Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
jasardeax

No dress code on Viking River

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Canal archive said:

Whoops should have been achieve, frodian slip. CA

I don't know. Looks more like Apple auto-correct to me. And now you are sounding very Lord of the Rings-ish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/18/2019 at 5:05 PM, KatieMcKay said:

Luggage isn’t a problem as on international flights, you can check through one bag for free.

Downsides of checking luggage is not limited to dollar cost. I have NEVER lost a bag or had one go astray that I carried as personal carry-on - a far better record than airlines have. I have never spent over an hour waiting for luggage to arrive since I quit checking luggage. I have never had a handle ripped off a suitcase since I quit checking luggage. 

 

I learned a long time ago that you can own your luggage or it can own you. It is possible to go to any continent with carry-on luggage; I know because I’ve done it to every continent. Laundry is your friend; you might see me in the same clothes every few days, but they will be clean. The last time I dined on a ship in anything less than a collared shirt (and appropriate pants) was on Windjammer Barefoot Cruises in the 1970s. I have done transAtlantic cruises followed by multiple weeks in Europe with carry-on. 

 

I don’t begrudge others taking lots of stuff, but I sure don’t want to hear complaints about heavy suitcases etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, TravelerThom said:

Downsides of checking luggage is not limited to dollar cost. I have NEVER lost a bag or had one go astray that I carried as personal carry-on - a far better record than airlines have. I have never spent over an hour waiting for luggage to arrive since I quit checking luggage. I have never had a handle ripped off a suitcase since I quit checking luggage. 

 

I learned a long time ago that you can own your luggage or it can own you. It is possible to go to any continent with carry-on luggage; I know because I’ve done it to every continent. Laundry is your friend; you might see me in the same clothes every few days, but they will be clean. The last time I dined on a ship in anything less than a collared shirt (and appropriate pants) was on Windjammer Barefoot Cruises in the 1970s. I have done transAtlantic cruises followed by multiple weeks in Europe with carry-on. 

 

I don’t begrudge others taking lots of stuff, but I sure don’t want to hear complaints about heavy suitcases etc. 

 

Well, you hit most of our reasons for carry-on only but I would add to the list:

  • Nothing ever stolen from bags that never leave your possession
  • Bags never opened for inspection except in your presence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those of you extolling the virtues of carry-on only must be from the US.  Here in Australia we are only allowed 7kg carry on, anything over must be checked.

 

While I am quite a light packer, there is no way I can pack for a three week European holiday in the winter with a total of 7kg - and that is including my handbag, which I think you call a purse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody has mentioned how TSA regulations limit what you can put in a carry-on.  For that reason alone we will always want to check at least one bag, and so why not go for one each?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Host Jazzbeau said:

Nobody has mentioned how TSA regulations limit what you can put in a carry-on.  For that reason alone we will always want to check at least one bag, and so why not go for one each?

 

So far, it has not been an issue. There is nothing that I must take that must go into checked luggage because I can't buy it when I get there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, djh1959 said:

Those of you extolling the virtues of carry-on only must be from the US.  Here in Australia we are only allowed 7kg carry on, anything over must be checked.

 

While I am quite a light packer, there is no way I can pack for a three week European holiday in the winter with a total of 7kg - and that is including my handbag, which I think you call a purse.

I have yet to encounter an international flight where a handbag/ purse weight was included in your carry-on weight. Maybe you can show where that is true, but for instance QANTAS https://www.qantas.com/us/en/travel-info/baggage/carry-on-baggage.html#carry-on-baggage-allowances says:

 

In addition to your carry-on baggage allowance, you may also carry onboard one small personal item such as a handbag, laptop computer*, overcoat, small camera, a reasonable amount of reading material or a small amount of duty free goods (where permitted).

 

In the US Carry on rules vary greatly between airlines and enforcement of those rules can vary from flight to flight even on the same airline. 7kg enforcement does make carry-on more challenging. 7 years ago before 7kg I flew domestically to Fort Lauderdale, caught a TransAtlantic cruise to Amsterdam, stayed 4 days, flew to Bergen, took Hurtigruten to Kirkenes and back, flew to Iceland, and finally back to US. My carry-on even included a tuxedo (perhaps the last time I bothered to take that on a cruise), but 7kg would now pretty well exclude taking the tux.

 

Two of the airlines I use (Lan Chile and Lufthansa) are generally pretty rigorous at enforcement of their 7kg limit, but I can meet that bar with careful planning. Examples: 1) For an April Douro River Cruise plus pre and post extensions I flew PHL-FRA-LIS on LH; my hand luggage and my personal item were each less than 7kg, and each was weighted by LH; I was wearing my warmth layers (including a blue blazer) and goretex raincoat (with Tilley rain/ sun hat in the pocket) and a pair of medium weight waterproof hiking shoes; hand luggage included a second pair of khaki pants, 3 sets of underwear, socks, and shirts, a pair of respectable shoes, rain/ wind pants (I could have worn these on the plane if necessary to meet the weight allotment) plus inflatable pillow, toiletries etc. First day tour in Lisbon was in a gale with 50 knot winds and pelting rain; I think I was the only person out of 100 who stayed dry and wasn’t complaining about the weather. I also was one of the few at the Captain’s Dinner wearing a sport coat/ blazer. 

2) For a November/December 14 day cruise Ushuaia r/t to Antarctica cruise preceded by a week DIY extension in Uruguay and Northern Argentina it was slightly more complicated as more warm weather (25-30 degree C) clothes were needed, but this was offset by expedition provided outer coat and the fact that you are not allowed to wear your own boots ashore (the expedition provided boots were sanitized before each landing) - so my footwear for the plane was my good black leather walking shoes and my carry on included Teva hiking sandals. I easily passed LAN Chile’s inspection. 

 

I understand that not  everyone is willing to do the planning to get down to only carry-on, and that not everyone is willing to go with only four sets of clothes (and do the resulting laundry). But carry-on is possible; I have done it to all seven continents and was happy to do so without being owned by my luggage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TravelerThom said:

I have yet to encounter an international flight where a handbag/ purse weight was included in your carry-on weight. Maybe you can show where that is true, but for instance QANTAS https://www.qantas.com/us/en/travel-info/baggage/carry-on-baggage.html#carry-on-baggage-allowances says:

 

We always fly Emirates.  If we are lucky enough to go business you are allowed two pieces of carry on but only one in economy:

 

Economy Class

Economy Class passengers are permitted one piece of carry-on baggage, subject to the following size and weight limitations:

handbag_tcm233-242435.jpg Carry-on baggage: 55 x 38 x 20cm (22 x 15 x 8 inches)Carry-on baggage: 55 by 38 by 20 centimeters (22 by 15 by 8 inches)

 

Weight must not exceed 7kg kilograms (15lb pounds). Duty free purchases of liquor, cigarettes and perfume in reasonable quantities are also permitted in addition to the above.

 

To be fair, I have never had mine weighed, but the point is you cannot risk having more or they won't let you take it on and it needs to be checked.

 

I have heard of many people having theirs weighed and the one piece rule being enforced, we have just been lucky so far, but I do obey their rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since this topic has come up often, I decided to walk around the dining room several times on our back-to-back Viking River Cruises this month (Elbe and Eastern Europe). I saw people dressed like we are in the picture. No one was dressed sloppily in my opinion. We average about .5 sport coats per night and I never saw fancy dresses. I always wear khakis and a button up shirt. I was pretty average in my dressing vs. the other guests. 

 

After 13 cruises on Viking, one of the things I like best about Viking is that I don’t have to buy dress up clothes to go on a vacation. I donated my last suit to Goodwill in 1998. I don’t even own a tie. 

 

My experience on Viking has been no sloppy dressers and very few were overdressed. 

C9ED08A2-2922-4C9D-AAFD-AC2BA768A171.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At risk of setting off a firestorm here, I am going to offer another opinion on the issue of carefully planning your wardrobe so that that you can fit it into your carry on - and therefore not check luggage...

 

I am ok with that - as long as you are not one of those people who feels entitled to take the maximum carry on allowed (or stretching it a bit, because, after all - it is only a few more inches, or a few more pounds...) and then fighting to cram it into the overhead bins.  That is one of my biggest "pet peeves" with the airlines today... they set standards for carry on, and then don't enforce it.

 

I don't accept the "everyone else does it, so why can't I" defense... I find it rude, and inconsiderate to the rest of us who try to be respectful of the limited cabin space. And don't get me going on the people that decide to "drop" their (often oversized) carry on into an overhead bin a few dozen rows ahead of their seat.  

 

I don't like paying for checked bags anymore that anyone else does...  And, have been frustrated when a bag has been delayed (or "misplaced") when I am just starting my vacation.  But, do not feel that I should be expected to voluntarily relinquish space in the overhead bin by my seat in order for another person to claim "extra" space so that they can bypass the luggage carousel.

 

Fran

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/21/2019 at 9:57 AM, djh1959 said:

Those of you extolling the virtues of carry-on only must be from the US.  Here in Australia we are only allowed 7kg carry on, anything over must be checked.

It's very much airline dependent in a lot of the world, e.g. British Airways allow a 56cm x 45cm x 25cm carry-on plus a 40cm x 30cm x 15cm hand/laptop bag each weighing up to 23kg in all classes on both long and short haul, quite generous as the basic checked baggage limit is 23kg. I'd love to see someone managing 46kg of hand luggage plus a carrier bag or two of duty-frees.

 

Heathrow Airport are apparently introducing CT scanners at security which will remove the need for the limit on liquids in hand luggage: if that gets rolled out across the world then people who travel light will find things a lot easier so long as their carrier has a reasonable weight limit for carry-ons. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I agree it's a problem when the weight limit for carry ons is low.  Gee, even just the empty bag weighs a few pounds!  In the US, we can always manage with a carry on only because I have never encountered a weight limit for US flight carry ons, only size limits.  On International flights, we do always have to check a bag because there is no way for us to pack clothes, camera, health and beauty aids, shoes, etc., and keep within a relatively low weight limit.  Fortunately, most international flights allow one free checked bag, and we seek those airlines out.  So far, we have not had to pay to check a bag, and hope we won't have to in the future.  Steverhodes, I enjoyed your picture.  That is the dress I was expecting on my upcoming river cruise.  Everyone looks neat and clean, no one over or under dressed.  I am now confident in what I am planning on packing.  Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On our Viking River Cruise we had people at dinner in cargo shorts, t shirts, and flip flops. One guy wore a wife beater most everyday and night, then raise Cain if any of the attendants stop him going into a cathedral.  Cruises and cruisers vary, it like a box of chocolates. Viking invites those cruisers by not setting and enforcing a dress code at dinner. I suppose Viking feels they need to sail on some line so they may as well take their money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pinotlover said:

One guy wore a wife beater most everyday and night, then raise Cain if any of the attendants stop him going into a cathedral.  

 

I'm sorry, there is no excuse for that.  And for those posters who are going to come along and say what someone else wears doesn't impact the enjoyment of their meals, a man in a wife beater most certainly does.

 

Roz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, pinotlover said:

One guy wore a wife beater most everyday and night, then raise Cain if any of the attendants stop him going into a cathedral.

 

Yes, there is a word for people who behave like this but I'm just too polite to use it here. Unfortunately, it takes a lot more than a dress-code infraction to get banned for life from a cruise line--and without just cause, cruise lines can deny passage to anyone who pays the fare. It is up to Viking to enforce the dress codes that it has established and I really wish that they would do it.

 

Roz, I'm with you. That which is exposed by a men's tank-type shirt comes under my category of bodily parts I do not wish to gaze upon at the dinner table.

 

 

Edited by Peregrina651

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did run into this "tank top" attire on one river cruise.  Thankfully, it IS the exception in my experience. Restaurant or Hotel manager needs to step up respectfully but firmly in these rare instances.  Loss of such a guest's future business will increase customer satisfaction for the 190-2 other guests.
What I like the least is a day of hot sweaty touring and then straight off to the shared dinner table without cleaning up.
Yeah, I'm a guy, don't mind sports locker rooms but not sweat soaked clothes at an otherwise really nice dinner venue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Peregrina651 said:

and without just cause, cruise lines can deny passage to anyone who pays the fare.

 

Apologies. I do wish that my fingers would type what my brain is saying. Needless to say, I failed touch typing in junior high.

 

The can in the quoted sentence should be can't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay two countries but supposedly the same language, I think not what on earth is a ‘wife beater’, answers as clean as possible please for my obviously gentile ears 😇

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Tank top style undershirts for men are called "wife-beaters" because they appear in a lot of American movies from the 30s and 40s in which uncouth (often ethnic working-class) husbands wear them while abusing their wives physically and/or emotionally.

 

An example would be Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski in "A Streetcar Named Desire".

 

Roz

Edited by Roz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basketball tank top type jerseys with large cut out underarms also fit the definition of a wife beater. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, pinotlover said:

Basketball tank top type jerseys with large cut out underarms also fit the definition of a wife beater. 

You for got to add hairy armpits...Riff Raff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

As to the packing comments, it’s really an each to his own deal. I hate dragging even small suitcases around an airport. Also hate it when I attempt to enter an airport eatery and all of the aisles in the seating areas are blocked by suitcase carryons!

 

It’s kind of a game, much like the current rave on living in a “tiny house “. Minimization has its limits for us. I still utilize and enjoy Uniworld and Oceania’s free laundry to help in some minimization. My carryon is a small light camera backpack that also contains my Bose headphones, kindle, and passport. My carryon is always under the 7kg limits of even the strictest of Airlines. The rest the airline can move.

Edited by pinotlover

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 1:33 PM, jasardeax said:

Just back from Amsterdam to Basel river cruise on the Viking Einar. 

I was surprised that there was absolutely no dress code for the dining room. I wasn’t surprised that this was the case for breakfast and lunch, but it also held true for dinner.

Although many people dressed “country club casual” for dinner, and looked  very 

nice, cut-off shorts, men’s sleeveless tee 

shirts, running shorts, tee shirts with inappropriate language, torn blue jeans, and men’s caps were worn by more than a few every night. 

I’m sure this lack of a dress code for dinner will be welcome by some, and not so welcoming to others. 

 

 

Actually Viking does have a dress code but the staff never enforces it. They don't recommend people wear shorts, t-shirts and flip-flops for dinner in the main dining room but there are always a few passengers who simply don't care. Typically on the first day of embarkation, passengers do get very casual. However, majority of passengers are casual but elegant for dinner. We have never seen anyone wearing suits, ties and tux except just one time when the couple was celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. Here's the exact dress code verbiage from Viking:

 

"Dress during the day is casual including shorts (if the season is warm), trousers or jeans and comfortable shoes for walking tours. There are no “formal nights” and recommended evening dress is “elegant casual” such as a dress, skirt or slacks with a sweater or blouse for ladies; for gentlemen, trousers and a collared shirt. Ties and jackets are optional. We suggest you pack comfortable walking shoes, dressier shoes, a collapsible umbrella/lightweight rain gear; items you can layer like lightweight jackets/sweaters; sunglasses, a sun hat/visor, sunscreen; and toiletries including a travel-sized hand sanitizer. Depending on the season and destination, you may also want to add a warm coat, gloves and water-resistant footwear." 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • SAIL-AWAY GIVEAWAY - Enter for a chance to win a $3,000 Norwegian Cruise Line Gift Card
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...