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ImANewfie

Carnival Vacation Protection Unknown Info Amazing

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8 minutes ago, Aplmac said:

.

Yes, of course.

Third Party coverage is required for all vehicles.

It's the only insurance product I buy, as required by law

to maintain a vehicle on the roads.

This is not so in the US....financial responsibility is required....insurance companies provide this as a profit making service.  Subscribing to an insurance service is voluntary.

Well heeled folks can post a bond which also satisfies the 'financial responsibility' requirement.

Is this also the case in Barbados?

 

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1 minute ago, thinfool said:

This is not so in the US....financial responsibility is required....insurance companies provide this as a profit making service.  Subscribing to an insurance service is voluntary.

 

Well heeled folks can post a bond

which also satisfies the 'financial responsibility' requirement. ===> Wow!

Is this also the case in Barbados? ===> No.

 

.

Rich and poor alike need Third Party Insurance coverage

for whatever damage happens to the innocent bystander/property etc.

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15 minutes ago, Aplmac said:

.

Rich and poor alike need Third Party Insurance coverage

for whatever damage happens to the innocent bystander/property etc.

 

Thinfool is wrong. In the U.S., auto insurance is required by law. If you are caught without it by law enforcement, you can (and almost always will) be ticketed for it. With that said, being law doesn't mean everyone has it. In fact, one of the unfortunate aspects of paying for an auto insurance policy here is that a portion of the premium is to cover uninsured motorists. Ideally, if an uninsured motorist causes an accident, they should still have to pay for damages out of pocket. But more often than not, they can't afford it, so your own policy's "uninsured motorist" clause provides coverage.

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, thinfool said:

This is not so in the US....financial responsibility is required....insurance companies provide this as a profit making service.  Subscribing to an insurance service is voluntary.

Well heeled folks can post a bond which also satisfies the 'financial responsibility' requirement.

Is this also the case in Barbados?

 

This is incorrect--Mandatory Liability Insurance is required by the US in all states.  The financial responsibility insurance (SR-22) is required for individual with safety responsibility suspensions, unsatisfied judgment suspensions, revocations, mandatory insurance supervisions and individuals who receive 3 or more convictions for mandatory insurance violations.  If you are required to file SR-22 then you can post a $70,000 deposit with the State Treasurer, file a surety bond, or file a real estate bond approved by the court.  You have to go thru an insurance company to file SR-22, its attached to a car insurance policy.  You cannot even get your vehicle plates renewed without proof of insurance.

Edited by carib1

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7 minutes ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

Thinfool is wrong. In the U.S., auto insurance is required by law. If you are caught without it by law enforcement, you can (and almost always will) be ticketed for it. With that said, being law doesn't mean everyone has it. In fact, one of the unfortunate aspects of paying for an auto insurance policy here is that a portion of the premium is to cover uninsured motorists. Ideally, if an uninsured motorist causes an accident, they should still have to pay for damages out of pocket. But more often than not, they can't afford it, so your own policy's "uninsured motorist" clause provides coverage.

"uninsured motorist" coverage pays for your bodily injury if the other driver (vehicle) is either un/or underinsured.  You would have to have Un/Underinsured motorist coverage with property damage to pay for any damage to your vehicle.  In my state, you cannot have collision coverage with un/underinsured with property damage.

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5 hours ago, ImANewfie said:

So, i have never had carnival vacation protection.  I called just now as we may have to cancel one person for medical reasons.

Sure no problem, i can pay the $129 per person up to 14 days prior to departure.   Perfect.

 

So we got into working the numbers, the agent i spoke with was quite knowledgeable.

Amazing to me how it works tho, not for our benefit!

 

if you have the insurance and make a claim, for insurance purposes everyone is considered the last person.

 

Interesting

 

Even though the person who may need to cancel is in fact primary person in room, paid 869 plus taxes and fees...   he becomes the last person, in this case a room of four.

 

His refund is calculated on the 4th person rate.. not his rate!

 

so pay 869, and be refunded 139.00 which is what fourth person was.   

 

Considering the insurance cost 129,  we would get a 20 dollar refund, plus of course taxes and fees.

 

I find it amazing that even though you insure specific people, one two or all,   the insurance uses the last person rule, for calculations.

Never heard of this , and wonder if any of you have ever run into this type of thing

 

Insure 869 but be reimbursed based on 139??  strange

 

To help settle some of the debate, can we get some more information, please? Has the person who may have to cancel already paid for their share of the cabin in full? If so, did they and person #2 agree to split the full rate, while allowing persons #3 & 4 to pay the lower rate?

 

If he, in fact, has already paid $869 in full, then I can see why he'd be upset. He simply wants to be reimbursed what he paid. The problem comes because Carnival requires a full rate for that cabin based on 2 person occupancy. Let's say the rate for a cabin is $1,000. One person traveling alone still has to pay $1,000 while two people could split that same rate. Even though your primary cancels, Carnival still needs the initial full rate for that cabin.

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9 hours ago, sparks1093 said:

I don't envision having anyone else in my cabin other than DW but I would think most people would split the cost evenly among the group. I know that I wouldn't want to pay $1600 for me and DW and then the next two only pay $200 each, even if that is the way the cruise line bills it.

 

I'm guessing most 3rd and 4th passengers in a cabin are children who aren't paying their own way.

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1 hour ago, Earthworm Jim said:

 

I'm guessing most 3rd and 4th passengers in a cabin are children who aren't paying their own way.

 

I’ve definitely read about three adults sharing a room on this board.

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As others have said. The issue is that this is carnival insurance. Carnival expects to paid for passengers #1 and #2 no matter what. Cabins are priced for double occupancy with addition passengers being less. So if you were to cancel #2 and get the full insurance benefit, carnival would still expect to get the fare. If it was a single passenger they would charge a single supplement. Since there are multiple passengers besides the canceled one, they are shifting them around to make another passenger #2. As someone else pointed out. Otherwise you book passengers #1-4 and then always cancel #1 and #2 so 3 and 4 can sail at a significantly reduced rate

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11 hours ago, Earthworm Jim said:

 

I'm guessing most 3rd and 4th passengers in a cabin are children who aren't paying their own way.

That would be my guess too, and if one had to cancel then likely all would cancel. But I have heard of groups of adults traveling together and staying in the same cabin in order to save money (like for spring break).

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17 hours ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

To help settle some of the debate, can we get some more information, please? Has the person who may have to cancel already paid for their share of the cabin in full? If so, did they and person #2 agree to split the full rate, while allowing persons #3 & 4 to pay the lower rate?

 

If he, in fact, has already paid $869 in full, then I can see why he'd be upset. He simply wants to be reimbursed what he paid. The problem comes because Carnival requires a full rate for that cabin based on 2 person occupancy. Let's say the rate for a cabin is $1,000. One person traveling alone still has to pay $1,000 while two people could split that same rate. Even though your primary cancels, Carnival still needs the initial full rate for that cabin.

After reading all replies,  i in fact do see the logic.   and yes what a way to pull a scam.   Book 4 people  cancel oen and two, and u end up with two people having paid maybe 150 each.  Now i agree with the logic ... wow

however on a sidenote to that...   ( lets assume most wouldnt do teh scam thing)  like any insurance, you pay a premium,  there are many people on these ships who buy even carnivals isnurance who never ever use it, so wouldnt it balance out

 

in any event, it is what it is,  there are insurances who will cover his full fare.. nothing to do with room numbers, and obviousy thats the way to go.. thanks everyone

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This happened to me when I had to miss an Alaskan cruise on Princess due to a medical situation that came up a few days before departure. My adult daughter was booked as the third person in our mini-suite and had paid her own cruise fare. She and my husband still went on the cruise, along with other family members in other cabins. When it came time for the insurance to pay they only wanted to refund the third passenger rate for my cabin. I argued the point that I was listed on the reservation as a certain passenger that paid a certain fare and that I should be insured as such. They finally agreed with my reasoning and refunded my full fare. This was insurance purchased through the cruise line. It is definitely worth a try to deal with the insurance company in these situations.

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11 hours ago, iltutcruiser said:

Insurance companies are in business for 2 reasons, to collect premiums and to deny claims.

 

There is a difference between denying claims, and limiting what is covered. There's this common misconception that insurance is "I was inconvenienced, therefore I should get a big payday". If that was the case, no insurance company would be able to stay in business. They do large risk assessments and will eliminate coverage on things they aren't responsible for, scams and loopholes, pre-existing conditions, etc. 

 

This is one reason why I generally stay away from extra insurances. It is a fact that the average person loses out big time in insurance premiums throughout their life. There are many things you are better off just self-insuring. However, it doesn't mean it is completely a bad idea to protect yourself against catastrophe. Most of us couldn't afford 6-figure doctor bills, liability lawsuits, or even in this case, medical evacuation. Know what you need. Know what you are buying.

 

Not that I know the answer either way. Can anyone confirm 100% that 3rd party insurance would have gotten the outcome the OP wanted? 

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5 hours ago, ImANewfie said:

After reading all replies,  i in fact do see the logic.   and yes what a way to pull a scam.   Book 4 people  cancel oen and two, and u end up with two people having paid maybe 150 each.  Now i agree with the logic ... wow

however on a sidenote to that...   ( lets assume most wouldnt do teh scam thing)  like any insurance, you pay a premium,  there are many people on these ships who buy even carnivals isnurance who never ever use it, so wouldnt it balance out

 

in any event, it is what it is,  there are insurances who will cover his full fare.. nothing to do with room numbers, and obviousy thats the way to go.. thanks everyone

 

I get where you and your friend are coming from. If he already paid the $869 in full, then he should be reimbursed for it. I'd feel the same way. Let Carnival then go after the remaining passengers in that room and get the rate they require from them. But that's too much effort on their end, it won't happen that way.

 

You didn't say, but did those 4 people divide it up evenly, or did your friend who's cancelling actually pay his full fare? If so, then Carnival is still getting their full rate and persons #3 and 4 are still getting a very cheap cruise. He could talk to 3 & 4 about paying him to make up the difference he paid for.

 

1 hour ago, Joebucks said:

Not that I know the answer either way. Can anyone confirm 100% that 3rd party insurance would have gotten the outcome the OP wanted? 

 

Third-party policies don't calculate according to who paid the full rate and who paid the cheaper rate for being 3rd & 4th in a cabin like Carnival does. You enter the expense of your trip and number of people and the cost of your policy is determined accordingly. They then divide the total expense of the trip by the number of people and would reimburse each one equally. Or at least that's how I understand it. We've used Carnival's insurance in the past, but I've looked into third-party insurance and will probably be going with it for our next cruise.

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14 minutes ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

Third-party policies don't calculate according to who paid the full rate and who paid the cheaper rate for being 3rd & 4th in a cabin like Carnival does. You enter the expense of your trip and number of people and the cost of your policy is determined accordingly. They then divide the total expense of the trip by the number of people and would reimburse each one equally. Or at least that's how I understand it. We've used Carnival's insurance in the past, but I've looked into third-party insurance and will probably be going with it for our next cruise.

I just started a quote at www.insuremytrip.com and it asks for the total cost for the number of the people traveling and the costs of the trip are evenly divided by that number.

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26 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

I just started a quote at www.insuremytrip.com and it asks for the total cost for the number of the people traveling and the costs of the trip are evenly divided by that number.

 

I guess the way to do it would have each person buy their own policy...and insure it for the amount they paid.

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1 hour ago, sparks1093 said:

I just started a quote at www.insuremytrip.com and it asks for the total cost for the number of the people traveling and the costs of the trip are evenly divided by that number.

 

Right, isn't that what I said? LOL

 

The cost of the policy is determined by the total cost of the trip you enter. Then divided among the number of people equally.

 

1 hour ago, Saint Greg said:

 

I guess the way to do it would have each person buy their own policy...and insure it for the amount they paid.

 

That's what I was thinking in the case of OP's friend and similar situations. That way you're reimbursed what you put into it.

 

Here's a question. Let's say there's four people on a third-party policy, but only one of them needs to cancel. Can that one person still file a claim even if they aren't the one who purchased the policy and the other three don't need to file the claim? That's something we could run into on our next cruise. I'm planning on purchasing a third-party policy. If one of us has to cancel, we cancel the whole trip. But our son is going to take a friend. If that friend has to cancel and we can't replace him, we'll still go. Will we be able to file a claim for just the one person?

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1 hour ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

Right, isn't that what I said? LOL

 

The cost of the policy is determined by the total cost of the trip you enter. Then divided among the number of people equally.

 

 

That's what I was thinking in the case of OP's friend and similar situations. That way you're reimbursed what you put into it.

 

Here's a question. Let's say there's four people on a third-party policy, but only one of them needs to cancel. Can that one person still file a claim even if they aren't the one who purchased the policy and the other three don't need to file the claim? That's something we could run into on our next cruise. I'm planning on purchasing a third-party policy. If one of us has to cancel, we cancel the whole trip. But our son is going to take a friend. If that friend has to cancel and we can't replace him, we'll still go. Will we be able to file a claim for just the one person?

Yes, it is what you said and I was confirming it based on recent experience🙂 (since you also added "as I understand it"). I would expect if the friend is a named insured that a claim could be filed just for him, although I'm not sure who would actually do the filing.

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8 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

Yes, it is what you said and I was confirming it based on recent experience🙂 (since you also added "as I understand it"). I would expect if the friend is a named insured that a claim could be filed just for him, although I'm not sure who would actually do the filing.

 

Oh ok, gotcha. I thought maybe what I said wasn't very clear. Sometimes things don't come out as clear as they sound in my head. 😜

 

I've never actually gone through the whole purchase process on insuremytrip. Just got their quotes by entering the trip cost and number of people. I'll have to look into whether a single claim can be filed for a policy that covers multiple people. When they ask for the total cost of the trip, do they mean just the cruise or everything from the time you leave home until you get back? We always drive and have, on occasion, booked non-refundable hotel rates for a cheaper price. Do people who fly include their airfare in that initial entry?

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

Oh ok, gotcha. I thought maybe what I said wasn't very clear. Sometimes things don't come out as clear as they sound in my head. 😜

 

I've never actually gone through the whole purchase process on insuremytrip. Just got their quotes by entering the trip cost and number of people. I'll have to look into whether a single claim can be filed for a policy that covers multiple people. When they ask for the total cost of the trip, do they mean just the cruise or everything from the time you leave home until you get back? We always drive and have, on occasion, booked non-refundable hotel rates for a cheaper price. Do people who fly include their airfare in that initial entry?

You should include all expenses that are not refundable, so if you pre-paid a hotel that would be non-refundable if you cancelled. As I understand it people will either estimate the cost of their airfare and enter it in the total or they purchase the insurance with the costs they know about and add the airfare later once they know what it is. I'm sure the folks at insuremytrip would be able to answer your question before you buy the policy. ETA- I just re-did the quote that I did earlier and subtracted the amount we are paying for government taxes and fees, which are reimbursable if you cancel the cruise. The policy I was looking at dropped in price by $40, so how much you are insuring does impact the total cost.

Edited by sparks1093

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

You should include all expenses that are not refundable, so if you pre-paid a hotel that would be non-refundable if you cancelled. As I understand it people will either estimate the cost of their airfare and enter it in the total or they purchase the insurance with the costs they know about and add the airfare later once they know what it is. I'm sure the folks at insuremytrip would be able to answer your question before you buy the policy. ETA- I just re-did the quote that I did earlier and subtracted the amount we are paying for government taxes and fees, which are reimbursable if you cancel the cruise. The policy I was looking at dropped in price by $40, so how much you are insuring does impact the total cost.

 

Yep, I worked up a quote the other day, then decided to add $500 to the trip cost to see what would happen and the price of the policy increased. I forget by how much, but I think it was still cheaper than Carnival's. To me, one of the biggest advantages of third-party policies is their "cancel for any reason" coverage. Carnival gives you 75% back as a future cruise credit if you cancel for reasons they don't deem qualified. Whereas, other policies I've looked at give back 70% in cash for "cancel for any reason." I know you get back a little less than Carnival, but it's not tied up in a future cruise credit, which I'd rather not get stuck with. Cancel for any reason raises the price of those other policies, but I've still found good ones that are cheaper than Carnival. And one of our biggest worries is that the friend would have to cancel, so we need a policy that covers any reason. We had a family cancel on us last year several months after booking. It made a mess of things, so now we're leery about that.

Edited by Organized Chaos

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1 hour ago, Organized Chaos said:

 

Yep, I worked up a quote the other day, then decided to add $500 to the trip cost to see what would happen and the price of the policy increased. I forget by how much, but I think it was still cheaper than Carnival's. To me, one of the biggest advantages of third-party policies is their "cancel for any reason" coverage. Carnival gives you 75% back as a future cruise credit if you cancel for reasons they don't deem qualified. Whereas, other policies I've looked at give back 70% in cash for "cancel for any reason." I know you get back a little less than Carnival, but it's not tied up in a future cruise credit, which I'd rather not get stuck with. Cancel for any reason raises the price of those other policies, but I've still found good ones that are cheaper than Carnival. And one of our biggest worries is that the friend would have to cancel, so we need a policy that covers any reason. We had a family cancel on us last year several months after booking. It made a mess of things, so now we're leery about that.

That's understandable. Maybe you could have a separate policy for the friend with CFAR coverage and then one for the rest of you.

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I have been following this post and it has me thinking (not always a good thing!)

 

I assume, but could be wrong, that most, if not all, these trip insurance policies have benefits paid based on "actual loss incurred" as opposed to a "stated/set amount". If that is the case, the insurance company would require documentation to support the damages claimed. They would not just take your word that you were traveling first class and staying in the captain's suite and pay the claim based on your estimate of charges.

 

That being the case and going back to the original post, if one occupant of a four person cabin was forced to miss the cruise for a covered cause of loss, what would the Carnival documentation show as the forfeited amount for the cancellation? I suspect it would be the fourth occupant rate and not either the first occupant rate or 25% of the entire room rate.

 

I have also seen some language in these policies that provide a benefit to those whose rate increases when a cabin guest drops from the booking.

 

As with everything else, one needs to shop around for the policy that best suits you needs for both cost and benefits.

 

It also should be noted that even the Carnival policy is underwritten by an insurance company (Nationwide I believe).  

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This is simply a misunderstanding of how cabins are priced.  The price is by the cabin but broken down by passenger.  The cabin price is based on a minimum of two passengers and additional people can be added for a cheaper fare.  The model is very similar to the way a hotel books room, 2 are included and each additional person is so much per night extra.  The passengers in a cabin share the total fare no matter what the billed cost per person was.

 

So....if guest 1 and 2 are $500 each and guest 3 is $200 that means guest 3 increased the cabin rate by $200....each are responsible for $400.

 

 

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