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Passport "confiscation"

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1 hour ago, cruisemom42 said:

In 2011 alone, the US State Department reported that their records showed 253,037 lost passports and 60,984 stolen worldwide. While that is a proverbial drop in the bucket of the total number of passport holders, one should keep in mind that not all of those travel in any given year. I think the article from which I got this number indicated it is about 2-3% of passport holders in total. So maybe as much as 5% of those who traveled in that given year are losing passports or having them stolen.

 

I'm not sure the number of those who need their passport and don't have it with them (and can't satisfy the need in some other way, such as producing a copy) would rise to that level...

 

 


Not to mention the dopes like me who forget it is in their pocket and send it through the laundry--fortunately I was home at the time.

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Posted (edited)

We have had our passports taken for administrative purposes, in past travels some countries have stamped a loose piece of paper rather than our passport.  It is all part of the travel regime.  You simply have to expect it if you are going on certain tours or going into certain counties.  

 

Heck, we when traveled by land from Cambodia to Vietnam they took all of our passports.  As we passed through, the customs agent handed me the passports from everyone on our minibus (all strangers, not a tour) to hand back to each person.  

 

No reason to get exited.  Go with flow and do not sweat the small stuff.    It is not as if you are giving up your citizenship.! Otherwise stay home or limit  your travels to specific modes and countries.  Really, you can loose your passport on the way to the airport in your home town.  It is that easy.

Edited by iancal

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8 hours ago, SRF said:

My office travels a LOT.  In the almost 20 years I have been working there, NOT ONE case of lost or stolen passport, or money.  And only one case of lost (not delayed) luggage.  Maybe we are just smarter than the average traveler. 😄

 

But then again, I watch the idiot tourists around Washington DC with NO awareness of any personal security.  Open purses slung behind them.  Everyone looking at their phone.  Circled around a map with purses and backpacks open and outside the circle.

 

I've worked in high-travel positions, still do moderate international business travel and the above corresponds with my experience.  In fairness however it doesn't make us smarter just more experienced and confident of being able to manage the vagaries of traveling.  It also makes us more aware of the potential for disruptions, builds a greater sense of self-reliance and a instills skepticism about soothing reassurances offered by anyone. 

 

We shouldn't be too hard on those travelers for whom the appeal of cruising and organized land tours is having most things done for them including all of the planning and much of the thinking.  Once they step off the ship however they are in a foreign country and on their own.  If they are like the tourists you see in Washington and I see in Toronto perhaps it is better they leave their passports on the ship.  The odds are in their favor they will return without an incident but if not they may be in for a very hard lesson.    

 

 

 

 

 

  

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18 hours ago, K32682 said:

 

I've worked in high-travel positions, still do moderate international business travel and the above corresponds with my experience.  In fairness however it doesn't make us smarter just more experienced and confident of being able to manage the vagaries of traveling.  It also makes us more aware of the potential for disruptions, builds a greater sense of self-reliance and a instills skepticism about soothing reassurances offered by anyone. 

 

We shouldn't be too hard on those travelers for whom the appeal of cruising and organized land tours is having most things done for them including all of the planning and much of the thinking.  Once they step off the ship however they are in a foreign country and on their own.  If they are like the tourists you see in Washington and I see in Toronto perhaps it is better they leave their passports on the ship.  The odds are in their favor they will return without an incident but if not they may be in for a very hard lesson.     

 

Thank you.

 

It does seem that many people check their brains when they go on vacation.

 

 

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On 8/10/2019 at 2:14 AM, K32682 said:


The posters who are dictating are the ones insisting he not take his passport with him. 

 

I see no posts on this thread which "dictate" that folk leave their passports on the ship, or indeed any that dictate that folk should take them ashore.

Perhaps you can direct me to a post that has "dictated", because all that I see is folk saying why they choose the one or the other. 

 

There are pros & cons for either choice - as Chipmaster so succinctly put it "it depends which Murphy you believe will meet you".

And you too have appreciated this - "Travelers can make their own decisions.  There are two sides to the story...............".

But you spoil that sentiment by continuing with "...............not just view from those who prefer to rely only on their cruise card while in a foreign country and have unwavering confidence in cruise ship employees",  which displays an arrogance that those of us who choose to leave our passports on the ship are somehow mindless inexperienced sheep. How very very wrong you are :classic_rolleyes:

     

 

20 hours ago, K32682 said:

 

I've worked in high-travel positions, still do moderate international business travel and the above corresponds with my experience.  In fairness however it doesn't make us smarter just more experienced and confident of being able to manage the vagaries of traveling.  It also makes us more aware of the potential for disruptions, builds a greater sense of self-reliance and a instills skepticism about soothing reassurances offered by anyone. 

 

We shouldn't be too hard on those travelers for whom the appeal of cruising and organized land tours is having most things done for them including all of the planning and much of the thinking.  Once they step off the ship however they are in a foreign country and on their own.  If they are like the tourists you see in Washington and I see in Toronto perhaps it is better they leave their passports on the ship.  The odds are in their favor they will return without an incident but if not they may be in for a very hard lesson.    

 

 

Whilst I agree with much of your post, you continue with the same theme. "Soothing reassurances offered by anyone" seems to imply that those of us who choose to leave our passports on the ship are inexperienced .

Just check the travel history of the likes of the Flyer, Sloopsailor, Cruisemom, SantaFe Fan, Itchy&Scratchy,  Chipmaster. Trust me, they're no novices. And cruising is far from the only travel that yours-truly has done  - multiple road trips in most countries in Europe, the US, Canada, South Africa, Aus, New Zealand. Safaris. DIY city breaks. Yachting. Even hitch-hiking when I was a lot younger.

 

So you really need to acknowledge that the opinions of the majority, who prefer the Murphy's Law of passport on ship rather than the Murphy's Law of passport on person, are at least as valid as yours. 

 

JB :classic_smile:

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1 hour ago, John Bull said:

 

I see no posts on this thread which "dictate" that folk leave their passports on the ship, or indeed any that dictate that folk should take them ashore.

Perhaps you can direct me to a post that has "dictated", because all that I see is folk saying why they choose the one or the other. 

 

There are pros & cons for either choice - as Chipmaster so succinctly put it "it depends which Murphy you believe will meet you".

And you too have appreciated this - "Travelers can make their own decisions.  There are two sides to the story...............".

But you spoil that sentiment by continuing with "...............not just view from those who prefer to rely only on their cruise card while in a foreign country and have unwavering confidence in cruise ship employees",  which displays an arrogance that those of us who choose to leave our passports on the ship are somehow mindless inexperienced sheep. How very very wrong you are :classic_rolleyes:

     

Whilst I agree with much of your post, you continue with the same theme. "Soothing reassurances offered by anyone" seems to imply that those of us who choose to leave our passports on the ship are inexperienced .

Just check the travel history of the likes of the Flyer, Sloopsailor, Cruisemom, SantaFe Fan, Itchy&Scratchy,  Chipmaster. Trust me, they're no novices. And cruising is far from the only travel that yours-truly has done  - multiple road trips in most countries in Europe, the US, Canada, South Africa, Aus, New Zealand. Safaris. DIY city breaks. Yachting. Even hitch-hiking when I was a lot younger.

 

So you really need to acknowledge that the opinions of the majority, who prefer the Murphy's Law of passport on ship rather than the Murphy's Law of passport on person, are at least as valid as yours. 

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

I would suggest you read the posts in this thread from Heidi13, a former cruise line captain, to ascertain the full facts regarding the obligations of the cruise company, the priority they put on rummaging around your cabin to retrieve your passport if you miss the ship and reality of the "soothing reassurances." 

 

 

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On 8/9/2019 at 11:38 AM, K32682 said:

 

Places where my passport was required include visiting a game preserve in Africa, going to a casino in Bulgaria, exchanging money in France, renting a car in Romania, the UK and various other countries.  Are these habits to reconsider?  Additionally, there were police checkpoints in Angola, Spain and Armenia where the passport came in handy.  Perhaps people for whom the sum total of their international experience is cruising, bus tours and other tightly-organized travel modes might see matters differently. 

 

The cruise ship officers do say they will transfer your passport to the port agent but there are no guarantees.  Even if they do you have to get back to the port and find the agent to retrieve your passport a task that could be quite difficult in the middle of the night and/or you are injured.  Far simpler is securely carrying your passport with you at all times.   

 

Travelers can make their own decisions.  There are two sides to the story not just view from those who prefer to rely only on their cruise card while in a foreign country and have unwavering confidence in cruise ship employees.   

As aforementioned, cruise lines that take your passport (BTW, pretty much every premium/luxury line), provide them to you for port visits where required for BP, car rental, etc.

And the choice for cruisers isn't just the cruise card vs passport. We use the US passport card for ID ashore. With the exception of international air travel (or published government requirements otherwise), it covers all other bases for "gov't ID" anywhere.

 

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1 hour ago, K32682 said:

 

I would suggest you read the posts in this thread from Heidi13, a former cruise line captain, to ascertain the full facts regarding the obligations of the cruise company, the priority they put on rummaging around your cabin to retrieve your passport if you miss the ship and reality of the "soothing reassurances." 

 

 

This is a subject matter akin to tipping, where both sides are entrenched. Personally, I have no desire to discuss what we do, as it works for us, but not necessarily for others.

 

In my previous posts, I don't believe I provided full facts, as I did not discuss probability. I only responded to a statement that the ship "will" land passports, responding with the ship will "endeavour" to land passports, then upon request, provided examples of potential priorities that could preclude landing passports.

 

While I don't have any actual statistics, I suggest reviewing based on a risk assessment. To ascertain the full facts, you must consider the probability. In most ports, while a number of reasons can preclude taking time to search for passports,  the probability is low. Therefore, in most cases the ship will at least attempt ("endeavour") a cursory search to locate passports and if found, land them ashore.

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50 minutes ago, Heidi13 said:

While I don't have any actual statistics, I suggest reviewing based on a risk assessment. To ascertain the full facts, you must consider the probability. In most ports, while a number of reasons can preclude taking time to search for passports,  the probability is low. Therefore, in most cases the ship will at least attempt ("endeavour") a cursory search to locate passports and if found, land them ashore.

 

Thank you; I was hoping you would circle back and clarify a bit as your previous post came across rather more iffy about the process than I have encountered in many conversations with officers aboard various ships and various lines.

 

Unfortunately there are some who require absolute 100% certainty, and for them this statement will in no way mitigate their feeling about the process. For others, who live in a real but imperfect world, considering the probability and making one's decision based on their assessment seems the wisest course.

 

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2 hours ago, K32682 said:

 

I would suggest you read the posts in this thread from Heidi13, a former cruise line captain, to ascertain the full facts regarding the obligations of the cruise company, the priority they put on rummaging around your cabin to retrieve your passport if you miss the ship and reality of the "soothing reassurances." 

 

Indeed I did - Heidi's post was responding to a poster who said that "the ship will" rather than "the ship probably will", and has since clarified that the possibility of a missing passenger's passport not being handed to the port agent is low.

And to that low risk add the low risk of not getting back to the ship in the first place.
Thus I don't need anyone to give me any "soothing reassurances". :classic_rolleyes:

 

We leave our passports in the cabin safe, the first - and possibly the only  - place the crew will look.

We base our choice on the risks of our passports getting lost or stolen or damaged ashore being greater than the risk of being left behind without our passports.

That said, the risk in either case is low.

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, John Bull said:

Indeed I did - Heidi's post was responding to a poster who said that "the ship will" rather than "the ship probably will", and has since clarified that the possibility of a missing passenger's passport not being handed to the port agent is low.

And to that low risk add the low risk of not getting back to the ship in the first place.
Thus I don't need anyone to give me any "soothing reassurances". :classic_rolleyes:

 

We leave our passports in the cabin safe, the first - and possibly the only  - place the crew will look.

We base our choice on the risks of our passports getting lost or stolen or damaged ashore being greater than the risk of being left behind without our passports.

That said, the risk in either case is low.

 

Combined with the "low risk" of your passport not being there is you having to locate the port agent and retrieve it. So IF the ship's crew does deliver the passport and IF you can locate the port agent and IF you can arrange to meet him/her you can get your passport.  

 

My risk of losing my passport is very low and I don't have to hope that the ship's crew and port agent live up to their claims they will get my passport back to me.  If I miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need my passport while ashore I will have it.  If you miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need your passport while ashore you might get it eventually, maybe.    

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4 minutes ago, K32682 said:

My risk of losing my passport is very low and I don't have to hope that the ship's crew and port agent live up to their claims they will get my passport back to me.  If I miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need my passport while ashore I will have it.  If you miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need your passport while ashore you might get it eventually, maybe.    

 

While the risk of missing the ship or having an accident ashore may be low, the consequences of losing a passport are not, at least not for American citizens (and probably most other countries too) whose replacement passports can only be issued by an Embassy or Consulate.  Even if you are 'lucky' enough to have one in the city you are visiting it is no guarantee that you will make the ship.  The US, for example has greatly reduced the number of consulates world wide over the last few decades.  In the 1980s (when my DH was stationed at US Embassy Rome) the US had full service consulates in Rome (co-located with the Embassy), Milan, Florence, Venice, Naples, Palermo and Genoa (IIRC).  Now the number of full consulates offering replacement passports have been reduced.  Genoa has only a consular agent ("Citizens with lost or stolen passports must report to US Consulate General, Milan for a temporary replacement passport."), as does Palermo (" Citizens with lost or stolen passports must go in person to apply for a same-day emergency passport at one of the following Consulates in Italy: Milan, Florence, Rome or Naples."), and Venice (" Citizens with lost or stolen passports must go in person to apply for a same-day emergency passport at one of the following Consulates in Italy: Milan, Florence, Rome or Naples.").  Other countries with US Consulates have experienced a similar reduction in services. 

 

The State Department's website even warns of the possible delays (where you are responsible for covering any expenses) in obtaining a new passport:

 

"Most U.S. embassies and consulates cannot issue passports on weekends or holidays when the embassy/consulate is closed. All U.S. embassies and consulates have after-hours duty officers available to assist with life or death emergencies of U.S. citizens abroad. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate after-hours duty officer for assistance if you have an emergency need to travel or have been the victim of a serious crime.

Duty officers must focus primary attention on life or death emergencies. In most cases, except for serious emergencies, a replacement passport will not be issued until the next business day."

 

Maybe Great Britain has an easier, quicker replacement process but I would not want to go through all the hassle and expense required to replace a lost or stolen US passport (especially on a weekend!).

 

 

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2 hours ago, K32682 said:

 

Combined with the "low risk" of your passport not being there is you having to locate the port agent and retrieve it. So IF the ship's crew does deliver the passport and IF you can locate the port agent and IF you can arrange to meet him/her you can get your passport.  

 

My risk of losing my passport is very low and I don't have to hope that the ship's crew and port agent live up to their claims they will get my passport back to me.  If I miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need my passport while ashore I will have it.  If you miss the boat, have an accident, etc. and need your passport while ashore you might get it eventually, maybe.    

 

 

You don't give up. do you :classic_biggrin:

There's no "if" or "hope" about locating the ship's shore agent -  we carry his contact details, which are always on the ship's news-sheet. 

So it's if we miss the sailing and if the crew haven't handed our passports to the port agent. That's a tiny risk that we're prepared to take in order to ensure that at the end of our cruise our passports are in our cabin safe along with our air tickets, ready to present at the airport for our flight home.

 

Capriccio -  it's my understanding, not from personal experience, that getting a replacement for a lost or stolen UK passport is just as fraught & time-consuming as it for a US one. 

And Murphy's Law of course says yes, it's bound to happen at a weekend. :classic_wink:

 

JB :classic_smile:

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1 hour ago, John Bull said:

You don't give up. do you :classic_biggrin:

There's no "if" or "hope" about locating the ship's shore agent -  we carry his contact details, which are always on the ship's news-sheet. 

So it's if we miss the sailing and if the crew haven't handed our passports to the port agent. That's a tiny risk that we're prepared to take in order to ensure that at the end of our cruise our passports are in our cabin safe along with our air tickets, ready to present at the airport for our flight home.

 

The contact details are of little value if he/she does not answer the phone, is unavailable or you can't get to where he or she is.  The obligations of the port agent to return your passport is far from ironclad.

 

You can either have confidence in yourself to manage your documents or put your trust in complete strangers who likely will get your passport from your cabin to the port agent.  Maybe. Perhaps. Hope so.  

 

I have more faith in myself.  YMMV. 

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Over fifty years of extensive International travel and more then forty years of cruising (all over the world) puts me solidly in John Bull's camp.   Come to think of it, between JB and me we might be talking about nearly 100 years of travel experience (let JB deal with that comment :).   But this topic is simply a matter of personal preference and I do not think there is any right or wrong.  Like many independent travelers we have learned to rely on experience and common sense as we explore the world (on and off ships).  When I am ashore (or just on land trips) and decide to go swimming in the ocean, snorkeling or even SCUBA diving, I sure do not want to be concerned about where I should leave my Passport.  Even folks who carry their Passports around the Caribbean (cannot understand why on earth anyone would do that) might have to deal with what to do with their Passports when they decide to climb Dunns River Falls.  And by the way, talk to just about anyone who gets mugged or robbed and they will say, "this never happened to me before."  Most tourists/cruisers are ripe targets for folks that make their living by taking things that do not belong to them, and cruisers are among the easiest (and obvious) targets.  Watching a cruiser strut down a street with their fanny pack (bum pack for John Bull), bottle of water,  cruise card or medallion swinging from a chain around their neck, clothes that do not fit into the norm, etc. can sometimes be comical.  We live part of the year in a cruise port and DW can sit on our balcony and pick out cruisers (from non-cruisers) by what they wear and carry.   Thieves are also watching and they know that cruisers are the ones most likely to be carrying more cash, Passports, expensive phones, etc.  To them, a cruiser is simply an easy pay day.  Where we live in the winter (a cruise port) the local taxi drivers are quick to overcharge cruisers as are some of the shops!  And this is not unusual in many parts of the world.

 

Even in our old age we manage to spend about 6 months a year out of our home country.  Our Passports remain securely locked in cabin or hotel safes unless we have a compelling reason to carry them on our person.  And yes, there are certain times (and countries) where this is a necessity.  But that is a minority of countries and ports that we visit.  

 

Let me speak to another issue referred to my friend, John Bull.  All cruisers should carry the information regarding the port agent.  This is always made available to cruisers and is generally found in the daily schedule or a separate handout with port information.  If there is an emergency ashore, or some kind of delay, having that port agent info is very helpful.  I also wish that all cruise ships would provide a direct phone number so passengers can call (or text) the ship if necessary.  We were recently on an upscale line that did provide such info...but most mass market lines refuse.  

 

Hank

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1 hour ago, Hlitner said:

Let me speak to another issue referred to my friend, John Bull.  All cruisers should carry the information regarding the port agent. 

 

Hank

 

No, Hank, there's no point in doing that.

As my learned friend K32682 has pointed out, he may not answer his phone or you might not be able to get to where he is.

Or he might have drowned in a cask of Guinness,  or been abducted by aliens :classic_wink:

 

JB :classic_smile:

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2 hours ago, K32682 said:

 

The contact details are of little value if he/she does not answer the phone, is unavailable or you can't get to where he or she is.  The obligations of the port agent to return your passport is far from ironclad.

 

You can either have confidence in yourself to manage your documents or put your trust in complete strangers who likely will get your passport from your cabin to the port agent.  Maybe. Perhaps. Hope so.  

 

I have more faith in myself.  YMMV. 

 

hu·bris
/ˈ(h)yo͞obrəs/
noun
 
  1. excessive pride or self-confidence. Often said to go before a fall.

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11 minutes ago, John Bull said:

 

No, Hank, there's no point in doing that.

As my learned friend K32682 has pointed out, he may not answer his phone or you might not be able to get to where he is.

Or he might have drowned in a cask of Guinness,  or been abducted by aliens :classic_wink:

 

JB :classic_smile:

Drowned in a cask of Guinness?  Hmmm.  Perhaps I should listen to K32682 :).  What a way to go.

 

Hank

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, John Bull said:

 

No, Hank, there's no point in doing that.

As my learned friend K32682 has pointed out, he may not answer his phone or you might not be able to get to where he is.

Or he might have drowned in a cask of Guinness,  or been abducted by aliens :classic_wink:

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

Or if the port agent is an acquaintance of K32682, he will ignore them because according to your learned friend they should have been self sufficient and they deserve all the discomfort they caused themselves, the fools. Give no quarter would be the code of the day.  

Edited by SantaFeFan

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4 minutes ago, Hlitner said:

Drowned in a cask of Guinness?  Hmmm.  Perhaps I should listen to K32682 :).  What a way to go.

 

Hank

 

I though you'd enjoy the reference to the evil black brew, Hank

Yes, I'm sure that's the way you'd like to go on judgement day :classic_wink:

 

For myself I'd want to die in my sleep - just like my old grandpa did.

I wouldn't want to die in terror - like the passengers on the bus that he was driving at the time  :classic_biggrin:

 

JB :classic_smile:

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Port agents can, and do,  do pretty amazing things in carrying out their duties, even in s....hole countries that send us their worse. An acquaintance was injured in a traffic accident and hospitalized. The police notified the port agent(s) who then contacted each of the several ships in port and determined which ship she was on.

 

Her passport was delivered to her at the hospital and her traveling companions were notified. The one that decided to remain with her was provided with assistance obtaining land based accommodations and air transport back to the States days later. I don't really know who provided  the assistance, but it was someone local, so likely through the port agent. 

 

Things did end well after a serious injury and significant expense. And the expenses were totally reimbursed by the trip insurance. But that's a tale for another thread. 

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17 hours ago, Heidi13 said:

This is a subject matter akin to tipping, where both sides are entrenched. Personally, I have no desire to discuss what we do, as it works for us, but not necessarily for others.

 

In my previous posts, I don't believe I provided full facts, as I did not discuss probability. I only responded to a statement that the ship "will" land passports, responding with the ship will "endeavour" to land passports, then upon request, provided examples of potential priorities that could preclude landing passports.

 

While I don't have any actual statistics, I suggest reviewing based on a risk assessment. To ascertain the full facts, you must consider the probability. In most ports, while a number of reasons can preclude taking time to search for passports,  the probability is low. Therefore, in most cases the ship will at least attempt ("endeavour") a cursory search to locate passports and if found, land them ashore.

 

My point has always been, MOST LIKELY they will "land" your passports, if left in the safe.  But that it is NOT guaranteed.

 

Which what it seems you are saying.

 

I take exception to those who say that they WILL "land" your passports.

 

Change that to WILL PROBABLY or MOST LIKELY WILL, and I will agree.

 

My preference is for people to have the real facts, then for them to make up their minds.   I do take exception to those who fear monger (your passport will be stolen or lost), then sooth with "they WILL land you passports." Especially when they claim those who say that they carry their passport to be fear mongering. 

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7 hours ago, CPT Trips said:

Port agents can, and do,  do pretty amazing things in carrying out their duties, even in s....hole countries that send us their worse. An acquaintance was injured in a traffic accident and hospitalized. The police notified the port agent(s) who then contacted each of the several ships in port and determined which ship she was on.

 

Her passport was delivered to her at the hospital and her traveling companions were notified. The one that decided to remain with her was provided with assistance obtaining land based accommodations and air transport back to the States days later. I don't really know who provided  the assistance, but it was someone local, so likely through the port agent. 

 

Things did end well after a serious injury and significant expense. And the expenses were totally reimbursed by the trip insurance. But that's a tale for another thread. 

 

It all depends on the port agent.  There have been stories about those that gave virtually no support, to stories like yours.

 

Bottom line, great if it happens, but don't expect it to be the norm.

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9 hours ago, Hlitner said:

Most tourists/cruisers are ripe targets for folks that make their living by taking things that do not belong to them, and cruisers are among the easiest (and obvious) targets.  Watching a cruiser strut down a street with their fanny pack (bum pack for John Bull), bottle of water,  cruise card or medallion swinging from a chain around their neck, clothes that do not fit into the norm, etc. can sometimes be comical.  We live part of the year in a cruise port and DW can sit on our balcony and pick out cruisers (from non-cruisers) by what they wear and carry.   Thieves are also watching and they know that cruisers are the ones most likely to be carrying more cash, Passports, expensive phones, etc.  To them, a cruiser is simply an easy pay day.  Where we live in the winter (a cruise port) the local taxi drivers are quick to overcharge cruisers as are some of the shops!  And this is not unusual in many parts of the world.

 

This is probably the most important point.

 

Don't show that you are carrying things worth stealing.

 

Don't make it easy for the thieves.

 

PAY ATTENTION.  

 

Do not put your brain on hold when you leave your home.

 

Let the other sheep be eaten by the wolf, while you enjoy your vacation.

 

My Mother was from Hawaii.  When visited there, we used to go down to Waikiki and watch the pickpockets work the tourists.  They were pitiful as pickpockets, but the tourists were oblivious.

 

BTW, there are waterproof pouches that are great for the beach and things you do not want to get wet. 😄

 

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5 hours ago, SRF said:

 

This is probably the most important point.

 

Don't show that you are carrying things worth stealing.

 

Don't make it easy for the thieves.

 

PAY ATTENTION.  

 

Do not put your brain on hold when you leave your home.

 

Let the other sheep be eaten by the wolf, while you enjoy your vacation.

 

My Mother was from Hawaii.  When visited there, we used to go down to Waikiki and watch the pickpockets work the tourists.  They were pitiful as pickpockets, but the tourists were oblivious.

 

BTW, there are waterproof pouches that are great for the beach and things you do not want to get wet. 😄

 

As an avid (lifelong) lover of being in the sea, we have several types of waterproof pouches, fanny packs, etc.  Most of the time these devices work exactly as advertised.  But over the years, every device I have has had their moments when they leaked (usually because of my own failure to properly close the darn things).  When I did have a leak it only meant some wet cash (easily dried) and wet credit cards.  I did not carry a phone or Passport.  But if I had either of those items they would have been ruined (a Passport that gets water damage must be replaced at the owners expense).  I do have a new waterproof pouch designed for my iPhone, but have yet to test it.  

 

We have posted the sad tale of two cruise mates that were on a Celebrity Silhouette cruise to parts of Europe and the Middle East (about 4 years ago).  When we were in Tel Aviv this couple decided to take a dip in the sea.  They left their stuff (in a back pack) on the beach after asking some nearby folks to keep an eye on the things.  When they returned a few minutes later the couple (watching their stuff) was gone and so was their stuff.  Unfortunately, their bag had both their Passports.  Fortunately our ship was spending another day in Israel (at another port) and those folks spent the entire day (and a lot of money) running all over the place to get new Passport photos and emergency replacements.  They were very lucky since it was a business day when the Consulate was open (they are closed on weekends and holidays).  The punch line to this tale is that the couple (who lost their Passports) were both NYC Police Detectives.   Not sure what was worse for them, having their Passports stolen or having to face their cruise mates at the bar :).

 

Hank

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