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RocHed11

Leonid Meteor shower

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Hey All, going on a cruise from LA to Hawaii in and back in November and on the night before we get to Ensenada is the peak of the Leonid meteor shower.  I realize it is all dependent on the marine and cloud cover but If by chance it is clear, are there dark areas on deck to watch this? Thank for answers in advance.

T

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33 minutes ago, RocHed11 said:

Hey All, going on a cruise from LA to Hawaii in and back in November and on the night before we get to Ensenada is the peak of the Leonid meteor shower.  I realize it is all dependent on the marine and cloud cover but If by chance it is clear, are there dark areas on deck to watch this? Thank for answers in advance.

T

Typically, there's really not much in the way of a truly dark area.  The ships have lights in the outside areas.  Some not as bright as others, but still a light at night can wash things out.

 

Now, it may be possible, if you talk to the cruise director, that something can be arranged.  I know they do star gazing onboard, where they will turn the lights off in a specified area for a short time for people to do that as a group activity.

 

 

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Thank You Shmoo for that valuable Info!! Much appreciated!!

 

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We were on the CB on a west bound TA several years ago.  We were told to go up to the sports deck (17) aft to see the northern lights.  It was not totally dark due to the ship lights but we could see the lights.  This was about 2:00 AM in the northern Atlantic.  Another alternative might be the lido deck forward on top of the ship's bridge.  

 

We will be on the Star coming back from Hawaii and we may see you on the ship.  It would be nice if they were to shut off some lights to make it darker.  

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I actually just read a post on reddit that talked about star gazing from a balcony. The poster sounds like they were very well prepared for taking a photo in this environment. The photo they captured was gorgeous and impressive. 

 

Check it out to see the setup they used. 

https://www.reddit.com/r/Cruise/comments/cknktn/my_photo_of_the_milky_way_core_from_the_harmony/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x

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Anywhere forward of the bridge will be best as they do not like lights affecting there vision ahead. If getting forward is not an option,  I found the best views for the northern lights was off our balcony rather than the top deck.

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Posted (edited)
On 8/2/2019 at 1:36 PM, dearinger said:

I actually just read a post on reddit that talked about star gazing from a balcony. The poster sounds like they were very well prepared for taking a photo in this environment. The photo they captured was gorgeous and impressive. 

 

Check it out to see the setup they used. 

https://www.reddit.com/r/Cruise/comments/cknktn/my_photo_of_the_milky_way_core_from_the_harmony/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x

I have participated in multiple star-gazing sessions on Princess ships and while a lot more stars were visible than from one's backyard, but never saw something like this.  I find it hard to believe that the fellow who took this shot could have had such clarity at night on a moving ship (how much good does a tripod do on a moving ship??).  Plus, the Leonid Meteor Show doesn't peak until 11/17/2019 this year and it doesn't look this photo (see www.bashewa.com/wxmeteor-showers.php?shower=Leonids).  Finally, IMHO this photo looks more like a nebula than a meteor shower.

Edited by BarbinMich

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Most ships do not have any areas forward of the bridge that are open to the public, but perhaps something can be worked out for a special viewing area temporarily.  Since these areas are not lighted, and often are full of trip hazards, it might be tricky.

 

Otherwise you can sometimes find a spot that is not well-lighted and would make it easier.  The problem is that the best way to see meteor showers, in my limited experience, is somewhere where you can sit back and just watch the sky.  The meteors are not all that constant even at the peak.

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I've hardly seen any stars from a balcony, even though I always step outside before retiring, there's too much light blurring the view.  

 

For a meteor shower, I might attempt laying on a lounger or a towel up on the highest deck I could reach and gazing skyward.

 

The suggestion about asking guest services about setting up a light free zone for star gazing is a good one.  I would bring an article referencing the meteor shower for credibility. And remember, meteors may be visible in your home town, but not where your cruise ship takes you to.......

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On 8/3/2019 at 2:42 PM, BarbinMich said:

I have participated in multiple star-gazing sessions on Princess ships and while a lot more stars were visible than from one's backyard, but never saw something like this.  I find it hard to believe that the fellow who took this shot could have had such clarity at night on a moving ship (how much good does a tripod do on a moving ship??).  Plus, the Leonid Meteor Show doesn't peak until 11/17/2019 this year and it doesn't look this photo (see www.bashewa.com/wxmeteor-showers.php?shower=Leonids).  Finally, IMHO this photo looks more like a nebula than a meteor shower.

 

If you read the description of the photo, they never claim it is over a meteor shower. 

 

They stacked multiple four second exposures to generate that image (normally you'd use much longer exposures, but the motion of the ship and the lack of a mount that counters the Earth's rotation prevents that).  Using a relatively short focal length also helps limit the impact of ship motion.  Still, they note more than half of the images needed to be tossed due to blur.  Despite that, you can see several slightly elongated stars.  They also used several astrophotography tools to refine the image.

 

The camera collected over two minutes of light to produce that image, something your eyes can't do.  That's why you'd never see this view from the ship.  

 

It is an impressive result given the challenges, but not impossible for someone who knows what they are doing.

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