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Moxiefurball

Did I really need to buy a voltage converter for Italy

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I know the voltage is 220. 

Are iPhones and iPads really dual voltage which means they can be used in Italy just with the normal adapters?  

 

if you plug in a dual voltage appliance into a converter would it hurt the device?

 

I did buy a converter and now I’m thinking all I really needed it for was for my DW hairdryer which is not dual voltage for sure.

 

all responses greatly appreciated 

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Right - I use my iphone and ipad in Europe - no problems at all. You need only an adaptor for the plug/receptacle - no converter needed.

Edited by dogs4fun

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Indeed, in general, electronics (as opposed to electrics with motors) are pretty universally dual voltage/frequency.  To be 100% sure, look for the (legally required, I'm pretty sure) wording on the power supply for the device.  You may need a magnifier, but it will likely mention: "Input 100-240V, 50-60Hz", in which case you are covered for worldwide power as long as you have the cheap plug adapter needed.

 

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On 6/1/2019 at 8:28 AM, Langoustine said:

And it is often cheaper to buy a 220v hair dryer in Europe than a converter.

Exactly!

 

We bought a 220  hair dryer in the UK and a <$5 plug adapter to the Europe plug (2 pin) style and it works almost everywhere over there. Including on the ship that offers European two pin outlets as well as the US outlet.

 

gary

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We bought a dual voltage travel hairdryer at Wal-Mart for about $25 (few years ago). Consider this option if you don't want to go hair dryer shopping during your vacation time. 

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With the hair appliances that heat up (dryers, flat irons, curling irons, etc.) the dual voltage ones aren't that great.  For most people the amount of heat they put out is fine but for folks with thick/heavy hair that really needs high power, the dual voltage units just won't cut it.

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I am not a big fan of voltage converters.  The good ones are quite heavy and they can generate a lot of heat.  As others posted, there are plenty of electronics that can handle duel voltage and then all you need is a very inexpensive (and light) adaptor which are readily available online or in the luggage departments of many stores.

 

Do not depend on others to tell you whether something is duel voltage.  Simply look at the information which is generally stamped on to your device.  On many chargers for computers (and other electronics) it will be right on the plug (you might need a magnifying glass to read the fine print).  If it says something like "110 -240 VAC" then you have duel voltage.  If it says something like 110-120 then you have a problem :(.  The "VAC" simply means "volts alternating current."

 

Hank

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I have stayed in hotels in Italy and Spain.  Most electronic devices today can be used with just a plug adapter as long as their power supply states they work with 120/240 VAC and 50/60 Hz.  This is only for electronic devices such as cell phones, laptop computers, tablets, battery chargers, cameras and so on.  Anything that has a motor will not work properly because it is not just the voltage but also the frequency.,  A voltage converter is pretty much useless these days because it does not convert frequency.  It reduces voltage but its output is still 50 Hz.  So anything with a motor such as a hairdrier  or shaver will run at a slower speed if put in the adapter.  A hairdrier is also a high current devices and will likely blow the fuse of the voltage adapter before you will notice it runs slower.

 

Ships electrical systems may also pose a problem with frequency.  All ships I have been on offer both US and European plugs with the correct voltage but they were all 60 Hz, same as the ship's own electric system.  I think that the outlets were labeled as such.  Since ships are built in different countries, this may ba different depending on the cruise line.

Edited by luisrp

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Look for an adapter with USB ports in it.  No need to bring the plug for your devices, just the cord.  My travel hair dryer is dual voltage, so we didn't need a converter.  

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