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Naismith

Chances of Indonesian Room Steward?

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I am writing this from Indonesia, where I have been living for over a year serving as a missionary for my church.  As a result, I can speak bahasa Indonesia effectively if not quite fluently.

 

I understand that HAL has a training center on a nearby island.  Indeed, although it is in a brick building it is called MS Nieuw Jakarta.  So I imagine a good proportion of workers are from Indonesia?

 

We are returning home to the U.S. next month and headed off on the Zuiderdam in November, so I am wondering, for that ship, what would be the odds of having an Indonesian room steward?  We are looking forward to keeping up the language skills, and it would be a delight to be able to speak the language again.

 

Terima kasih! (thank you)

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My experience and best guess would be 99% since the Room Steward school is located in Indonesia.

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The cabin stewards have an enormous amount of work to do during their shifts.  As much as you have good intentions, they really won't have the time to have an extended chat with you other than a pleasant "good morning" or "good evening."

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Naismith said:

 As a result, I can speak bahasa Indonesia effectively if not quite fluently. [...]

Terima kasih! (thank you)

@Naismith, congratulations on learning a new language!

Does Good Day =  Selamat siang ? 

 

@Crew News, how about on Alaska cruises? 

Edited by SempreMare

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HAL has mostly Indonesian crew in the hotel department. If alcohol is involved, Philippino crew handles that. (bar, wine steward) It doesn't matter where the ships sail. Our last HAL cruise was not completely sold out and the dining room crew had sometimes time for a chat.

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Other than introducing themselves on the first day, we rarely see our room stewards.  While we're out and about, they clean our cabin.  They're very efficient but overworked, sometimes with as many as 40 cabins to take care of; however, any time we run into a steward in the corridors, he always has a smile and a friendly hello.  HAL stewards are the best, IMO. 

 

I miss the days when they didn't have as many cabins assigned, so they could talk to us about home and their culture.  Sadly, that aspect on HAL ships has disappeared because they are too busy.  I would not want to infringe on their job performance by engaging them in an extended conversation.

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Apa Kabar, Naismith? 

 

In the Dining areas, you will find mostly Indonesian and now Thai and Philippino servers. There are more and more Indonesian officers in the Hotel Department, too.

 

Selamat Datung!

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All theFillipinos in the restaurants are "wind steward" but if you want another drink other wine, they will get for you. All dining room and room steward are Indonesian. They go into your room when you are away.  I see them all except my room Steward.

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Have a wonderful cruise home! I also believe you will have gracious stewards who are Indonesian. All of our years with HAL have been.

Denise😊

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The school ran by Joost de Raad is closed (big mistake), cost cutting by the boys in Seattle, but you will get Indonesians in your room and dining room and you will love them, they are the best..

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Thanks so much!  Indonesia has become our second home, so nice to know we will have a taste of that when we cruise HAL.

 

SempreMare, the day in Indonesia is divided differently from USAmerica.  They don't have noon, but rather a time of day around our noon...

 

So the greetings are as follows:

Selamat pagi - morning until 10:30 a.m.

Selamat siang (SEE-ang)- from 10:30 to maybe 2 p.m.

Selamat sore (so-ray) - from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Selamat malam (ma-lam) - after 6:30 p.m., because that's when it gets dark in Indonesia, year round because most of the islands are pretty much on the equator.  (But even on a cruise to Iceland where the sun doesn't set until after midnight, you could still use the evening greeting after 6:30 or so.)

 

Of course I don't intend to distract from the hard work they do (good reminder), but it would be a pleasure to just say those brief everyday things.  When we were on another cruise, one time we said "Selamat pagi!" to an Indonesian we noticed in the hall, and the entire hallway seemed to echo the response.  (Malaysians also use much of the same vocabulary.)

 

Also, if you happen to shake hands with someone when you meet them, which we often do with our room steward the first time, the custom here is to shake the hand and then briefly bring that hand to the heart.  

 

And this coming Saturday, August 17, is their Independence Day (74 years!) so if you are on a cruise then you can say, "Selamat Hari Kemerdekaan!" all day.  Oops, that's long.  Just say "Merdeka!" (mare-DAY-ka) and they will probably grin, raise a fist, and echo, "Merdeka!"  

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1 hour ago, Himself said:

All theFillipinos in the restaurants are "wind steward" but if you want another drink other wine, they will get for you. All dining room and room steward are Indonesian. They go into your room when you are away.  I see them all except my room Steward.

 

You are out of date.  HAL has brought in Philippinos and Thais for waiters in both the MDR and Lido this year.  When you speak Bahasa, you find out very quickly who's who.

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6 hours ago, SempreMare said:

 

@Crew News, how about on Alaska cruises? 

 

You can count on it. 

 

Most of my Room Stewards enjoyed chatting, especially if you ask about their families back home and about their next contract (ship).  On my Alaska cruise this year, my Room Steward wanted to see the photos that I had taken the previous day.  If you have a Room Steward with lots of HAL experience, you have almost a personal Concierge that can make things happen. 

 

When I embark on a new cruise, I ask my Room Steward if any of my previous Room Stewards (I keep a little notebook of memborable HAL crew) are on board and I have been successful several times experiencing a very friendly reunion. 

 

As most cruisers will attest, near the top their list of what they miss most about cruising is their Room Steward's attention.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Naismith said:

 

So the greetings are as follows:

Selamat pagi - morning until 10:30 a.m.

Selamat siang (SEE-ang)- from 10:30 to maybe 2 p.m.

Selamat sore (so-ray) - from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Selamat malam (ma-lam) - after 6:30 p.m., because that's when it gets dark in Indonesia, year round because most of the islands are pretty much on the equator.  (But even on a cruise to Iceland where the sun doesn't set until after midnight, you could still use the evening greeting after 6:30 or so.)

 

I spent my senior year of high school as an exchange student in Davao City, Philippines. It's interesting some of the language similarities. In Tagalog, there is a word similar to "selamat" - salamat..but it is part of "thank you" (Salamat po (sah-LAH-maht poe). Po is the more formal and appropriate for anyone who is not a close friend or relative. The general greetings throughout the day in Tagalog are:

Magandang umaga (mah-GAHNNN-dahng oo-MAH-gah) - Good morning (2nd syllable is emphasized but rests on the N not the ahh)

Magandang hapon (mah-GAHNNN-dahng hah-PONE)- Good afternoon

Magandang gabi (mah-GAHNNN-dahng gah-BEE) - Good evening

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Our room stewards seemed to always have the time to talk with us and we joked about how happy they were to be going home at the end of our trip while we wanted it to go on for longer. While most of the servers in the main dining room are Indonesian,  they are not the only nation represented.

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While we do appreciate the Indonesian cabin stewards on HAL, we also understand they have tremendous demands on their time and little time to socialize.  But DW and I also think the best stewards are the one's you seldom see or hear.  They somehow manage to clean and make-up the cabins while being almost invisible.  On our most recent Seabourn cruise (last week) our cabin Stewardess was amazing.  She (Seabourn uses female cabin stewards) introduced herself on embarkation day and ask a few questions (what time we eat, how did we want our bar stocked, etc)?  For the next 14 days we hardly saw our stewardess but our cabin was always cleaned while we were at breakfast and out for dinner.  She never knocked at our door during the entire cruise (except embarkation day) and our cabin was always spotless.  DW and I have concluded that the best cabin attendants are the one's you never see :).  Consider that if a steward or stewardess stops to chat and socialize it takes away from their time to complete their tasks or extends their own work day.

 

Hank

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15 hours ago, baggal said:

The cabin stewards have an enormous amount of work to do during their shifts.  As much as you have good intentions, they really won't have the time to have an extended chat with you other than a pleasant "good morning" or "good evening."

The cabin stewards are too polite to say that they have no time to chat. Talking to other guests is the reason my cabin doesn't get made up until afternoon.

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On 8/10/2019 at 6:13 AM, Krazy Kruizers said:

Same here.  We have only had Indonesian room stewards all the years we have sailed on HAL.

 

 

 

Ditto,  ditto,  ^ ^     Yes to that   .

 

 

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, Hlitner said:

While we do appreciate the Indonesian cabin stewards on HAL, we also understand they have tremendous demands on their time and little time to socialize.  But DW and I also think the best stewards are the one's you seldom see or hear.  They somehow manage to clean and make-up the cabins while being almost invisible.  On our most recent Seabourn cruise (last week) our cabin Stewardess was amazing.  She (Seabourn uses female cabin stewards) introduced herself on embarkation day and ask a few questions (what time we eat, how did we want our bar stocked, etc)?  For the next 14 days we hardly saw our stewardess but our cabin was always cleaned while we were at breakfast and out for dinner.  She never knocked at our door during the entire cruise (except embarkation day) and our cabin was always spotless.  DW and I have concluded that the best cabin attendants are the one's you never see :).  Consider that if a steward or stewardess stops to chat and socialize it takes away from their time to complete their tasks or extends their own work day.

 

Hank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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