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Arrival and Departure Times at Ports

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I feel like this is probably a dumb question, so I apologize in advance.  🙂

 

First time cruiser.  We’re going on a cruise to Alaska next month on the Norwegian Jewel and I’m trying to figure out what we want to do at each port. 

 

The itinerary says, for example, arrive in Juneau at 11 a.m. and depart Juneau at 9 p.m.  There is a note next to the itinerary that says “Due to security reasons, all guests must be on board 2 hours before sailing.  Disembarkation usually begins 2 hours after docking.  Itineraries are subject to change at any time without notice.” 

 

The extra 2 hours in the note is confusing me.  Like, does this mean that I should expect to not even get off the boat until at least 1 p.m. and that I have to be back on the boat by 7 p.m.?  I’m confused because I see shore excursions available through NCL starting at 11:30 a.m., which is obviously only 30 minutes after “arrival” time, so with the added 2 hours it doesn’t seem like you could make that, but then why would they offer it if you can’t make it?  Or does the 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. indicate what time you can expect to start getting off the boat and what time you have to be back on the boat?  

 

Thanks so much!

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The "2 hours" rule is only for the port you first board at. All other ports all aboard will typically be 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure. When you arrive at a port visit, the ship will clear and people will be getting off well within 30 minutes.

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 Be forewarned that IF the JOY is in Icy Point Strait the same day as you, the JEWEL will have to tender to the dock (using the lifeboats) its a quick ride ... about 10 minutes.   You will need to plan any excursion times factoring in the lines to get onto the tender and then the walk to the tour meeting place. 

 

We did Hoonah Whale Tours there  https://www.hoonahwhaletours.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsJD3_Y-44wIVhYbACh0yBAmCEAAYAiAAEgIvvfD_BwE

and had an absolutely glorious time.  We did the 1:30 pm tour and we saw lots of whale behavior.  They only allow 6 passengers on the boat so there is no one cramming in front of you to get pictures.

IMG_0201.JPG

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Of course we are helpful. Welcome to Cruise Critic.

 

Jim

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On 7/15/2019 at 7:24 PM, CruiserBruce said:

The "2 hours" rule is only for the port you first board at. All other ports all aboard will typically be 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure. When you arrive at a port visit, the ship will clear and people will be getting off well within 30 minutes.

 

Yes, frequently  a mis-conception brought about by cruiselines' untidy phraseology. :classic_rolleyes:

As per Bruce's post, the 2 hours is only for embarking at the start of your cruise.

 

At ports-of-call the latest back-on-board time is usually  30 minutes before the advertised sailing time if the ship is tied-up on the quay.

But at tendered ports (where  the ship is moored off-shore & passengers are ferried ashore by boats) the "last tender time" is usually 60 minutes before the advertised sailing time. "Last tender time" is the time you need to be back at the tender jetty, not the time you have to be on the ship - so you don't have to allow for the time taken by the ferrying.

At most ports your ship ties up on the quay. If the ship moors off-shore, against those ports the cruise itineraries usually say "ashore by tender" or similar.

It will take longer to go ashore by tender - not just the time taken by the tender boat but early in the day there will be more demand than boats available so there'll be a line - different ships have different ways of dealing with this. 

Sorry, I don't know NCL's routine for prioritising tenders - post here if you have any ports noted as "tender ports", & some kind soul will explain.

 

Those are rules-of-thumb - but do check your "latest back-on-board" or "last tender" times before you go ashore - it'll be in the ship's daily news-sheet and posted at the gangway.

 

JB :classic_smile:

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And ALWAYS make sure your WATCH is set to the same time as the ship's clocks...and there are clocks at EVERY exit!  Don't rely on your cell phone, as it will be showing LOCAL time, which may not be the same as SHIP'S time!

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If NCL is offering the shore excursion at that time, go ahead and book it if you want it.  If the ship is late, they'll bump the excursion back to when you can make it.  Also, pay attention to your Freestyle Daily (ship newsletter) and the signs as you leave the ship.  They'll tell you what time you have to be aboard.  That's the time you go by.  As a previous poster has mentioned, make sure your watch is set to ship time, so you won't be late.  Personally, I like to find a spot on the ship where I can watch all of the stragglers run for the ship when it's time to board.  🙂

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