a group going with us so I still want to go

Will I have to pay more?  Just not sure what to do 

 

Do you have insurance? If so any increase on your part may be covered under your policy.

Edited by Bevv

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I am confused why a roommate cancelling would cause an increase of the fare of the other party.  Carnival will not refund the fare of the cancelling person so the room has been paid. If there is a fee- then being a no show is best and then has the roommate file her insurance to has her fare refunded. 

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24 minutes ago, Purvis1231 said:

I am confused why a roommate cancelling would cause an increase of the fare of the other party.  Carnival will not refund the fare of the cancelling person so the room has been paid. If there is a fee- then being a no show is best and then has the roommate file her insurance to has her fare refunded. 

 

  Based on the wording from Carnival Vacation Protection policy you can be charged a single supplement if your cabin mate cancels.  I have not been able to locate that specific information on the Carnival website yet.

 

Carnival Cancellation Fee Waiver refunds are also provided if you are charged a change in occupancy/ single supplement charge as a result of your traveling companion’s cancellation due to one of the reasons cited above.

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1 minute ago, Dave the Wine Guy said:

That’s what I was thinking.  Is her insurance pays for her part then why should I have to pay double 

I may be reading it wrong.. but to me it says that if Person 2 cannot make the trip because of a covered medical condition, Person 1 has to pay the single supplement.  If Person 1 has insurance like referred to above, then Person 1 gets the single supplement paid by Person 1's insurance.

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35 minutes ago, Bevv said:

I may be reading it wrong.. but to me it says that if Person 2 cannot make the trip because of a covered medical condition, Person 1 has to pay the single supplement.  If Person 1 has insurance like referred to above, then Person 1 gets the single supplement paid by Person 1's insurance.

Carnival is getting paid for two in that cabin by someone before sailing.

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11 hours ago, Purvis1231 said:

I am confused why a roommate cancelling would cause an increase of the fare of the other party.  Carnival will not refund the fare of the cancelling person so the room has been paid.

 

Carnival will be refunding 100% of the cancelling person's fare.

 

Travel Insurance pays out on cancellation penalties assessed by the cruise line.

 

If the 2nd party cancels, Carnival will issue a 100% refund of their cruise fare. Carnival will then assess a cancellation penalty equal to the amount of the cancellation (50% of the cabin total). An insurance claim is then made by the person cancelling (Passenger 2) for the amount of the penalty.

 

This leaves the lone passenger in a cabin that is only 1/2 paid for. So a Solo Supplement equal to 50% of the cabin total is assessed by the cruise line. Solo Passenger 1 will pay the supplement and can then file an insurance claim for this Supplement charge because it is being charged due to a penalty being assessed by Passenger 1's cancellation.

 

If there is a fee- then being a no show is best and then has the roommate file her insurance to has her fare refunded.

No it is not.

Travel insurance only pays a claim for a cancellation due to covered reasons (ie medical/death in the family/jury duty etc..) and made to the cruise line.

 

A no show is not a covered reason.

Hope this explains it.

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Who did she get the insurance from?? I think that makes a difference, also the policy she chose!

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Don't call anyone...just show up to the ship...you will be refunded port and tax charges. Your roommate can file for insurance after the cruise has completed. Anything other than this can result in penalty charges. 

As an aside, prior to sailing,  you could always change the name in the cabin to someone who can go. 

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I believe that in any scenario you would have to pay the single supplement, then claim it on your insurance.  Carnival expects those cabins to be occupied by 2 people.  They don't care why someone cannot go...they care about that cabin being filled at the correct occupancy rate.

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We went as a group of 11 one time with 5 rooms.  On the day of the cruise, 1 roommate missed her flight.  She called Carnival to say she wouldn't make it.  They did not charge her roommate any extra.  In fact, she was able to get back her fare with the exception of the non-refundable deposit.  I can't recall if that is because she had insurance or if it was the rate she paid.  But the roommate she went with definitely did not pay extra.

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10 minutes ago, Kermarkim said:

We went as a group of 11 one time with 5 rooms.  On the day of the cruise, 1 roommate missed her flight.  She called Carnival to say she wouldn't make it.  They did not charge her roommate any extra.  In fact, she was able to get back her fare with the exception of the non-refundable deposit.  I can't recall if that is because she had insurance or if it was the rate she paid.  But the roommate she went with definitely did not pay extra.

Carnival got their money before sailing which is why the remaining guest was not charging the supplement.

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2 hours ago, rolloman said:

Don't call anyone...just show up to the ship...you will be refunded port and tax charges. Your roommate can file for insurance after the cruise has completed. Anything other than this can result in penalty charges. 

As an aside, prior to sailing,  you could always change the name in the cabin to someone who can go. 

I didn’t know you could file for cancelation insurance if you don’t cancel before sailing date.

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23 hours ago, AdGuyMG said:

Hope this explains it.

No I am even more confused. In this case, the person is reporting it is less than 30 days before sailing so Carnival will not issue any fare refund so the room is fully paid for two persons. I once had to cancel a cruise for illness. When I called Carnival the lady told me cancelling and no show is the same thing. So we did not show and a few days later we got a letter telling us that our taxes would be refunded. We used that to file our insurance claim and our fare was refunded by the insurance company. 

 

On one of our cruises some friends had a break up shortly before boarding (while boarding actually). He came on the ship but his girl friend went back home. He was not charged anything extra. 

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2 hours ago, Purvis1231 said:

No I am even more confused. In this case, the person is reporting it is less than 30 days before sailing so Carnival will not issue any fare refund so the room is fully paid for two persons. I once had to cancel a cruise for illness. When I called Carnival the lady told me cancelling and no show is the same thing. So we did not show and a few days later we got a letter telling us that our taxes would be refunded. We used that to file our insurance claim and our fare was refunded by the insurance company. 

 

On one of our cruises some friends had a break up shortly before boarding (while boarding actually). He came on the ship but his girl friend went back home. He was not charged anything extra. 

He wasn't charged extra because he already paid for himself and the non sailing ex.  

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This thread is very confusing, because we don't know all the info, and the past situations that folks have experienced may not match this situation.

 

OP, it depends on what type of insurance your cabin mate had.  Usually you are required to inform the insurance company immediately to get the claim validated.

 

She really needs to read the terms and conditions of the insurance carefully to determine her next step(s).

 

If she is simply a no-show, that makes it easiest for you - Carnival simply refunds her the port fees/taxes, and charges you nothing further.  But that doesn't mean her insurance will cover her costs.

 

If she cancels now, I have heard it is possibly/likely that Carnival may try to get you to pay a single-supplement, despite there already being a fully paid fare.  I don't understand the rationale, but that is what I have heard.

 

Read your docs, and tread carefully!

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4 hours ago, ProgRockCruiser said:

If she cancels now, I have heard it is possibly/likely that Carnival may try to get you to pay a single-supplement, despite there already being a fully paid fare.  I don't understand the rationale, but that is what I have heard.

 

I tried explaining this in post 11.

 

The rational is that despite a fully paid cruise fare, if the 2nd passenger cancels out, Carnival issues a full 100% refund for the 2nd passenger fare on their books and assesses a PENALTY equal to the amount of the 2nd passengers cruise fare that they refunded.

 

Forgetting about the taxes ... say for example each passenger paid a base cruise fare of $699 per person for a cabin total of $1398.

 

A call is made to Carnival to say Passenger 2 is not going. Carnival will not say "sorry no refunds" ...... They will say "This $1398 booking is in 100% penalty. Therefore if the 2nd passenger drops out, the booking will be assessed a penalty of $699. In order to keep the booking active, the remaining passenger must pay the $699 penalty."

 

This $699 penalty is being referred to in your post as the single supplement.

 

So now lets say Passenger 1 still wants to sail.

 

What happens next is, Passenger 1 gets an updated confirmation invoice along with a Penalty Statement from Carnival showing a $699 Penalty was assessed and paid for on their booking.

 

Passenger 2 (the one who dropped out) gets a Penalty Statement From Carnival showing $699 was charged and uses that, along with the original confirmation to submit to their insurance company for a re-reimbursement for the penalty.

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@AdGuyMG: yeah, I understood that part, where Carnival charges the fare for Passenger 2 as a "penalty" or single supplement charge.

 

What I meant was, I have seen reports on this forum where not only did Carnival not refund anything when a traveler cancelled, but also charged an additional single supplement on top of that, meaning that Carnival got more than just two fares for the cabin!  So in your example, Passenger 2 does not get any kind of refund, and on top of that Passenger 1 get charged an additional $699, and Carnival gets $2097!

 

I am not sure if those reports were true/accurate, but I have read them.  Since I have never been in that situation, I cannot relate my own experience.

 

:shrug:

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I'm like the OP, this is so confusing.  I personally know of a case that went like this:

 

About a week before the cruise one of the people in the cabin was hospitalized and wasn't sure if he would be discharged and cleared to go on the cruise.  He had travel insurance.  In the end, he wasn't cleared by his doctor to go on the cruise. The other person (his girlfriend) went on the cruise and didn't go into detail about why her boyfriend wasn't there - pretty much made it sound like a no-show.  She wasn't charged anything extra.  The boyfriend was refunded by the insurance company. 

 

So, I thought that it worked this way:  CCL received full fare from both passengers - the insurance company is the only one out any $$ - so why would CCL be owed anything?  Now, I understand that the insurance he/she had may have some restriction, but I still don't get why CCL should be paid twice.

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7 hours ago, ProgRockCruiser said:

@AdGuyMG: yeah, I understood that part, where Carnival charges the fare for Passenger 2 as a "penalty" or single supplement charge.

 

What I meant was, I have seen reports on this forum where not only did Carnival not refund anything when a traveler cancelled, but also charged an additional single supplement on top of that, meaning that Carnival got more than just two fares for the cabin!  So in your example, Passenger 2 does not get any kind of refund, and on top of that Passenger 1 get charged an additional $699, and Carnival gets $2097! 

 

I am not sure if those reports were true/accurate, but I have read them.  Since I have never been in that situation, I cannot relate my own experience.

 

:shrug:

That's correct. When a booking is cancelled in 100% penalty Carnival gets $699 + $699..... + $699 from the 100% penalty. A total $2097 revenue for the cabin.

 

Keep in mind that if Passenger 1 remains a Solo, the empty bed creates $0 shipboard spending revenue. (Hence the 200% Single Supplement when booking as a Solo from the get go)

 

The customers, provided they have the insurance, come out whole.

 

Passenger 2 (the one who cancelled) gets their $699 back thru their insurance claim for an illness cancellation. (A Covered Reason)

 

Passenger 1 (the one still sailing) gets their $699 penalty reimbursed back thru their insurance claim due to an unforeseen cancellation by their cabin mate. (A covered reason)

 

* Note: If Passenger 1 finds a replacement cabin mate for the cancelling Passenger, the cruise line will waive the Solo Supplement penalty for Passenger 1 but will not waive the penalty for the original cancelling Passenger 2.

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On 2/4/2019 at 9:22 PM, 2wheelin said:

I didn’t know you could file for cancelation insurance if you don’t cancel before sailing date.

That wouldn't make sense....what if you missed the sailing on the day because of unforeseen circumstances? You certainly would be filing after the cruise had already set sail right?

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