Jump to content

Elevator usage by ADA persons


Recommended Posts

On 5/1/2019 at 3:16 PM, broberts said:

 

No, far from it. For those with mobility restrictions that require elevator use, they have no other option. 

 

I recall observing a scooter bound passenger being unable to get on four or five elevators either because there was no room or other more able waiters were cutting in front. This is silly?

 

Then why didn't you help be calling out those cutting to the front.

 

What it takes is a bit of courtesy, and not accepting poor behavior.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, SRF said:

 

Then why didn't you help be calling out those cutting to the front.

 

What it takes is a bit of courtesy, and not accepting poor behavior.

A lot of times by the time elevator got to deck 8 it was full of able bodied ppl no room for w/c. All they would say “sorry we r full”. It was easy for several to go by before we could get on and many times we had to first go down before we could go up and vice versa when trying to come down from a higher deck. 

 

Even if u call out the cutters by saying something it doesn’t change anything. They just shrug it off and continue on their way in the elevator. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, TravelBug2A said:

A lot of times by the time elevator got to deck 8 it was full of able bodied ppl no room for w/c. All they would say “sorry we r full”. It was easy for several to go by before we could get on and many times we had to first go down before we could go up and vice versa when trying to come down from a higher deck. 

 

Even if u call out the cutters by saying something it doesn’t change anything. They just shrug it off and continue on their way in the elevator. 


News flash -- at peak times, even able-bodied people are met by consecutive full elevators that can't hold a single person more.  That's just the nature of cruise ships.  

I do wish there were a way for sensors on the elevator to "know" when the elevator was at capacity, and then just switch to "express" mode, going directly to the next floor selected by someone inside the elevator and bypassing floors that have called for an elevator.  

When a totally full elevator stops on a floor, it cancels the call light for that elevator lobby, even though it can't take on more passengers.  You also can't hit the button to call another elevator to that floor until the doors close on the totally full elevator, because it just keeps reopening the doors on the elevator that can't hold any more passengers.  In the meantime, elevators that DID have room for more passengers can bypass that floor, because the call button can't be activated.  

I know they've trialed some sort of "smart elevator" system before that uses a computer system to assign you to a particular elevator.  I'd love to see something like that become commonplace!



 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, brillohead said:


News flash -- at peak times, even able-bodied people are met by consecutive full elevators that can't hold a single person more.  That's just the nature of cruise ships.  

I do wish there were a way for sensors on the elevator to "know" when the elevator was at capacity, and then just switch to "express" mode, going directly to the next floor selected by someone inside the elevator and bypassing floors that have called for an elevator.  

When a totally full elevator stops on a floor, it cancels the call light for that elevator lobby, even though it can't take on more passengers.  You also can't hit the button to call another elevator to that floor until the doors close on the totally full elevator, because it just keeps reopening the doors on the elevator that can't hold any more passengers.  In the meantime, elevators that DID have room for more passengers can bypass that floor, because the call button can't be activated.  

I know they've trialed some sort of "smart elevator" system before that uses a computer system to assign you to a particular elevator.  I'd love to see something like that become commonplace!



 

I will tell ya... Those smart elevators on the Carnival Horizon were great. Choose your floor before you get on, and it assigns a specific elevator to you. There was always room for us when the elevator arrived, because if there started being too many for the same direction/floor then it would start assigning a third, fourth car to the same destination. 

 

The problem with the smart elevators... are the not so smart humans, that cannot read and/or follow directions. Even at the end of the week people would get on and say "where are the floor buttons?" 😒   

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TravelBug2A said:

A lot of times by the time elevator got to deck 8 it was full of able bodied ppl no room for w/c. All they would say “sorry we r full”. It was easy for several to go by before we could get on and many times we had to first go down before we could go up and vice versa when trying to come down from a higher deck. 

 

Even if u call out the cutters by saying something it doesn’t change anything. They just shrug it off and continue on their way in the elevator. 

How do you know they were able bodied people, they could have any kind of disability just because you are upright does not mean you do not have a disability that prevents you from using the stairs.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/4/2019 at 2:30 AM, klfrodo said:

If the scooter and others who feel they need a dedicated elevator, I say Make It So. However, be careful what you ask for. Don’t even think about getting on a non scooter elevator. You now have your own Special dedicated Elevator. Not my problem that it’s at the other end of the ship.

This is what worries me. What starts as a way to make life a little easier would soon become a restriction.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Reader0108598 said:

How do you know they were able bodied people, they could have any kind of disability just because you are upright does not mean you do not have a disability that prevents you from using the stairs.

 

Geez... I never said they didn’t have a disability!!! I was ONLY referencing them as able body in a sense that they were all “standers” no other wheelchairs/scooters. I NEVER said they shouldn’t use the elevator as I have NO PROBLEM with anyone wanting to use the elevator (as stated in my first comment on this post)! EVERYONE has a right to use the elevator and I have NO PROBLEM w that!  Please don’t put words in my mouth and make assumptions. Able bodied can be used in many ways as in how u referenced it and how I did! 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, brillohead said:


News flash -- at peak times, even able-bodied people are met by consecutive full elevators that can't hold a single person more.  That's just the nature of cruise ships



 

Exactly!!!!! No problem w that as it’s all part of the experience... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, TravelBug2A said:

A lot of times by the time elevator got to deck 8 it was full of able bodied ppl no room for w/c. All they would say “sorry we r full”. It was easy for several to go by before we could get on and many times we had to first go down before we could go up and vice versa when trying to come down from a higher deck. 

 

Even if u call out the cutters by saying something it doesn’t change anything. They just shrug it off and continue on their way in the elevator. 

I was NOT complaining here like you guys think I was... I was ONLY stating our EXPERIENCE in what it was like for us... EVERYONE has a right to use the elevator and despite this being our only option I have no issues w those that choose elevator over stairs!!  It’s there for EVERYONE... it’s all part of cruising... Please don’t always assume the negative! 

Happy Cruising ! 🙂 

Edited by TravelBug2A
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, TravelBug2A said:

Exactly!!!!! No problem w that as it’s all part of the experience... 

Geez..don't get so bent our of shape 🙂 When you post you can expect and opposing view I did not put words in your mouth … 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Reader0108598
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Reader0108598 said:

Geez..don't get so bent our of shape 🙂 When you post you can expect and opposing view I did not put words in your mouth … 

 

 

 

 

I think what confused some (and it initially confused me), was that you appeared to be thinking that "able bodied" people should get off an elevator that they were already on to accomodate someone in a wheelchair or scooter.  I realize now that wasn't what you meant, but when I first read the comment that was the first thought that came to mind ; ))

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, cruisinagain1960 said:

I think what confused some (and it initially confused me), was that you appeared to be thinking that "able bodied" people should get off an elevator that they were already on to accomodate someone in a wheelchair or scooter.  I realize now that wasn't what you meant, but when I first read the comment that was the first thought that came to mind ; ))

 

Sorry I did not make that clear 🙂 We all have a right to ride the elevator should you jump in front of anyone ..of course not!

Edited by Reader0108598
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/29/2019 at 9:09 PM, 6theagle said:

How often do you have to wait for an elevator on a cruise because there is not enough room for your wheelchair? Can you take the stairs? I am forced to wait for the kindness of strangers or ram them with my chair or scooter, I choose the former, more patient route. Yet, I have waited and watched others older and more ill than I wait and wait while people who CAN take the stairs consume the space.  When I could walk I took the stairs, it was faster and far less frustrating, but I cannot now, and there are lots more like me. We like cruising because it is a little more independent than most travel. 

How fair is this current policy? From my view it isn't 

I have a disability that is not visible. I can't take the stairs because of a heart condition. I look perfectly healthy, but I can't navigate the stairs any better than someone in a chair. I've been run over by people in chairs and scooters. I'm FORCED to wait too and more often than not, people recognize your needs because of the chair, but would never think to put me in front of others and I would never think of asking others to allow me to cut in line to get into the elevator in front of others. After a show, I sit and wait until the elevator bays clear out because I know there will be a crowd. Heading to dinner, I know to plan extra time in case the elevators are crowded. There are ways to get from point A to point B without having to have a dedicated elevator. If you are in a chair and you have others with you, are you just going to run off without them or will you have to wait on them to catch up with you once you use your "dedicated" elevator? You get special assistance to get on and off the ship and people do take into consideration that you are in a chair often. As you said, there are "lots more like me" so are you going to be frustrated when just one dedicated elevator isn't enough? If the dedicated elevator isn't full, should others be allowed to use it? Would RC have to dedicate a member of the crew as "elevator monitor?" Just find a way to wait patiently. That's what I do. I've never told a single group waiting on a elevator that I have a medical condition and need to be moved to the front of the line. I wait with my family and we ALL use the elevator at the same time because we are all going to the same place.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Reader0108598 said:

Geez..don't get so bent our of shape 🙂 When you post you can expect and opposing view I did not put words in your mouth … 

 

 

 

 

If u would have read my original comment you would of not needed to assume nor would you have misunderstood me 🙂 So yes I had every right to react the way I did. And yes everybody has a right to their own opinion which I totally respect. Have a wonderful dayAnd yes everybody has a right to their own opinion which I totally respect. Have a wonderful day

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, griffy116 said:

I have a disability that is not visible. I can't take the stairs because of a heart condition. I look perfectly healthy, but I can't navigate the stairs any better than someone in a chair. I've been run over by people in chairs and scooters. I'm FORCED to wait too and more often than not, people recognize your needs because of the chair, but would never think to put me in front of others and I would never think of asking others to allow me to cut in line to get into the elevator in front of others. After a show, I sit and wait until the elevator bays clear out because I know there will be a crowd. Heading to dinner, I know to plan extra time in case the elevators are crowded. There are ways to get from point A to point B without having to have a dedicated elevator. If you are in a chair and you have others with you, are you just going to run off without them or will you have to wait on them to catch up with you once you use your "dedicated" elevator? You get special assistance to get on and off the ship and people do take into consideration that you are in a chair often. As you said, there are "lots more like me" so are you going to be frustrated when just one dedicated elevator isn't enough? If the dedicated elevator isn't full, should others be allowed to use it? Would RC have to dedicate a member of the crew as "elevator monitor?" Just find a way to wait patiently. That's what I do. I've never told a single group waiting on a elevator that I have a medical condition and need to be moved to the front of the line. I wait with my family and we ALL use the elevator at the same time because we are all going to the same place.

Same here invisible disability. I don't want special attention ,Happy cruising! 🙂

 

 

Edited by Reader0108598
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, TravelBug2A said:

If u would have read my original comment you would of not needed to assume nor would you have misunderstood me 🙂 So yes I had every right to react the way I did. And yes everybody has a right to their own opinion which I totally respect. Have a wonderful dayAnd yes everybody has a right to their own opinion which I totally respect. Have a wonderful day

You have a great day! 🙂

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry your having issues using the elevator. When I see someone in a wheelchair or with a cane or walker I let them go in ahead of me. 

 

I sometimes need to use the elevator but for the most part I take the stairs. 

 

Elevators are on a first come first served basis. 

 

If you are not getting into elevators please report it to Guest Services. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One idea is to have an elevator with an operator and the elevator door remains open until the operator keys the floor. 

 

Your SeaPass would have a wheelchair symbol or sticker to indicate disability whether it's visual, physical or other disability. 

 

This card gives you priority to accessible seating at shows, dining, pool etc. 

 

If you do not have this sticker or printed image you will be kindly directed to the non disabled seating or elevator. 

Edited by travelplus
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, brillohead said:


News flash -- at peak times, even able-bodied people are met by consecutive full elevators that can't hold a single person more.  That's just the nature of cruise ships.  

I do wish there were a way for sensors on the elevator to "know" when the elevator was at capacity, and then just switch to "express" mode, going directly to the next floor selected by someone inside the elevator and bypassing floors that have called for an elevator.  

When a totally full elevator stops on a floor, it cancels the call light for that elevator lobby, even though it can't take on more passengers.  You also can't hit the button to call another elevator to that floor until the doors close on the totally full elevator, because it just keeps reopening the doors on the elevator that can't hold any more passengers.  In the meantime, elevators that DID have room for more passengers can bypass that floor, because the call button can't be activated.  

I know they've trialed some sort of "smart elevator" system before that uses a computer system to assign you to a particular elevator.  I'd love to see something like that become commonplace!


Reserve an elevator via the Digital Signage boards or Royal App. It will alert you at 60,30 and 15 seconds before your elevator arrives via a board by the elevator. Now boarding passengers 001 in elevator#2. 

 


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, travelplus said:

Your SeaPass would have a wheelchair symbol osticker to indicate disability whether it's visual, physical or other disability. 

 

No lawyer but not sure it's legal to brand people with a disability by marking their seapass card.  

 

27 minutes ago, travelplus said:

One idea is to have an elevator with an operator and the elevator door remains open until the operator keys the floor. 

 

More operational costs plus it would need it's own call button on each floor otherwise how would a disabled guest call for an elevator?  It would cost significantly to modify the ships and add separate call buttons.   

 

Let's go down that road.  Spend millions to retrofit ships and hire additional crew to operate the elevators.  A scooter goes into an elevator.  Elevator is now at scooter/wheelchair capacity.  Off it goes to deliver the guest to their destination not stopping at any other floor because it's at capacity.  Now disabled guests on multiple floors want to go somewhere.  How does the operator decide which floor is next?  It's peak time with the theater just released but a disabled guest on the pool deck needs to get to their cabin.  Make them wait 20-30 minutes and just do runs from the theater deck since it's peak time?   By now a disabled guest on their cabin deck wants to go to dinner, or the windjammer or the promenade but they have to wait too for the theater disabled crowd to be serviced.    

 

If you dedicate an elevator to this role it does not improve service for disabled guests because now they have just a single elevator they can use.  It costs millions and requires hiring more crew.  Remaining guests now have more wait times and crowding since they have one less elevator to service their needs.  It solves nothing but increases cruise fares and everyone, disabled and regular guests both have longer wait times. 

 

Six months later it's deemed a failure and deactivated.  Yet we all have higher cruise fares to pay for the modifications.

Edited by twangster
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, SRF said:

 

Then why didn't you help be calling out those cutting to the front.

 

What it takes is a bit of courtesy, and not accepting poor behavior.

 

I have done so, why would you think otherwise?

 

Sadly it takes more than an intolerance of poor behavior. As I have said many times, one of the most significant problems is that at busy times elevators often arrive too full to accommodate a scooter. Perhaps you could educate me as to how polite behavior resolves this particular problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/30/2019 at 1:02 AM, brillohead said:

I don't think that those with disabilities should automatically get to cut in line for every single thing.  Wait your turn, just like everyone else.  

I do wish that the cruise lines would stop allowing scooter rentals and switch to the "hoveround" or "jazzy chair" or whatever -- more of an electric wheelchair than a scooter.  The scooter, with its front wheel(s) and steering wheel takes up a lot more room, and it also gives the user a bit of a barrier in the front that they bash into things/people. 

With an electric wheelchair instead of a scooter, the person has nothing in front of them besides their own feet.  They can better see where they are going, and they can't use the front of scooter as a battering ram to force people to bend to their will.  

If someone is bringing their own scooter from home, by all means let them bring it aboard.  But I think in many cases the people on scooters on the ship don't use one at home, and they aren't proficient at maneuvering them nor do they understand \etiquette regarding running into things. 

Making rental equipment be the smaller wheelchair type rather than the golfcart-esque scooter type could help with both size constraints as well as common decency like not running into people.

 

I am handicapped, but rarely use a wheelchair at home, as my apartment is small. I rent a scooter to go on cruises because I can't walk more than a few hundred feet without stopping. Electric wheelchairs, while nice because they take up less room and have a much tighter turning radius, are a challenge to navigate because the joystick control is hypersensitive. I tried using a friend's as a test when we were at our local pool and I almost ran the thing into the water because it is much harder to control than the scooters I've used. Trust me, you don't want someone who has never used the joystick models to get their practice on a crowded ship. Oh, and the footrest on an electric wheelchair can do some damage. Don't ask me how I know.

 

Also, I don't believe people in chairs or scooters should be able to cut in line. I feel that it should be first come, first served, but it often isn't that way, as able bodied people will push past. In another thread, I recounted where a woman actually fell into my lap while she was shoving to get past me.

 

I normally "pack my patience" and wait for a long time after muster drill and after shows because I don't feel like sitting in the elevator lobby, but sometimes I just want to go back to my cabin.

 

On 4/30/2019 at 10:41 AM, mets123 said:

using elevators, we rely on the kindness of others. We don't expect special treatment because we realized others paid for their vacation s just as we have. We appreciate it when others have allowed us to go in before them, even if they were there first, and they now have to wait for another elevator.

 

what we do not appreciate is the ignorant people who try to sneak around us while my wife tries to get it. Or those who just push their way in. Or better yet, those who close the door when they see us coming, and there are only two people inside.

 

don't flame me. It happens more than once on every cruise.

 

Bless those that help us. Pray for the others that they are never in my wife's situation. Payback is a b...... Just my two cents.

Preach it, brother! I often think my grandma is laughing at me from heaven because I used to get impatient with her and now I have some of the same physical issues she had.

 

15 hours ago, 2wheelin said:

And you just stood by and watched? How about stepping up and helping them by “commandeering” the next elevator when their turn came up and holding the door FOR THEM.

We could all do this when we see someone waiting. Great idea by another poster to enlist the aid of children as a teaching opportunity.

I wrote on another thread that on my last cruise, I had been waiting for a long time while multiple elevators were taken by people shoving past me. Finally, this tiny woman stood in the door of the next elevator and shouted "STOP, THIS WOMAN HAS BEEN WAITING" and stepped aside for me to go. I thanked her profusely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you need an elevator and need to go up,  walk down a deck, if able, and go up.  On embarking day everyone wants to go to the WJ.  Push the down button and get a ride that will go back up.  After the shows, walk toward the center of the ship and have an easy ride to where you need to go.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Clarea locked this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Thank You for 25 Years - Click for Fun Stuff!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...