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raindropsalways

Proof as to why non-disabled are booking cabins for disabled

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Just discovered proof of one of our major problems regarding the availability of accessible cabins. Problem is with non disabled using HC cabins as most of us already know. This is one of the major problems as to why.

 

A TA (The Travel Tutor) is promoting the use of scooters for non-disabled people. Yes, I would agree that a scooter would make life easier for those individuals, however they have a choice. We, the disabled to not have options.

 

I do not know how the rest of you feel about the issue, but I'm tempted to write to all the cruise lines and request they stop allowing him to book accessible cabins unless he can provide proof they are disabled.   Here is the link to his advertisement promoting the use of non disabled using scooters on shps.

 

https://themighty.com/2018/06/mobility-scooter-cruise-ship/

 

Please share your opinions with me and if you disagree, please be gentle.

 

Thanks,

Betty

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, raindropsalways said:

Just discovered proof of one of our major problems regarding the availability of accessible cabins. Problem is with non disabled using HC cabins as most of us already know. This is one of the major problems as to why.

 

A TA (The Travel Tutor) is promoting the use of scooters for non-disabled people. Yes, I would agree that a scooter would make life easier for those individuals, however they have a choice. We, the disabled to not have options.

 

I do not know how the rest of you feel about the issue, but I'm tempted to write to all the cruise lines and request they stop allowing him to book accessible cabins unless he can provide proof they are disabled.   Here is the link to his advertisement promoting the use of non disabled using scooters on shps.

 

https://themighty.com/2018/06/mobility-scooter-cruise-ship/

 

Please share your opinions with me and if you disagree, please be gentle.

 

Thanks,

Betty

So what, big deal. They say if it helps you and will make your cruise more enjoyable, then rent one. He doesn't say you have to have an accessable cabin for it. Only that you would need one for a large scooter,

Edited by cruisinfanatic

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I don't see what's wrong with the article...

 

He starts off with "Have you put the brakes on taking a cruise because you use a mobility scooter at home and don’t think you can take it on board? Or maybe you think you can’t do all the walking and standing that today’s mega-ships require? "

 

He's clearly talking "to" people who have some kind of mobility issues - they just don't see themselves as disabled - just those who need a bit of help (like using a mobility scooter in the big grocery store, or who use a scooter at home and are thinking they can't take it on the ship. I don't see him saying - "Hey, everyone should get a scooter for on the ship".

 

I equate it to when I took my adult parents to Disney World. While my mother wasn't disabled back then (it was before her stroke), she has a bad knee from a car accident, was overweight and had bronchitis the week before we went. Frankly, all of that walking was killing her. She still had reduced lung capacity and her leg/knee were swelling really badly (and she had to cover it in ice for hours each night). After 2 days in the parks, my dad and I gently broached the subject of getting a wheelchair for her. We could see that she was really struggling and would benefit from not having to exert herself so much. She didn't use a wheelchair full time but there was no reason not to in this case where she was just not able enough to handle the trip. 

 

When we first started cruising I did a lot of research to figure out if the ships and cabins could accommodate my mother's needs (she had a stroke and has lost the use of her right side). Articles like this can be helpful someone hesitant to book a cruise because they don't think they can.

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? I do not see anything wrong with the article listed.   He’s simply stating a fact, not imho advising everyone to go rent a scooter.   Yup, DH on oxygen still walks on the ship as well as some ports, but hey, I can see the day where we rent a scooter for him to make life easier, but he is a slight man, a small Travelscoot will be fine, and no Handicapped room to start with for us...we like our suites too much!!!   

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That TA does suggest that they should book standard cabins, but no where does he suggest that the handicapped may not have the option or ability to use a standard cabin.

 

In reading through his reasoning, I certainly do not have any objections to those who benefit from the scooters cruising. However, no where does he indicate that they should not book HC or accessible cabins. He actually tells one group that they would have to. He also elaborates on the additional space in the HC cabins. What do you think those people are going to book?

 

I certainly have respect for those that use the mobility scooters to make life easier. Regardless, they may have an option. Those of us that are handicapped do no have that option. Yes, I'm one that can walk; the legs work. It is just that my lungs cannot tolerate the exertion and breathing happens to be a necessity for all. Even though I do not use oxygen full time, it is a serious requirement, thus I limit my physical activities. Also, I have been determined to be handicapped by both state and military veterans standards.

 

This takes us right back to the reason the US cruise lines cannot verify the need for an HC cabin. If we would follow the European lead, there would not be any problems and the cruise lines could verify the need, thus prevent able bodied people from booking the accessible cabins. All it would take would be the HC placard. I do not know what the other states provide, however, mine has a number and the expiration date and can be traced right back to me even though my name is not on it. Ruth was from California and her placard also had info that could be traced back to her. We got our passes to use Miami's accessible transportation by providing them our local info. Also, there is nothing personal on the placards, thus no private info is released to anyone.

 

I remember one of my first cruises after Ruth passed away. The number of scooters parked at the edge of the dining room made it look like a mobility convention. Due to the extensive number of scooters, I believe many were in standard cabins. I fully support those that can benefit by the use of a scooter even though it may not be a necessity. However if they are depriving someone that does not have any options, they are wrong. So if you have a parent or family member that really needs mobility device, take that person to the doctor and get the damn placard. Yes, I know most of us do not want to admit there is anything wrong, my son jumped for joy when I finally got my HC placard, but the granddaughters still did not know.

 

Personally, I would support that TA if he, in any way put emphasis on not booking the HC cabins unless they are actually HC. That is what is lacking and his encouragement for them to book a cruise tends to aim them to the HC cabins. I'm positive that Ruth and I are not the only ones that had to book a standard cabin a time or two. Fortunately we worked out a system that was doable. If you think it is tight with one scooter in a standard cabin, please try it with two mobility scooters.

 

Please take a moment and think about it. If multiple TAs start promoting things like this, if and when will there ever be accessible cabins available? Yes, we have booked a few cabins when a cruise itinerary was first released. However, are you aware that there are some people that book multiple cabins the first day they open up for bookings and then as they make up their minds as to which cruise they will take, they start canceling the others. The problem with that is the fact that cancelled cruises normally go into general inventory and loose their HC status. Ruth and I grabbed one of those cabins once because we knew the cabin number.

 

Sorry if I sound like an old stick in the mud, but in addition to being disabled, I'm not getting any younger thus a few age challenges start sneaking in after you pass that ¾ century mark. I'm still able to travel alone and be fully independent, however it is not easy. As many of you know, people all over the world are wonderful and it seems like there is always someone to help if there is a problem.

 

The issue is not what he is promoting, it is the way he is promoting it. When he stated the HC cabins are 50% larger, he should have included a plea for them to not book an HC cabin. Actually, it probably would have been better if he had not made any comment about the size. A comment about the HC not having any other options would have been more appropriate.

 

Seems like every time I suggest using HC placards, people assume they include personal info or think I'm crazy. I'll certainly support any logical solution anyone else can come up with. As long has the handicap does not want any personal info released, I cannot think of any other solutions for cruise lines to control the use of HC cabins. It really works good in Europe.

 

I think we all enjoy cruising regardless of the inconveniences. Also, I hope accessible cabins will be available for each and everyone of us for the cruises we desire. But at some point we have to make a stand and attempt to correct the current problem.

 

I certainly do no have a problem writing to the Cruise lines suggesting a possible solution to the current problem or even writing to ADA. Unless we do something, it is not going to get any better. Please, not only think of your parents needs, think of your future generations needs.

 

Betty

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3 hours ago, raindropsalways said:

This takes us right back to the reason the US cruise lines cannot verify the need for an HC cabin. If we would follow the European lead,

Seems like every time I suggest using HC placards, people assume they include personal info or think I'm crazy. I'll certainly support any logical solution anyone else can come up with. As long has the handicap does not want any personal info released, I cannot think of any other solutions for cruise lines to control the use of HC cabins. It really works good in Europe.

 

However, are you aware that there are some people that book multiple cabins the first day they open up for bookings and then as they make up their minds as to which cruise they will take, they start canceling the others. The problem with that is the fact that cancelled cruises normally go into general inventory and loose their HC status. 

 

Betty

Hi Betty,

Can please explain what you mean by the European system? 

I'm from the UK and have only sailed with RCI. All I do is fill in a special needs form, which is given to me at the time of booking. I have never been asked to provide proof of need.

 

Maybe accessible cabins bookings should be made into non refundable. 

In the UK all our booking are non refundable. With RCI I can even book an accessible cabin on their own website. I have ring their office. Or in my case I get my TA to ring them.

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2 hours ago, Bloodgem said:

Hi Betty,

Can please explain what you mean by the European system? 

I'm from the UK and have only sailed with RCI. All I do is fill in a special needs form, which is given to me at the time of booking. I have never been asked to provide proof of need.

 

Maybe accessible cabins bookings should be made into non refundable. 

In the UK all our booking are non refundable. With RCI I can even book an accessible cabin on their own website. I have ring their office. Or in my case I get my TA to ring them.

 

Sorry, I am not familiar how they control anything with cruising in Europe. However, when on land sight seeing, if one shows their HC card (placard, handicap parking permit) the helper normally gets in free. On one of our trips in London, we visited the Tower of London.  When the clerk asked which one of us was the helper, we just explained that we help each other. They only charged us for one entry. In Denmark at Kronborg, we really threw the clerk a mess. Ruth and I had the Copenhagen Card, which gave us a discount, however we were also entitled to the “helper” being free of charge. And to really confuse matters, there was three of us on mobility scooters. My cousin is also disabled. In other words, it was a very cheap day for all fours of us. My cousin's wife was with us. Denmark is very adamant about using the HC placard. It does not matter if you are on a scooter, if you do not have a placard, you pay full price, no discount. In Rosenborg Castle, if the disabled person wants to see the Crown Jewels, their helper has to physically carry them up and down the stairs. Fortunately, I saw the crown jewels before I became disabled.

 

Hope this clarifies things for you. Basically, I am suggesting there is already a non-invasive source to prove a person is disabled that could be used by the Cruise Lines to prevent anyone and everyone that is not disabled from booking the cabins for the disabled. As it is now, the cruise line does not have anyway to control who books what.

 

The problem of some disabled individuals booking multiple cabins while deciding is not half as bad as non disabled booking cabins. If the non disabled did not book the cabins in the first place, a disabled person would not have to use any special system to be assured of getting an HC cabin.

 

Non-refundable would just be an additional hardship put on the disabled. I did not have any plans or anticipate that I would have to cancel a cruise. Regardless, some nasty doctor told me that I had to have a by-pass (heart) operation instead of cruising. On the plus side, he released me early enough that I was able to catch up with Ruth and Rose on the second cruise.

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Posted (edited)

Are you recommending that people should go to the DMV for a handicap parking placard to prove they are disabled sufficiently to warrant a special cruise cabin? Do you think they should also be required to display a  placard if they use the handicap stall in a bathroom?  

Why should a person with a HDP placard be given special rates for tourist attractions?

Let's just acknowledge that those who get first booking for a hdp cabin make their travel plans well in advance-just as those who prefer sailing in any specific cabin must do.  

 

As you can tell, I am getting tired of the bellyaching about not getting a specific cabin because someone else got their plans together first.

 

ps There is insurance to purchase if you book a non-refundable cruise and then cannot sail.

Edited by gadaboutgal

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Part of the problem is that they don’t have any partly accessible cabins.

i need grab bars in the shower, the higher toilet, and grab bars at the toilet.

 

Sometimes the step up into the bathroom is no big deal,  other times it is.  

So how do you think you should allocate the accessible rooms?  Do I qualify?  

 

On my last cruise, I could not get into an accessible cabin, as we had booked it well before I needed the assistance devices.  We used a standard cabin.  I had to get out of my wheelchair to fold it to get through the door of the room.  I can walk around the room, but if I’m having a bad day, I can’t do much more.  

 

  I use a wheelchair part time, a manual that folds.  Some days I can walk, some days I cannot.   To look at me, you would never know it.

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3 hours ago, Algebralovr said:

Part of the problem is that they don’t have any partly accessible cabins.

i need grab bars in the shower, the higher toilet, and grab bars at the toilet.

 

Sometimes the step up into the bathroom is no big deal,  other times it is.  

So how do you think you should allocate the accessible rooms?  Do I qualify?  

This is exactly my situation. I have usually booked inside regular cabins in the past; however, it has always been a struggle to do that step up in the bathroom and my balance is becoming incredibly non-cooperative.    

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23 hours ago, raindropsalways said:

 

Sorry, I am not familiar how they control anything with cruising in Europe. However, when on land sight seeing, if one shows their HC card (placard, handicap parking permit) the helper normally gets in free. On one of our trips in London, we visited the Tower of London.  When the clerk asked which one of us was the helper, we just explained that we help each other. They only charged us for one entry. In Denmark at Kronborg, we really threw the clerk a mess. Ruth and I had the Copenhagen Card, which gave us a discount, however we were also entitled to the “helper” being free of charge. And to really confuse matters, there was three of us on mobility scooters. My cousin is also disabled. In other words, it was a very cheap day for all fours of us. My cousin's wife was with us. Denmark is very adamant about using the HC placard. It does not matter if you are on a scooter, if you do not have a placard, you pay full price, no discount. In Rosenborg Castle, if the disabled person wants to see the Crown Jewels, their helper has to physically carry them up and down the stairs. Fortunately, I saw the crown jewels before I became disabled.

 

Hope this clarifies things for you. Basically, I am suggesting there is already a non-invasive source to prove a person is disabled that could be used by the Cruise Lines to prevent anyone and everyone that is not disabled from booking the cabins for the disabled. As it is now, the cruise line does not have anyway to control who books what.

 

The problem of some disabled individuals booking multiple cabins while deciding is not half as bad as non disabled booking cabins. If the non disabled did not book the cabins in the first place, a disabled person would not have to use any special system to be assured of getting an HC cabin.

 

Non-refundable would just be an additional hardship put on the disabled. I did not have any plans or anticipate that I would have to cancel a cruise. Regardless, some nasty doctor told me that I had to have a by-pass (heart) operation instead of cruising. On the plus side, he released me early enough that I was able to catch up with Ruth and Rose on the second cruise.

Thank you for explaining

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I have repeatedly been told that the cruise lines cannot ask for doctor's verification of an individual's handicap because that is “personal” information. Thus the placard is the only thing I am aware of that will provide proof a person is disabled and not include any personal information. I am receptive to any system that would allow the cruise lines to verify that a person is disabled, thus requires accommodations to make it possible for them to cruise.

 

Are you aware of what the test for disability involves? Ask your doctor to test you and fill out the paper work for the placard. It is that simple. The test basically determines if you are capable of maneuvering a specified distance without the possibility of bodily harm or death. That is what the disabled have to live with. I can guarantee you that it is no fun.

 

Carnival and another cruise line are offering the ambulatory accessible cabins. Thus there currently is an option for those that do not require all the necessities of the standard HC cabins. I am not familiar with those cabins, only that apparently they work well for cruisers with limited special needs.

 

Ruth had Charlotte Marie Tooth disease. Regardless, she and I managed to travel around the world. Yes, she was disabled, but she did not depend on always getting an accessible (HC) cabin. In stead, she made things that would make life easier for herself. She made a little 2” high step stool with a cord tied to it for lifting off floor, that she would use when ever we got stuck in a standard cabin. A perfect height to get in the bathroom. Unless something has changed in the past few months, the cruise lines always have shower stools available, just ask or fill out one of their special needs forms before you cruise and submit it. Fortunately, I have not been stuck in a standard cabin for some time, regardless, it seems like most had minimal grab bars. Ruth could walk with crutches, regardless it was a rather clumsy walk. I think I held my breath every step she took.

 

I personally procrastinated getting my placard and license plates. A doctor had suggested me getting it four or five years before I finally agreed. And yes, I cheated by getting a child's two wheel electric scooter with a seat and my doctor gave me the necessary paper work to take it on plans as a medical device.... but I still was not “disabled”. Oh, I can walk, it is just difficult to breath when ever I exert myself, very difficult. Even had to give up swimming and just floating in the water is not any fun. To be very honest, I preferred the two wheel child's scooter, but it really lacked safety factors. My son was really happy when I got the mobility scooter.

 

So please, if you are disabled, get the placard and if you have a vehicle the plates. Make life easier for yourself and put those around you at ease. If you would not want to use it for proof, that is not important.

 

Believe that someone misread an earlier post. I stated that the “helper” gets in free and even indicated that the helper would have to carry the disabled up and down the stairs. The Copenhagen card gives a discount, however I failed to state that one has to purchase the Copenhagen card and it benefits all that purchase it. I also failed to state that if the HC cabins are not booked by a certain date or time element they go into general booking and anyone can book them. This at least allows the disabled an opportunity to book one. And yes, there are some disabled that use the system, which is also wrong.

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My husband is a quadriplegic and full time wheelchair user due to a progressive neurological disease.  Cruising is one of the easiest ways for him to vacation because of all the amenities offered for disabled persons on the ship.  We absolutely must have an accessible room or cannot cruise which is why we book our cruises about 14-18 months out.  That being said I certainly hope people do not book accessible rooms simply because they use a scooter and it is convenient to have the extra space in the cabin.  I realize everyone has different needs and the cruiselines are unable to ask specifics about disabilities.  Just realize that if you don't require some or all  of the amenities provided in the handicap rooms you could be locking someone out of a cruise because they do need the amenities.  Perhaps someday cruise lines will increase the number of handicap rooms or provide storage/charging areas for scooters outside the rooms but until then please think about your needs when booking the room.

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46 minutes ago, orkaren1 said:

My husband is a quadriplegic and full time wheelchair user due to a progressive neurological disease.  Cruising is one of the easiest ways for him to vacation because of all the amenities offered for disabled persons on the ship.  We absolutely must have an accessible room or cannot cruise which is why we book our cruises about 14-18 months out.  That being said I certainly hope people do not book accessible rooms simply because they use a scooter and it is convenient to have the extra space in the cabin.  I realize everyone has different needs and the cruiselines are unable to ask specifics about disabilities.  Just realize that if you don't require some or all  of the amenities provided in the handicap rooms you could be locking someone out of a cruise because they do need the amenities.  Perhaps someday cruise lines will increase the number of handicap rooms or provide storage/charging areas for scooters outside the rooms but until then please think about your needs when booking the room.

I have a mobility scooter that I have to use when we take a cruise.   I don't really need the special facilities in the accessible cabins but I do need to be able to keep my scooter in the cabin.   I have to plug it in to charge the battery and there is no place else to keep in on the ship.  

 

I agree that cruise lines should provide storage/charging areas for scooters.   I could book any cabin and let the people who need  the accessible cabins have them.  

 

It is not possible for me to have a regular size cabin because most of them don't have the room for the scooter.    Sometimes even trying to book an accessible cabin one year ahead we are not able to get an accessible cabin.   A few times we found posts that mentioned an extra large cabin (not accessible) and we jumped on the chance to have that cabin.   I missed a couple of the features from the accessible cabin but managed okay without them.    I was happy to have the space for my scooter.

 

I really hope that the cruise lines can make some changes for the scooter users and leave the accessible cabins to those who really need them.

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Orkaren1 and Mesico8, thank you very much for your post and comments.

 

Your reminded me of something that may be of interest to those using scooters for comfort or just to make things easier. On a fairly recent Regal Princess cruise, Princess took the scooters for all those in standard cabins and charged them every night and returned in the morning. I my case, my scooter stayed in our closet and I charged it since I could not risk being without it over night. With this in mind, I would suggest that anyone sailing on Princess and can suffice without their scooter contact Princess to verify if the ship they wish to sail on offers the same service.

 

In past history, it seems like when one cruise line implements a procedure, the other cruise lines follow shortly. Thus there is a possibility that other cruise lines may also be providing this service. Certainly worth considering.

 

For those of you that a have a problem with the high step, get a piece of 2” styrofoam and make a step. It is light weight and you will never know it is in your luggage. For those of you requiring grab bars, contact the cruise line. My very first cruise, I was disgusted with the abundance of grab bars in the bathroom. At that time, I did not know what they were for.

 

We booked only one ambulatory accessible cabin. Would have probably been great for a couple and one scooter. But three old ladies and two scooters were not practical. Large fully accessible roll in bathroom. Assuming no one takes hot steamy showers, probably an excellent place to park a scooter or wheelchair. Other that the bathroom, a typical basic cabin with a door wide enough for scooter to get through. Would assume it would accommodate a wheel chair, regardless would verify if using a wheelchair.

 

For anyone that wants accessible cabin for comfort or practical needs, please remember there are many that do not have options, anything else could be life threatening. That is the big factor and the real reason for the HC cabins.

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2 hours ago, mexico8 said:

I have a mobility scooter that I have to use when we take a cruise.   I don't really need the special facilities in the accessible cabins but I do need to be able to keep my scooter in the cabin.   I have to plug it in to charge the battery and there is no place else to keep in on the ship.  

 

I agree that cruise lines should provide storage/charging areas for scooters.   I could book any cabin and let the people who need  the accessible cabins have them.  

 

It is not possible for me to have a regular size cabin because most of them don't have the room for the scooter.    Sometimes even trying to book an accessible cabin one year ahead we are not able to get an accessible cabin.   A few times we found posts that mentioned an extra large cabin (not accessible) and we jumped on the chance to have that cabin.   I missed a couple of the features from the accessible cabin but managed okay without them.    I was happy to have the space for my scooter.

 

I really hope that the cruise lines can make some changes for the scooter users and leave the accessible cabins to those who really need them.

Unfortunately people booking accessible cabins when as you said you don't really need the special facilities in the accessible cabins is exactly the reason my husband has trouble getting an accessible cabin.  My husband absolutely cannot cruise at all unless he is in an accessible cabin.  He is unable to stand or walk at all and requires the raised toilet seat with grab bars, roll in shower, etc.  

 

Before he became a full time wheelchair user he used a scooter on cruises.  It was a tight fit getting it through the door and finding space in the room to store and charge it.  We would request a shower chair and toilet support but would never have considered booking an accessible cabin just to have the extra room to store the scooter.  As I said before, hopefully the cruiselines will sometime make arrangements to store or charge scooters without taking up room space.  Until then please, please, please do not book an accessible cabin unless you really need most if not all of the facilities provided in these rooms.  You are making it more difficult for people who need these rooms by booking them just to store your scooter.  A conventional sized scooter will fit in any cruise cabin.

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1 hour ago, raindropsalways said:

Orkaren1 and Mesico8, thank you very much for your post and comments.

 

Your reminded me of something that may be of interest to those using scooters for comfort or just to make things easier. On a fairly recent Regal Princess cruise, Princess took the scooters for all those in standard cabins and charged them every night and returned in the morning. I my case, my scooter stayed in our closet and I charged it since I could not risk being without it over night. With this in mind, I would suggest that anyone sailing on Princess and can suffice without their scooter contact Princess to verify if the ship they wish to sail on offers the same service.

 

In past history, it seems like when one cruise line implements a procedure, the other cruise lines follow shortly. Thus there is a possibility that other cruise lines may also be providing this service. Certainly worth considering.

 

For those of you that a have a problem with the high step, get a piece of 2” styrofoam and make a step. It is light weight and you will never know it is in your luggage. For those of you requiring grab bars, contact the cruise line. My very first cruise, I was disgusted with the abundance of grab bars in the bathroom. At that time, I did not know what they were for.

 

We booked only one ambulatory accessible cabin. Would have probably been great for a couple and one scooter. But three old ladies and two scooters were not practical. Large fully accessible roll in bathroom. Assuming no one takes hot steamy showers, probably an excellent place to park a scooter or wheelchair. Other that the bathroom, a typical basic cabin with a door wide enough for scooter to get through. Would assume it would accommodate a wheel chair, regardless would verify if using a wheelchair.

 

For anyone that wants accessible cabin for comfort or practical needs, please remember there are many that do not have options, anything else could be life threatening. That is the big factor and the real reason for the HC cabins.

Thank you, it sounds like you get how difficult it can be for someone who can't cruise without the accomodations provided in a HC cabin.  Many people just don't understand and think it is okay to book a HC cabin just because they use a scooter and like the extra room

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1 hour ago, orkaren1 said:

Thank you, it sounds like you get how difficult it can be for someone who can't cruise without the accomodations provided in a HC cabin.  Many people just don't understand and think it is okay to book a HC cabin just because they use a scooter and like the extra room

 

Yes, I fully understand the problems. However, at present there is not any way the cruise lines can control the problem because a “Doctor's statement” might include “personal” information. To me, my life is more important than who knows I have lung issues. Regardless, others do not feel the same. However, there is one document in the United States that proves disability and does not include any info regarding a person's illness. That happens to be the placard for the disabled. The one we hang in our vehicle window. Even though it does not include the individual's name, it can be traced back to the individual. I'm pushing to find enough disabled who would also be willing to throw the possibility at the ADA, who in turn could include that fact in their requirements which the cruise lines follow. The cruise lines could enforce it on their own, but would probably need a little push and they do abide by the ADA rules.

 

I'm positive there is an abundance of people that can benefit from the use of a scooter, however walking is not a life threatening issue for them. That is the major difference.

 

There is at least one cruise line that I know has accommodations for both the deaf and blind in standard cabins.  But mobility devices to require space.  Regardless, I've spent many nights in a standard cabin with two scooters.  It is not easy.

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1 hour ago, raindropsalways said:

 

Yes, I fully understand the problems. However, at present there is not any way the cruise lines can control the problem because a “Doctor's statement” might include “personal” information. To me, my life is more important than who knows I have lung issues. Regardless, others do not feel the same. However, there is one document in the United States that proves disability and does not include any info regarding a person's illness. That happens to be the placard for the disabled. The one we hang in our vehicle window. Even though it does not include the individual's name, it can be traced back to the individual. I'm pushing to find enough disabled who would also be willing to throw the possibility at the ADA, who in turn could include that fact in their requirements which the cruise lines follow. The cruise lines could enforce it on their own, but would probably need a little push and they do abide by the ADA rules.

 

I'm positive there is an abundance of people that can benefit from the use of a scooter, however walking is not a life threatening issue for them. That is the major difference.

 

There is at least one cruise line that I know has accommodations for both the deaf and blind in standard cabins.  But mobility devices to require space.  Regardless, I've spent many nights in a standard cabin with two scooters.  It is not easy

Every day I park somewhere it seems all the handicap parking spaces are full and most of the cars have placards.  I can't tell you how many times I have seen people with placards in handicap spots practically jumping out of their cars and running.  I have even seen people suddenly start limping when they see me getting my husband out of the car into his wheelchair.  From what I have seen people just ask their physician to sign the placard application and they don't seem to question the true need for a placard.  I realize people may have disabilities that are not evident and can't walk far for various reasons so the parking situation isn't a big issue for me.  I just get upset when I see blogs about people thinking they need an accessible cabin just because they want more room to store their scooter that they don't even use when they are at their home or going short distances. There has to be someway the cruiselines can verify accessibility needs without being intrusive into personal medical informationl.  As for ADA requirements I am sure the cruiselines meet the basic standards and requirements.  They are actually pretty lax as to what is required.

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I honestly do not know all the specifics about the ambulatory accessible cabins or the name of the both cruise lines that offer them. I am aware that Carnival offers them and think maybe Royal Caribbean does on the new ships. I believe the bathroom is one of the main areas with modifications. Regardless, I would recommend verifying with cruise line before booking.

 

Yes, the placards are abused. When I first got my placard, I did not get my HC plates until the existing plates expired. At that particular time, my son and his wife only had one car. So I shared my van with my daughter-in-law. However, I found out she was using the placard for her own convenience so this nasty MIL hid the placard in my purse. It was probably close to eight months before I got the plates and then my son suggested to her not to park in the HC spots. Yes, the placards are abused. To my knowledge, neither of my granddaughters or my son have ever taken advantage of the HC plates when driving my van.

 

Seems like down town Minneapolis and most of the major shopping places have extensive HC parking. A corner business area with a few shops has minimal HC parking. It is safer to drive to a major shopping area. Regardless, I have seen HC parking abused also in addition to knowing that my DIL did it until I found out.

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People could use fake HC badges to provide proof of disability.

 

 

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10 hours ago, orkaren1 said:

Every day I park somewhere it seems all the handicap parking spaces are full and most of the cars have placards.  I can't tell you how many times I have seen people with placards in handicap spots practically jumping out of their cars and running.  I have even seen people suddenly start limping when they see me getting my husband out of the car into his wheelchair.  From what I have seen people just ask their physician to sign the placard application and they don't seem to question the true need for a placard.  I realize people may have disabilities that are not evident and can't walk far for various reasons so the parking situation isn't a big issue for me.  I just get upset when I see blogs about people thinking they need an accessible cabin just because they want more room to store their scooter that they don't even use when they are at their home or going short distances. There has to be someway the cruiselines can verify accessibility needs without being intrusive into personal medical informationl.  As for ADA requirements I am sure the cruiselines meet the basic standards and requirements.  They are actually pretty lax as to what is required.

I don't need all the facilities in the accessible cabins but I do use the shower chair and I have yet to have a non-accessible cabin that would accommodate my scooter.   I also have trouble just to get it in the cabin because most hallways are not wide enough for me to even get it in the door of the cabin.   

 

I do have medical issues and would not be able to make the walk from my cabin to the dining room on most of the ships.    All the comments about scooter users abusing the system is really not fair.   Just because we are not in wheelchairs does not make us able bodied.   We need the accessible cabin so that we can be on the cruise.   I could not book a non-accessible cabin on most of the ships.   Occasionally I have found a larger cabin but it's rare.   

 

We have been unable to take some cruises because there was not an accessible cabin.  When we get to ports that have a tender I stay on the ship.   I think a lot of people are being too hard on those of us with scooters.   We need the scooter as much as they need their wheelchairs and I think most of us do have the accessible placard.   My doctor had to fill out a lengthy questionnaire to get mine.

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We cruise with 2 scooters - my cruise partner's scooter is narrow enough to fit in the cabin, but mine is about 1/2 an inch too wide to fit in a standard cabin.  Therefore, we are left with no alternative but to book a handicapped cabin.  We would do the ambulatory accessible as we don't need the roll in bathroom as the reduce step height is manageable, but they still have a standard door on them.  We have been very lucky on our last few cruises that our room stewards gave us permission to park in the elevator lobby (in a corner out of the way) and then we try to either find somewhere on board to charge (we only need to recharge every 2 or 3 days, generally), or on our most recent Celebrity cruise, the steward actually took the scooters and charged them for us and returned them to the elevator lobby early the next morning.  

 

A large part of the problem is that every time a new ship launches or an existing ship in the fleet is refurbed, the cruise lines have to create more cabins, thus making the cabins that are already on the ship smaller.  We were in a verandah cabin on the Summit in June and one scooter in that cabin would have been a nightmare to get around and there was no way two would have fit (even if mine would have fit through the door).

 

However, with the ambulatory accessible cabins that Carnival Corp offers on their lines, if they would just widen the entry door a couple of inches, that would help tremendously : ))

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On 8/24/2019 at 6:54 PM, Algebralovr said:

Part of the problem is that they don’t have any partly accessible cabins.

i need grab bars in the shower, the higher toilet, and grab bars at the toilet.

 

Sometimes the step up into the bathroom is no big deal,  other times it is.  

So how do you think you should allocate the accessible rooms?  Do I qualify?  

 

On my last cruise, I could not get into an accessible cabin, as we had booked it well before I needed the assistance devices.  We used a standard cabin.  I had to get out of my wheelchair to fold it to get through the door of the room.  I can walk around the room, but if I’m having a bad day, I can’t do much more.  

 

  I use a wheelchair part time, a manual that folds.  Some days I can walk, some days I cannot.   To look at me, you would never know it.

 

Carnival has "ambulatory accessible" cabins, which are exactly as you describe.

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