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High Tea


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1 minute ago, Mynki said:

But is scone pronounce scone like 'gone' or 'bone'? 

That's the real question.... 😁

 

 

The Queen would say as bone, depending where you live it would be as gone

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3 hours ago, Mynki said:

Indeed. But more importantly should it be jam or cream on first? 😁

scone.jpg

Oh no!  I've always put cream first (since that's what it's all about for me), BUT now I have an urge to book a cruise just to compare the 2 methods! 

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5 hours ago, Mynki said:

Indeed. But more importantly should it be jam or cream on first? 😁

scone.jpg

 

Cream!

 

4 hours ago, Mynki said:

But is scone pronounce scone like 'gone' or 'bone'? 

That's the real question.... 😁

 

 

Definitely “bone”!  

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37 minutes ago, Marelaine said:

Please, could one of our English community members define 'tea,' 'cream tea,' and 'high tea.' 
 



Tea = Another word for dinner. Most people would say they eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in that order every day. But perhaps a little confusingly to others some people will say they eat breakfast, dinner and 'tea'. 

Cream Tea = A snack consisting of scones, jam and clotted cream served in the afternoon with tea (the beverage to drink). It has a long history in the UK traditionally served in the counties of Devon and Cornwall. They argue about the correct way to serve cream tea hence the posts about should you add jam or cream first. An age old argument / joke / discussion amongst Brits that really shouldn't be taken too seriously. The queen is well known to serve cream tea with jam on first pleasing those from Cornwall.... Yes it's all true. You couldn't make it up! 

High Tea = Is a phrase given to a working class meal served in the late afternoon or early evening with a cup of tea. Hence some people using the word 'tea' for their evening meal. 

You also have 'Afternoon tea' which has more upper class origins and would consist of tea served with cakes and sandwiches. This is what the thread refers to. The 'meal' would not be as filling as a 'high tea' which was eaten by workers after a long day. 

The phrase 'high tea; is regularly confused with 'afternoon tea'. :) 

Hope that all makes sense? :) 

We'll do the breadcake vs Bap vs Roll debate another day.....

 

Edited by Mynki
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14 hours ago, Shadow9612 said:

30 varieties of fresh brewed tea??  Wow!

 

Yes.  Waiters took orders and then brought each person their own little pot of tea and a three tier display of scones, sweets and mini sandwiches.  Had to be very careful not to eat too much and ruin my dinner.

 

X does theirs nicely as well.  Food offerings very good.  Tea selection not as varied and it's sometimes difficult to grab a waiter to obtain a refill.

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13 hours ago, Mynki said:

But is scone pronounce scone like 'gone' or 'bone'? 
 

 

gone or bone or none or one

 

Ah, the inconsistencies of the English language, even the geographic/regional differences between people who learn English as their first language.

 

Another example:  cough, though, through, rough, bough

 

No wonder it is so hard to learn English as a second language.

 

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9 hours ago, Baron Barracuda said:

Tea selection not as varied and it's sometimes difficult to grab a waiter to obtain a refill.

This is why I wish they had brewed tea regularly being refilled, because I'm often waiting to try to find somebody to bring another little tea pot of hot water and then have to wait a few minutes for the tea to brew.

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1 hour ago, Guindalf said:

We’ll get into the ‘milk first ‘ or ‘tea first’ discussion next!

 

As a Brit living in the US, I’ll take it however I can get it!

A friend of mine used to always stop their day at the cottage mid-morning for tea, and mid-afternoon for tea. However, in the morning they put milk in first, and in the afternoon they put the tea in first. I mistakenly made tea for them in the wrong order one time, and boy did I get in trouble 🙄. But I really don't understand what's the difference??

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4 hours ago, Shadow9612 said:

A friend of mine used to always stop their day at the cottage mid-morning for tea, and mid-afternoon for tea. However, in the morning they put milk in first, and in the afternoon they put the tea in first. I mistakenly made tea for them in the wrong order one time, and boy did I get in trouble 🙄. But I really don't understand what's the difference??

Don't ask me. I'm a heathen who adds milk to Earl Grey! What would I know? :classic_biggrin:

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IIRC, it originally depended on the quality of the tea cup. If it was a fine or more fragile china cup, milk first. Then when the hot tea was poured in, chances are it would not damage the cup. If a more sturdy china cup, it was okay for the hot tea to go in first then the milk. Since the posh folks usually had the finer china, they went milk first.

 

Nowadays, I assume it boils down to the tea serving ritual you were raised with and who was "Mother".

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On 6/23/2019 at 11:24 AM, Mynki said:



Tea = Another word for dinner. Most people would say they eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in that order every day. But perhaps a little confusingly to others some people will say they eat breakfast, dinner and 'tea'. 

Cream Tea = A snack consisting of scones, jam and clotted cream served in the afternoon with tea (the beverage to drink). It has a long history in the UK traditionally served in the counties of Devon and Cornwall. They argue about the correct way to serve cream tea hence the posts about should you add jam or cream first. An age old argument / joke / discussion amongst Brits that really shouldn't be taken too seriously. The queen is well known to serve cream tea with jam on first pleasing those from Cornwall.... Yes it's all true. You couldn't make it up! 

High Tea = Is a phrase given to a working class meal served in the late afternoon or early evening with a cup of tea. Hence some people using the word 'tea' for their evening meal. 

You also have 'Afternoon tea' which has more upper class origins and would consist of tea served with cakes and sandwiches. This is what the thread refers to. The 'meal' would not be as filling as a 'high tea' which was eaten by workers after a long day. 

The phrase 'high tea; is regularly confused with 'afternoon tea'. 🙂

Hope that all makes sense? 🙂

We'll do the breadcake vs Bap vs Roll debate another day.....

 

 

Thank you, Mynki. Many of us Americans think 'high tea' means 'fancy.' Your explanation makes perfect sense. As for scones, I like to split them in half and put cream on one side and jam on the other 🙂

 

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38 minutes ago, Marelaine said:

 

Thank you, Mynki. Many of us Americans think 'high tea' means 'fancy.' Your explanation makes perfect sense. As for scones, I like to split them in half and put cream on one side and jam on the other 🙂

 

 

Yep. High tea really just means dinner. :) 

Personally I always put the jam on first followed by the cream. Then I'll grab a second scone and do the opposite. Then if I still can't decide which is best, I'll grab a third and just go cream, jam, more cream followed by a bit more jam. Works for me. :classic_biggrin:

Edited by Mynki
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On 6/23/2019 at 4:57 AM, Mynki said:

Indeed. But more importantly should it be jam or cream on first? 😁

scone.jpg

LOL, I will be most happy to run a 7 day experiment for you in about 62 days on the Summit.  Personally I'm a cream first, then jam type, but I'm open to switching it up. 

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16 hours ago, Shadow9612 said:

A friend of mine used to always stop their day at the cottage mid-morning for tea, and mid-afternoon for tea. However, in the morning they put milk in first, and in the afternoon they put the tea in first. I mistakenly made tea for them in the wrong order one time, and boy did I get in trouble 🙄. But I really don't understand what's the difference??

My cousin (her Mom born in Hertforshire, England) who lived in Victoria, BC - always added milk first to her tea cup....she made the best tea - steeped it just the right amount of time!   Miss her greatly!

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My dad, who I lost last year (and lost mum too), always loved the way I made tea for him. Surprising really as mum and I were both coffee drinkers!  

 

I’ve lived in the states for the last 21 years, so not a lot of tea made or drunk in a long time. 

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12 hours ago, luvtravel said:

My cousin (her Mom born in Hertforshire, England) who lived in Victoria, BC - always added milk first to her tea cup....she made the best tea - steeped it just the right amount of time!   Miss her greatly!

 

 

If it’s out of a pot, milk first but if a tea bag is put directly in the cup, then it’s milk last 😉.

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19 hours ago, TxCityKat said:

IIRC, it originally depended on the quality of the tea cup. If it was a fine or more fragile china cup, milk first. Then when the hot tea was poured in, chances are it would not damage the cup. If a more sturdy china cup, it was okay for the hot tea to go in first then the milk. Since the posh folks usually had the finer china, they went milk first.

 

Nowadays, I assume it boils down to the tea serving ritual you were raised with and who was "Mother".

This is right but wrong way around. The fine china could take the hot water so it was "posh" to pour water first. The "lower" classes used clay cups etc so put milk in first to cool the brew 

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Just as a little by the way there is a traditional London bus that does a tour while you eat afternoon tea on it! After sightseeing all morning an easy way to do a bit more in the afternoon...Not experienced myself but a friend enjoyed. Easy to google if you are interested.

 

We always request a kettle and tea tray set up when we board and have not been refused yet. We brew our own tea and then get the butler to deliver a small selection of mini sandwiches and cakes to our suite. A great way to wake up after an afternoon nap! Only snag is getting the butler to understand ‘small’ selection...

 

 

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Best teas we've been to were on QM 2, a dressy  afternoon event with music  ; and another time  at the beautiful  Chateau Frontenec  in Quebec.  Did the latter with ladies from my roll call ..while dh found a place for his cigar..

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58 minutes ago, hcat said:

Best teas we've been to were on QM 2, a dressy  afternoon event with music  ; and another time  at the beautiful  Chateau Frontenec  in Quebec.  Did the latter with ladies from my roll call ..while dh found a place for his cigar..

One of the nicest teas I've been to was with my DM in St George, Bermuda at the Lili Bermuda Perfumery gardens.  It was so pretty; we had traditional afternoon tea but iced instead of hot(it was 80+ degrees!).  The other was many years ago at the Pierre Hotel in NYC, very posh setting, beautiful tea service.  The Chateu Frontenac is amazing, no tea there but their bar and cocktails are lovely.

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