Jump to content

Carnival's rules for leaving/rejoining ship in different port? (Hawaii)


Recommended Posts

What would happen if you "missed the boat" in a port - you then have to pay your own way to 
"catch up" to the boat in the next port... I am guessing there are then fines for that? I feel the only way you are going to get your answer is to contact Carnival Directly and find out. There are cruises which have overnight excursions which meet ships at the next port so i feel it is a legit thing to ask Carnival if it can be done.  - Then report back here and set us all straight 😃

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

Yes, as others have said, this would violate the PVSA, which is not a Carnival rule, but a federal law.  Even if you "happened" to miss the ship in Honolulu (which would automatically cost you $750 in fines), you would either not be allowed to rejoin in Hilo, or would be subject to a further $750 fine).  The cruise line is actually fined by the government, but the ticket contract you have with Carnival gives them the right to pass this fine on to you.

 

1 hour ago, Kadeeu said:

I would contact Carnival to make sure this is not allowed.  Those citing the PVSA might be confusing a temporary stay off the ship with permanently leaving the ship which the law requires for a violation from what I've read.  You are leaving and arriving from the same port on the same ship and same voyage.  You won't be taken off the ship's manifest.  Who knows if Carnival will even want to deal with the "paperwork", but I would check.    

Chengkp75 is never confused.  Chief is "The Guy". You can bank on his responses.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jasalth said:

The thing I think you are getting in most of these replies is the idea that you want to sail to Hawaii, get off mid-cruise, and then take another cruise back. 

 

I don't think that is what you want to do or at least it doesn't sound like it. According to Carnival I could do this in Europe if I wanted to, but I have to contact them just a few months before for real "permission" and then go through a bunch of steps on board. In the end it probably won't be worth it to us (still deciding) but because of your limited mobility I can understand your desire to and the want to maximize your time in Hawaii. 

 

The best thing to do honestly is call Carnival or your TA and ask for sure. It might be different since it is a US port, but they can't force you to get back on the ship. It might result in fines if not done properly though like was mentioned with the PSVA fine. 

The PVSA does not apply to cruises out of European ports.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Auralee said:

What would happen if you "missed the boat" in a port - you then have to pay your own way to 
"catch up" to the boat in the next port... I am guessing there are then fines for that? I feel the only way you are going to get your answer is to contact Carnival Directly and find out. There are cruises which have overnight excursions which meet ships at the next port so i feel it is a legit thing to ask Carnival if it can be done.  - Then report back here and set us all straight 😃

Yes, that could involve fines, if you "miss" the ship in one port and then show up to re-board at a different one.  IF you're talking about two different US ports.

"There are cruises which have overnight excursions which meet ships at the next port"

I'll ask you - can you point me to overnight excursions in Hawaii that meet the ship in the next port?  I think that may be an option on a European cruise, but not in this instance.

 

"i feel it is a legit thing to ask Carnival if it can be done."   

Certainly, ask away.  But the answer will be "no".

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Shmoo here
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Auralee said:

I suspect that the answer would be "Yes - but you'll pay xyz fines!" lol 

 

That won't happen, because Carnival could be fined additionally, because they knowingly allowed it to happen.  EM

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Auralee said:

Ah - well in that case - anonymously ask  what the fines are so you can budget them in. 

 

Penalty for transporting passengers between coastwise points in the United States by a non-coastwise qualified vessel

 

$762.

 

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/12/08/2017-26506/civil-monetary-penalty-adjustments-for-inflation

 

EDITED TO ADD:  that's $762 per person, for each violation.

Edited by Shmoo here
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Kadeeu said:

I would contact Carnival to make sure this is not allowed.  Those citing the PVSA might be confusing a temporary stay off the ship with permanently leaving the ship which the law requires for a violation from what I've read.  You are leaving and arriving from the same port on the same ship and same voyage.  You won't be taken off the ship's manifest.  Who knows if Carnival will even want to deal with the "paperwork", but I would check.    

Yes you will be taken off the manifest, as this is the legal document of who is onboard the ship at any time.  If you miss the ship, the ship is required to file an amended departure manifest as soon as possible after sailing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2019 at 4:49 AM, chengkp75 said:

Yes you will be taken off the manifest, as this is the legal document of who is onboard the ship at any time.  If you miss the ship, the ship is required to file an amended departure manifest as soon as possible after sailing.

Which then creates delays when the ship arrives back in home port...

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2019 at 3:49 AM, chengkp75 said:

Yes you will be taken off the manifest, as this is the legal document of who is onboard the ship at any time.  If you miss the ship, the ship is required to file an amended departure manifest as soon as possible after sailing.

 

Chengkp75 is right.  They keep the manifest for each port as to who is on board when they arrive in port and when they leave the port.  I suspect they keep a manifest of who got off the ship in each port, when they got off and when they got back on.  This information is used to be sure everyone is back on board before departure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When will the out date laws be repealed? I do not see how the benefit anyone. I know they were designed to help the US shipping industry but that ship has sail. Unfortunately no one is trying to change these laws. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Purvis1231 said:

When will the out date laws be repealed? I do not see how the benefit anyone. I know they were designed to help the US shipping industry but that ship has sail. Unfortunately no one is trying to change these laws. 

When you look at it from the narrow parochial viewpoint of the cruise industry, the law may appear to be outdated.  However, the law protects jobs, the economy, and the environment for a wide multitude of vessels in the US like ferries, tour boats (duck, whale watching), dinner cruises, casino boats, water taxis and commuter boats, and large charter fishing boats.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered asking if you could be carried onto the tender and your wheelchair placed and helped getting off etc.  I have seen this many times and it's not a big deal for the workers, unless the water is choppy .  It's nothing to shy away from...🤗

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chengkp75 said:

When you look at it from the narrow parochial viewpoint of the cruise industry, the law may appear to be outdated.  However, the law protects jobs, the economy, and the environment for a wide multitude of vessels in the US like ferries, tour boats (duck, whale watching), dinner cruises, casino boats, water taxis and commuter boats, and large charter fishing boats.

The free market will do a better job in building ships, jobs, and the economy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Purvis1231 said:

The free market will do a better job in building ships, jobs, and the economy. 

And you will take away the hundreds of thousands of jobs for US citizens, when the companies no longer have to hire US crew, or pay US wages, or US taxes.  That is the great part of the free market.  And when these local vessels no longer fly the US flag, believe it or not, they no longer have to meet the more stringent USCG regulations for training, safety, and environmental compliance, only that of foreign flag ships.  Besides, nearly 80 nations have some form of maritime cabotage laws like the PVSA, which restricts coastwise traffic to the home nation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure about getting back ON the ship, but I can tell you 100% that I just boarded a ship in Miami and the next port was Key West (US Port).  In the middle of the night, I had a family member pass away.  This was last Tuesday.  I went to guest relations, paid $758 per person to be able to get off the ship in Key West and go home.  However, I also had to show proof of my airline tickets home.  Without the airline tickets being purchased, they said I couldn't do it.  (not sure what would've happened if it was driving distance because I didn't ask.  I purchased my airline tickets, had the fee charged to my sign sail and they escorted me off the ship in Key West.

 

And in December I did a r/t San Diego/Hawaii and the only foreign port we visited was Ensenada.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, mheinrich said:

And in December I did a r/t San Diego/Hawaii and the only foreign port we visited was Ensenada.  

That's because, on a round trip cruise that begins and ends in the same US port, all that's required is a stop at ANY foreign port.  Ensenada fulfills that requirement.

 

The question raised on this thread is whether a passenger can get on the ship in one US port (San Diego) and get off it in a different US port (Honolulu).  The answer to that is "no", because there's no DISTANT foreign port stop making that a legal cruise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shmoo here said:

That's because, on a round trip cruise that begins and ends in the same US port, all that's required is a stop at ANY foreign port.  Ensenada fulfills that requirement.

 

The question raised on this thread is whether a passenger can get on the ship in one US port (San Diego) and get off it in a different US port (Honolulu).  The answer to that is "no", because there's no DISTANT foreign port stop making that a legal cruise.

 

 

Ahhhhhh thank you for reminding me why I never post in this site.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Cruise Critic's State of the Industry Report - Trends & Future Outlook
      • Q&A: Cruise Insurance with Steve Dasseos of TripInsuranceStore.com
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...