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Electrical adapter

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I am traveling on the Viking Sky in April. Can you tell me exactly which adapter I need to use my curling iron.  I have several that are similar.  One says Northern Europe, one says Southern Europe, another says “D” and another says USA to Europe.  Thank you.

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From what I read, Viking has both 110 & 240 V outlets in each cabin. Unless you are plugging in multiple devices, you should not require an adapter plug. 

 

If using an adapter from Europe to N/America you must also address the voltage difference. If your devices are not dual voltage 120/240 V, you will require a converter to reduce the voltage, plus a pin adapter.

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Coming from the US I did not require an adapter. On Viking’s website under FAQ MY Ship you will find the answer to your question with specific information about stateroom electrical.

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I need to amend my previous post. After further review of Viking’s FAQ section on stateroom electrical outlets, they do NOT allow the use of any small appliances that produce heat for safety reasons. That would include a curling iron. They do provide a hair dryer.

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The FAQ under "What is the electrical voltage in the Staterooms" states...

 

You will find both 110V and 220V electrical outlets in your stateroom. All outlets are European style (2 pin) with a ground, except for two US 110V sockets above the desk and one US 110V socket on each side of the bed; there are no UK 3 pin sockets. Should you need an adapter, they are available for sale in the onboard shop or can be found at most electronics or travel stores. (Remember that if you’re staying in a hotel for part of your journey, you’ll want the appropriate adapter for that country as well.) In your stateroom, you will also find a USB socket to charge cell phones and tablets; just bring the appropriate cable with you. Most modern electronic devices can accommodate different electrical currents, so you probably won’t need a current converter; exceptions to this are curling irons and other appliances that produce heat; hair dryers are provided on board.

 

Is there another section of the FAQ which says curling irons aren't allowed?

 

OP...I don't recall whether I was able to use either the curling or the flat irons that I walked with in the bathroom...but I certainly used them at both the desk and at the bedside tables.

 

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I actually recommend taking one!  On Orion in the Living Room we kept trying to charge our tablets and phones while reading. There are plenty of outlets, but most of them did not work!!!  Finally I was chatting with a couple who had been on Orion for a very long time...thinking they must have taken about every cruise it offered since March (!) and they said the trick was having an adaptor.  Plug in with an adaptor and they charged just fine. They had experimented and found that they needed to use an adaptor to get reliable charges.  Next time...we're taking an adaptor. 

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49 minutes ago, Sunflower & The Scientist said:

I actually recommend taking one!  On Orion in the Living Room we kept trying to charge our tablets and phones while reading. There are plenty of outlets, but most of them did not work!!!  Finally I was chatting with a couple who had been on Orion for a very long time...thinking they must have taken about every cruise it offered since March (!) and they said the trick was having an adaptor.  Plug in with an adaptor and they charged just fine. They had experimented and found that they needed to use an adaptor to get reliable charges.  Next time...we're taking an adaptor. 

 

To clear things up: 

Using the direct USB to charge your devices is and always will be slower than using the electrical power outlet. (Several of the USB outlets are located on the light stands and walls).    Viking provides both.  I did experience that using the USB was slower than using the electrical outlet, but sometimes more convenient.   Note that even Apple recommends this:  " Your iPhone will charge fastest from a power outlet, rather than via a USB port. Apple's official advice "for the quickest charge" is to "connect the device to a power outlet using the USB cable that came with the device and an Apple USB power adapter. "

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3 hours ago, just_dont said:

image.thumb.png.0a6508971d3c63a3f8fadfacb3b067c2.png

 

Thanks...It's interesting that the Viking Ocean FAQ doesn't state that the items are prohibited (they also aren't listed as examples above), but the Viking River FAQ explicitly states that they are prohibited in the electrical voltage section.

 

Modern electronic devices can accommodate different electrical currents, so you probably won’t need a current converter. Please note that heat-producing appliances, such as irons, steamers, curling irons and heaters, are potential safety hazards and therefore not permitted on board. 

 

Every other cruise line that I've sailed with has prohibited items like clothes irons and hot plates and heating pads and made exceptions for hair styling tools. 

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OP are you asking about an adapter or a converter. They are two different animals. 

 

An adapter simply adapts the plug to fit into the outlet. Just because you can plus your device in does not mean it is compatible with the current coming out of the outlet. If you plug a device that works on 110/120v into a 220v outlet your device will fry; you need a converter in this case. 

 

A converter actually changes the voltage on the device you are using. Modern day electronic devices that have have plug in AC charging cords already have the converter built into the device; that's what the block does. Other devices need a power converter. If you are only travelling on the ship, you don't need a converter because there are 110 and 220 outlets in the cabins. Just use the outlet that matches the plug on the device. 

 

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, trinicruisegyal said:

 

Thanks...It's interesting that the Viking Ocean FAQ doesn't state that the items are prohibited (they also aren't listed as examples above), but the Viking River FAQ explicitly states that they are prohibited in the electrical voltage section.

 

Modern electronic devices can accommodate different electrical currents, so you probably won’t need a current converter. Please note that heat-producing appliances, such as irons, steamers, curling irons and heaters, are potential safety hazards and therefore not permitted on board. 

 

Every other cruise line that I've sailed with has prohibited items like clothes irons and hot plates and heating pads and made exceptions for hair styling tools. 

 

 

Okay--if curling irons and straightening/flat irons are not allowed on Viking River cruises then I am out.

Same for Viking Ocean. Deal killer for me.

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 My DW has taken a curling iron on our three VO cruises. No issues on board. The cabn attendant never commented on it. 

Note, you can not use it in the bathrooms. Use it at the desk with the fold up mirror. Plug on wall behind desk, both European and American plugs. 

 

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Nearly every cruise line bans clothes irons, hotplates and the other "heat producing items" listed by Viking.

Some lines explicitly grant exceptions for curling irons or straighteners, but if the ship doesn't provide US outlets, they would have to be 220V (i.e. non-US), as converters typically can't handle the power required by these items.

Viking doesn't seem to state anything about these specific items (just hair driers), while they do in fact have some 110V outlets.

 

Best suggestion would be to inquire directly with Viking.  I know I have read someone here post that they needed a heating pad for their back, and upon asking Viking, they were granted an exception.

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I concur with Bruce’s post. We’ve been on 2 VO cruises and my wife didn’t have a problem bringing her curling iron. Also never had a problem on any of the 11 cruises we have done. The only time our luggage ended up in the “naughty luggage room” is years ago we packed a travel iron. 

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Thanks to everyone for their advice and comments. I really appreciate it. 

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I believe you are talking about the cruise only.  Please remember though, if you are taking any pre/post excursions, you will need an adapter for the hotel.

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While there may be dual voltage hair curling irons, I bet most aren't.  So unless the device specifically states 110-240v, NEVER, NEVER plug it into a European socket unless you actually have a converter (relatively large and bulky) not just an adapter.  Doing so will almost guarantee a fire since the heating element will be receiving twice the voltage it needs and will get very hot before it burns out  I expect that this is a large reason for the prohibition since many people would get this wrong.

 

As stated upthread, electronic devices will generally be dual voltage so just an adapter is needed and no fire hazard...you should still check!

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As stated be very careful making sure the device is dual voltage.  With that said I think you would do better not taking it and inquiring about one when there.  Irons, curling irons, hair dryers are high wattage devices and may overload the outlets.  If you want to know the adapter type hotels use, it is type C & F.  Again, though the adapter usually doesn’t handle high wattage devices.  If you are bringing the curling iron on the ship, check with them as there may be a specific outlet to use   Just a suggestion 

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In our modern device riddled world, "plug anxiety" can be a real deal.  Peregrina noted the difference between adapter and converter.  Yep, we plugged a hair dryer into an overseas hotel with just an adapter.. Melted the critter.   I still stress the first time the iPhone needs plugging in to an overseas outlet.  One thing we use, especially on excursions, is the removable battery from our Away carry ons.  This battery (about the size of the iPhone) can charge an iPhone or iPad 4/5 times and can charge two devices at once.  Saves "experimenting" with strange outlets.

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10 minutes ago, Jim Avery said:

In our modern device riddled world, "plug anxiety" can be a real deal.  Peregrina noted the difference between adapter and converter.  Yep, we plugged a hair dryer into an overseas hotel with just an adapter.. Melted the critter.   I still stress the first time the iPhone needs plugging in to an overseas outlet.  One thing we use, especially on excursions, is the removable battery from our Away carry ons.  This battery (about the size of the iPhone) can charge an iPhone or iPad 4/5 times and can charge two devices at once.  Saves "experimenting" with strange outlets.

 

Except that those charging devices can also be a hazard and some airlines may ban them. If you are carrying them read up on the airline website under prohibited items in baggage.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Peregrina651 said:

 

Except that those charging devices can also be a hazard and some airlines may ban them. If you are carrying them read up on the airline website under prohibited items in baggage.

 

 

Yes, you cannot put them in the hold.  I can carry them in the cabin.  Have never been told they are banned by any of the airlines (including British Airways) we normally use.   I was referring to using the batteries on excursions overseas giving us a number of charges without using local power sources. 

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Hopefully not taking this thread too far off topic.  I have Googled and Googled, but my lack of knowledge of the terminology still leaves me without an answer that I understand.  Are Iceland outlets the same as Europe (non-UK, e.g. Italy, Germany, etc...)?  Will be using for devices rated for 120-220 (laptops/phones).  Just need to know if I need another adapter.

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IATA rules for Li-ion Power Banks can be found in

https://www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/dgr/Documents/passenger-lithium-battery.pdf

 

But . . . each airline has its own rules in its Baggage section.  Power Banks' capacity must be marked on the power bank, otherwise it will be confiscated.  Beijing Airport is adept at this, and will relieve you of your batteries without compunction.  There is lots of information on this online.

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