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raindropsalways

Proof as to why non-disabled are booking cabins for disabled

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2 hours ago, mexico8 said:

I don't need all the facilities in the accessible cabins but I do use the shower chair and I have yet to have a non-accessible cabin that would accommodate my scooter.   I also have trouble just to get it in the cabin because most hallways are not wide enough for me to even get it in the door of the cabin.   

 

I do have medical issues and would not be able to make the walk from my cabin to the dining room on most of the ships.    All the comments about scooter users abusing the system is really not fair.   Just because we are not in wheelchairs does not make us able bodied.   We need the accessible cabin so that we can be on the cruise.   I could not book a non-accessible cabin on most of the ships.   Occasionally I have found a larger cabin but it's rare.   

 

We have been unable to take some cruises because there was not an accessible cabin.  When we get to ports that have a tender I stay on the ship.   I think a lot of people are being too hard on those of us with scooters.   We need the scooter as much as they need their wheelchairs and I think most of us do have the accessible placard.   My doctor had to fill out a lengthy questionnaire to get mine.

In the future look into the Junior Suites ( that's what they are called on Royal Caribbean, not sure what other cruiselines call them or if they have them). The JS are the same size as an accessible balcony room and have wider doors and they are usually readily available, in fact I just checked RC website and there are still some available for cruises less than 2 months out The cruiseline will provide a shower chair and they have availability of other handicap devices that might aid you.  This might be a better option for you than getting an accessible room and there is more availability.

 

Most ports have very limited because other countries do not have ADA laws.  We rarely go on excursions.  Even  with some excursions that are advertised as accessible the person still needs to be able to manuver up a few stairs or be able to stand and get into the van/bus on their own or with assistance.  My husband is unable to do either of those things.  On our upcoming cruise we will only be getting off the ship at one port.  We have arranged a private tour.  The van can hold my husband's wheelchair but he will be lifted into the van.  Luckily my son and son in law will be with us and can do the lifting.  This is the only way we can go on any excursions.

 

I am glad your state requires an extensive questionaire to obtain a HC parking placard.  We live in Florida and all we need is for the physician to sign a paper and check a box that says the person cannot walk far distances.  Needless to say there are many people who get placards when they don't really need them that badly.  I have even seen blogs on Disney sites that tell people how to get a temporary placard so they can park closer to the park entrance. Even though we have a placard, I only use the HC spots if I need to get my husband out of and back into the car.  Many times there are no more HC spots available and I have to park in a regular space. In cases like this I will park in the middle of two spaces or block the drive because I need the space to get my husband's wheelchair and lift close to the car.  

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14 minutes ago, Schoifmom said:

 

Carnival has "ambulatory accessible" cabins, which are exactly as you describe.

Carnival may, but Celebrity does not.  
Note, however, that I still could not roll through the door of my stateroom on my last cruise.  The door was not wide enough, even for a relatively narrow WC.  

 

On that same cruise,  there was a person with a rented scooter just a room or two down the hall.  He also did not have an accessible room.  The issue was that he then parked the scooter in the hallway.  When he did this, there was not sufficient room for me to get through the hallway in my wheelchair.  The rules from the cruise line state that scooters must be stored in the stateroom, not the hallway. That is why even someone who doesn't always use a scooter will reserve an accessible room.  Because the door is not wide enough for the scooter to go through the door.  

We had to complain to guest services a number of times and finally the other guest started parking his scooter in the corner of the elevator area, rather than the hallway leading to the staterooms.  I heard him complaining one time about having to walk from his stateroom to there to get to his scooter.  Um, I was in a manual wheelchair and had been completely non-weight bearing for 11 weeks.  I was finally given permission to put weight on the leg just 5 days before we flew out.  I didn't want to hear it.

 

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Posted (edited)

I had to look of the HC Badge.... and have been laughing at myself. The HC Badge and placard are the same thing. Now I understand why others in that part of the world were bewildered with my some of my comments. Sorry for misleading you.

 

Please, no one is picking on those that use scooters who are disabled. It is those using scooters that are not disabled. Mobility scooters have made things possible for many people who are not disabled but due to age or other reasons can benefit by the use of a mobility scooter. I fully understand that and wish that there was a solution. However, walking is not life threatening for those. The scooter makes it easier and I wish that those people could also be accommodated. Regardless, they have options and the disabled do not have the options. Also, to my knowledge, all the cruise lines indicate door width and are very up front with that information. The large mobility scooters do not fit through any of the standard doors. The cabin size is a matter of convenience, it is the doors that determine who or what can enter. I am not familiar with wheelchairs, however believe that many are also rather wide. Thus they also require the larger doors and are probably dealing with the same issues.

 

I am aware there are doctors that will sign letters or airline flight forms declaring a person handicap. However I have not ever heard of any doctor signing a government document (state or federal) declaring a person handicap that is not handicap. There are some very serious penalties for that and a doctor could loose their license. I travel with a valid blanket letter and a list of my prescriptions for my own safety and to appease the airlines. I had an rather serious accident while on a cruise a few years ago and ended up in two different hospitals and a nursing home. Every doctor along the way thanked me for the documentation. I also have travel insurance for every trip.

 

Both Ruth and I use the small scooters, thus not a problem getting through the doors of a standard cabin and we would try to find a place to park my scooter out of the way. Ruth was able to use her crutches, but the scooter was really the best. Yes, two scooters in a standard cabin are a challenge and when you add a third person it really becomes togetherness. Even many of the accessible cabins are cramped with two scooters.

 

Also, more and more of the ships are making an effort to accommodate us. Unfortunately, their first consideration is the profits and space becomes a valuable issue. I did notice that one cruise line was starting to list the toilet height. It definitely is a consideration.

 

The term “accessible” relates to the turning space required by the old standard wheelchairs and the width of those wheelchairs. Thus wider doors and more space inside the cabin. Most travel scooters are actually smaller. Regardless, space is required. Most of the basic mobility scooters are larger. The original standard mobility scooters are larger and used by many. They are actually safer than the travel scooters but really limits where a person can go.

 

Really doubt that anyone wishes to deprive anyone of a cruise, but I am a strong believer that those that do not have any options be given first priority and until the cruise lines has a way to control who books the cabins, it cannot be controlled. Again, to my knowledge, the placard or HC Badge are documents that could be used for proof. Also, in case I missed any local descriptions, the placard and HC Badge are the local “handicap parking permits”. They do not contain any personal info, however our local placards have a serial number that can be traced to an individual. Also, as I stated above, I really doubt that any real doctor is going to sign off on any government form unless the person is truly disabled. That is a NO NO with hefty penalties..

 

None of us can stop those who violate the rules.  Yes, HC paring is also abused. 

Edited by raindropsalways

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UK HC Badge also have a serial number that can be traced to an individual.

 

In the UK there are other ways of obtaining fake HC badges, without getting a doctor to sign a form.

 

If you know the right type of people or the right type of website, you can buy fake HC badges.

Recently a family were found guilty of fraud because they scanned a relatives HC badge. They then printed out copies of the badge and use them, (https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/25/family-used-fake-disabled-badges-avoid-12-parking-fees-fined-3000-9011592/). I don't know if it would be possible to scan and print an US placard?

 

If cruise lines are not allowed to verify or cannot be bothered to verify if a HC badge is genuine. People could use fake HC badges as proof of disability.

 

I'm not trying to pour cold water on your idea of using HC badges as proof of disability.  I'm just trying to point out aspects you may not have considered. 

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My husband uses a "mobility device" called a "Zinger Chair."  It is not ADA approved but fits our needs perfectly.  He lost his right leg above the knee just a year and a half ago so we are still learning to adjust to our new normal.  We have since taken 3 cruises in accessible cabins with another upcoming in November.  A fully accessible cabin is a necessity.  Our first cabin was in an older ship and the transitions into the cabin, bathroom and balcony were difficult... they were not completely flush.  The others on Oasis of the Seas and Regal Princess were perfect.  We expect our HC cabin on the new Sky Princess will also be perfect.

 

For people with mobility issues that do not need an ADA approved device, I suggest they look into one of the newer, light weight, folding power chairs.  Ours was not covered by insurance but to have one that is easy to transport in almost any car without the expense of a lift (it only weighs 46 lbs.) and is only 25" wide was well worth the cost.

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The big problem is there are only three categories I am aware of, Amblatory (on some lines) Accessible, and regular. As someone who has spinal issues that mean I frequently use a wheelchair (but some days get by without) I have to book an accessible cabin for a few reasons, one I need the grab bars (why these aren’t fitted in every cabin I have no idea, and two just can’t get my chair through the door of a standard cabin. If the had a place to park and charge your chair, scooter, I could probably use sticks from the cabin door to the bed while Mrs Gut took the chair off to charge it.

 

The lines really need to sit down with passengers with a range of needs and see how they can better accommodate all the needs.

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On 8/27/2019 at 10:31 PM, GUT2407 said:

The lines really need to sit down with passengers with a range of needs and see how they can better accommodate all the needs.

Does anyone reasonably think the cruise lines care enough to do this.  They really have enough "regular" type cruisers and are not in need of money from handicapped persons.  They do not provide the minimum HDC cabins that they do out of concern or the goodness of their hearts.  It's a business and the extra space needed is a drain on their allocatable space.  And that would also be true for any "scooter parking lots."  Just not going to happen!

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5 hours ago, gadaboutgal said:

Does anyone reasonably think the cruise lines care enough to do this.  They really have enough "regular" type cruisers and are not in need of money from handicapped persons.  They do not provide the minimum HDC cabins that they do out of concern or the goodness of their hearts.  It's a business and the extra space needed is a drain on their allocatable space.  And that would also be true for any "scooter parking lots."  Just not going to happen!

 

You are 100% right. Thus our only slim chance of getting the accessible cabins in a reasonable booking time element would be something that could verify a person is disabled. As I previously stated, it is unlikely that a real doctor would sign a government form if not a true fact. If for any reason a doctor is not willing to submit the applicable forms for the HC parking, maybe that individual should re-evaluate his or her condition. All businesses are stuck with ADA requirements, thus it is not just the cruise lines. If all the businesses had to accommodate each and every one's hardships no body would be able to afford much of anything. The things that makes it possible for the disabled to travel are costly to the sources. They are not volunteer services.

 

Being disabled is not a nasty word or a lessor citizen. Also, just because someone is physically disabled, that does not mean there is anything wrong with their minds or that they are also mentally disabled. Unfortunately, those are aspects that prevent many truly disabled people from applying for anything suggesting they are disabled.

 

I truly think if the disabled stuck together and pushed for using the “parking permit” as proof, we would have a chance. Yes, someone somewhere would probably abuse it also. Regardless, there is less chance of forged parking permits than a letter from a doctor.

 

I have not yet found a “mailing” address for ADA. Regardless, I'm re-submitting my “special needs” forms for my up-coming cruises with a copy of my placard and will ask the respective departments to forward a copy of my letter to headquarters. I am current booked on Carnival, NCL, and Princess. I'm assuming that the letter to Princess will also end up in Carnival's hands. I am also looking at a Royal Caribbean cruise and if it materializes, I will do the same with them. When I can find a mailing address for ADA, I will also write to them. If anyone else is willing to send similar comments, it would probably help. Also, if anyone is aware of a mailing address (US mail or Email) for ADA, please share it. A form letter from multiple people would not offer as much of an impression as a distinct letter for each and every one.

 

Another consideration for the future would be one's driver's license.. However, I'm fairly positive that there are many that would feel a driver's license releases too much personal info. I am assuming that all states now incorporate some HC info on their driver's license. Even though Minnesota has incorporated codes for applicable info, I have not renewed my license since the changes have been made. From what I understand, our new license is now in conformance with a new federal ID format, thus all states should be similar. I do not think that the “Real ID necessarily includes HC info, however Minnesota's does. If all states do, it would be a perfect piece of identification. For those that feel it might be too personal, well you would have to decide which is more important, your life of the fact someone knows which state you live in.

 

For those of you that think paperwork is no big deal, I've got news for you. I had a life threatening situation on board a plane once. I showed them my paperwork signed by my doctor at the VA. However, they refused to honor it because it was on another airline's form. At that point, all I wanted to do was see my family before I died. Fortunately, I had access to enough inhalers that I survived. Regardless, after that experience, my doctor and I created a travel letter covering my condition and my needs and as a veteran, it is on VA (U.S. Government) letterhead. Every time an airline tells me it is not on their form, I simply ask them if they are not going to recognize the U.S. True, that is an advantage that many of you may not have. It has benefited me numerous times. One airline made a copy of both my letter and list of prescriptions and added a notation to my account. Thus I only have to show my ticket now.

 

For those of you that have limited abilities, but are not disabled, I do not have any answers. Other than a shower stool I am not aware of any regular portable items standard on cruise ships, At one time, I cruised on a ship that did offer toilet seat riser, but that may not be standard. Something like that would be a nuisance factor, regardless, a person could fairly easily travel with one. Life is life, nothing to be embarrassed about. Likewise, a little 2 inch step stool can be transported which would fit in most people's luggage. Grab bars... they probably went out with the stabilizers. Due to cost factors, the cruise lines are reluctant to include in standard rooms. Would a cane be doable for many of you... or have you even considered it? I used a cane for a couple years and it helped even though my problem is related to breathing.

 

I am open to suggestions on how to resolve the problem. I believe we all know the issues, we need to join together to resolve the problem. Those of you that do not consider yourselves handicap because of one issue should discuss the problem with your doctor. If that issue is life threatening or could cause you serious harm, you are disabled; admit it. You are not the first and I doubt that you will be the last to deny being disabled. I'm sure most of us have been there and done that.

 

Tomorrow I will devote myself to resubmitting my special needs forms to all three cruises. As well s my DD 214, I think my TA also has all my medical info on file. She can answer just about any questions regarding my disability. Non related to cruising, I was also to share some info regarding by-pass surgery that helped her son.

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I think the resolution to your problem is for you to book early-as soon as the specific cruise you want becomes available.                                                                                           I totally disagree with your placard campaign. The fact that one needs to be cognizant of is that not everyone wants or needs a handicap placard.  People in Manhattan and other cities with good public transportation do not request or use placards.  

It seems to me, you think that the disability that one person has takes precedence over the disability of another. 

 

To quote you:  "For those of you that have limited abilities, but are not disabled"    please know: Limited abilities are disabilities.  Disabilities do not come ranked, they are not always visible, and they do not always need a doctor to certify them. 

Book early.

 

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Another issue is that I need to leave the placard in the car, if I am parked in an accessible park, how do I then flash it around the ship.

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Yes, I do believe that some disabilities take presidence over others. I believe those classified as disabled by a doctor are the ones that have life threatening issues, thus they take priority over inconveniences. That is the reason I recommend that those who are experiencing hardships talk to their doctor and fully discuss their situation. If they are truly disabled, their doctor will encourage them to get the disabled status. As far as the placard, there is absolutely no reason to carry it on a cruise. As I indicated, I would send a “copy” of mine to the cruise line. Ruth and I always carried ours because we included so many land trips where we would use it. Never even considered showing it to anyone on the cruise. All the info is handled when one books the cabin, not after boarding the ship. With one exception. If the cruise line determines that a non disabled is in an accessible cabin, they may move them into a standard cabin of the same category and give that accessible cabin to a disabled person. It does not happen often, but it has happened. Also, anyone that is thinking up excuses not to approach the cruise lines about proof sort of causes others to wonder about that person's needs. Someplace in all my ranting, I openly asked for suggestions on how to control the problem. If you have some feasible suggestions, please share. I believe all of us are hoping to resolve the problems. Attacking each other is not the answer. If you have a solution, please share it. If anyone does not wish to contribute anything toward resolving the problem, that is entirely up to them. Regardless, they should not be so ready to put down anyone that is willing to make an effort to resolve the problem.

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3 hours ago, raindropsalways said:

 I openly asked for suggestions on how to control the problem. If you have some feasible suggestions, please share. I believe all of us are hoping to resolve the problems. Attacking each other is not the answer. If you have a solution, please share it. If anyone does not wish to contribute anything toward resolving the problem, that is entirely up to them. Regardless, they should not be so ready to put down anyone that is willing to make an effort to resolve the problem.

 I offered an alternate suggestion in post # 7 and you ruled it out due to extra expense, even though you can get insurance to cover booking non-refundable cruises. It seems, to me, you only either want suggestions that you like or will fit in with your live style.

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Guess I must have misunderstood whatever your logic may be. The able bodied would still be able to book them. That would not help anyone. If they are going to lie about their needs, a little thing like nonrefundable deposit would not stop them from booking. Yes, it would deter the disabled that book multiple cruises in an effort to have which ever one the decide on would probably change their ways, but they are not the major problem. If the able bodied would not abuse the system to start with, the disabled that feel they are forced to book multiple to be assured of getting one probably would not have to.

 

We all know that many of the cabins are booked by the able bodied strictly for the extra space plus there are those that feel they are disabled due to some limited abilities.

 

I do not have any idea as to why you have to book nonrefundable deposits. My cousin in Denmark never mentioned anything about nonrefundable deposit for her cruises. And my disabled cousin there wrote to one of the River cruise lines and told them what they had to do to make the cruises available to the disabled. However, his concern was just accessing the boats. As far as I know, there is not any nonrefundable deposits for any cruises in the U.S..

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In the UK, where I live, we can only book non-refundable cruises. Even if we sail out of the US. I myself only found out about refundable cruises when I joined CC. Royal Caribbean offer both refundable and non refundable cruises to US citizens

 

You were the one (in post 6) that mentioned that  disabled people book multiply accessible cabins, "Please take a moment and think about it. If multiple TAs start promoting things like this, if and when will there ever be accessible cabins available? Yes, we have booked a few cabins when a cruise itinerary was first released. However, are you aware that there are some people that book multiple cabins the first day they open up for bookings and then as they make up their minds as to which cruise they will take, they start canceling the others. The problem with that is the fact that cancelled cruises normally go into general inventory and loose their HC status. Ruth and I grabbed one of those cabins once because we knew the cabin number".

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Do you really think the cruise companies could get away with charging everyone a non-refundable deposit. And there is absolutely no way they could charge a specific group a non-refundable deposit. That would be discrimination. Absolute No, No.

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Raindropsalways you state "Yes, I do believe that some disabilities take presidence over others. I believe those classified as disabled by a doctor are the ones that have life threatening issues, thus they take priority over inconveniences"

So you are deciding to be the judge and jury over who is disabled and who is not!!!      I refer you to a site that surely you are  aware of:  Read https://www.disabled-world.com/definitions/disability-definitions.php

 

You are incorrect in stating cruise lines not charging non-refundable deposits.  Many do, including Princess and Royal Caribbean.

 

If I want to book the single Owner's suite or Royal suite on a cruise, I know that I will have to book it immediately when bookings open for that cruise,   an accessible room is no different

Again, I suggest if this is such a big issue for you:  book early and purchase insurance as most any other person who wants a special cabin on a ship-whether it be  the one and only Owner's suite or Royal suite or handicap cabin.

 

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At age 79 my husband became an above the knee amputee.  A year and a half later we are still adjusting to our new normal.  A roll in shower is a must as are grab bars when he must stand on just the one "good" leg.  He also must have room for his wheelchair to be bedside as he needs it during the night.  I also am disabled.  I lost about 1/3 of my heart to a severe heart attack and am unable to walk any distance without having to stop and rest.  So, in support of Raindropsalways post #36, I also believe that some disabilities take precedence over others.  Ours is a case in point: his disability should take precedence over mine.  His requires the accommodation of a fully accessible cabin while mine does not.

 

In my opinion, fully accessible accommodations, whether they are on a ship, hotel room, or anywhere else, should be available to those who truly require them.  

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Posted (edited)

What it boils down to is the apparent fact that the disabled do not want to provide proof they are disabled. Too many in the U.S. think it is something disgraceful.

 

The passes for our local mobility service are in two categories, temporary and permanent and even the permanent have to be renewed after so many years. In other words, it is controlled by a government operation. And yes, we pay for the service. A very modest amount per ride, however I would assume it covers all operational cost.

 

In addition, the new format for our state driver's license also includes info that we are disabled. However I do not know if all states incorporate that information.


And yes, if there are two people laying on the ground with injuries, I will help the one whose injuries are apt to result in death before the other person. If you feel that is wrong, I'm sorry, that is how I feel. And in the state I live in, the form for disabled parking specifically indicates that walking beyond a specific distance could result in injury or death.

 

And yes, there will always be those that book multiple cabins, and yes when they release the ones they do not want usually go into general bookings. However if you have a TA that specializes in booking the disabled, they know enough to ask about cabins that may have gone to general bookings. Even though I had a specific cabin number, it can be checked by anyone if they just ask by cabin numbers. In stead of asking for a particular category, ask about the availability of the cabins by number in the category seeking. Further more, this is a minor issue. The able bodied should not be booking the cabins designated for the disabled. So instead of making life more difficult for the disabled, how about making it more difficult for the able bodied to book the cabins.

 

At this point, I'll do my thing hoping I can help the disabled. I hope the rest of you do what ever you think will eliminate the problem.

 

SeaBurd - Thank you for understanding.  My disability is also related to the heart plus lungs.  Short showers are fine, but it takes me a while to get all the spots, thus that shower stool is definitely in need as well as the grab bars.

Edited by raindropsalways

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, SeaBurd said:

At age 79 my husband became an above the knee amputee.  A year and a half later we are still adjusting to our new normal.  A roll in shower is a must as are grab bars when he must stand on just the one "good" leg.  He also must have room for his wheelchair to be bedside as he needs it during the night.  I also am disabled.  I lost about 1/3 of my heart to a severe heart attack and am unable to walk any distance without having to stop and rest.  So, in support of Raindropsalways post #36, I also believe that some disabilities take precedence over others.  Ours is a case in point: his disability should take precedence over mine.  His requires the accommodation of a fully accessible cabin while mine does not.

 

In my opinion, fully accessible accommodations, whether they are on a ship, hotel room, or anywhere else, should be available to those who truly require them.  

But raindropalways would say your HD isn’t disabled as it’s not life threatening, (which they seem to think is a criteria) which shows the whole weakness in their argument.

 

i have no idea about America but here in Aus to get a parking permit the criteria is that walking 109m would negatively impact your health. (That covers a heck of a lot of those scooter and wheelchair users, because of heart conditions, lung conditions, limb conditions, like your good husband, spinal conditions, like me, and multiple other conditions).

Edited by GUT2407

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Please allow me to summarize the booking issues that raindropsalways has sets forth:  Only the truly disabled should be able to book the HDC's.                                                           Those with life threatening medical issues are the only true disabled.                                   Access to the cabins should be ranked  by the severity of the life                                          threatening medical issues.                                                                                                            To prove that the person is truly disabled, they should provide a placard from a state's DMV and the placard request should only be issued by a doctor who is willing to state that the individual suffers from a life threatening medical issue.

 

The faulty logic here is that if a person who has a life threatening medical issue requests a reservation on a cruise, they will  be refused by the cruise line as cruise lines  require all passengers be fit to travel.  They would not accept the responsibility of having a  disabled (life threatening) passenger on board one of their ships. 

Many people with medical issues that occur on the ship are put off at the nearest port for that reason.

Darn if I am going to certify to a cruise line that I am disabled person based on a life threatening disability!!!  

 

 

 

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I'm beginning to think you are one of the able bodied individuals attempting to prevent anyone from coming up with an option that would make it difficult for the able bodied to book the accessible cabins. You totally ignore the word “or” depending on what excuse you want to use.

 

As I stated, I will do what I think will help and I hope others will also do what they think will help.

 

We all know that the cabins are used by able bodied. Yes there are a few disabled that abuse the system, however when the able bodied are restricted there would no longer be the need for the disabled to book multiple cruises in hopes of getting one.

 

I wish each and every disabled person is able to book the cabin of their dreams.  As long as I can get the shower stool , I'll be able to cruise.  A riser for the toilet would also help, regardless, I can struggle through without one if need be.  A few more bruises on the bathroom floor are not going to be a major issue.

 

To all those sailing on the high seas in the future, have a wonderful cruise. 

 

Betty

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Reminds me of the biddy who wanted to berate me as I was LEAVING a handicapped space. She only stopped when I swung my legs out for her and showed her my prosthetics. Then she still had the nerve to sniff that she had it worse. (Without being specific.)

 

Yes, I can move with extreme difficulty, but I don't even want to think about falling down.

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2 hours ago, Buckimion said:

Reminds me of the biddy who wanted to berate me as I was LEAVING a handicapped space. She only stopped when I swung my legs out for her and showed her my prosthetics. Then she still had the nerve to sniff that she had it worse. (Without being specific.)

 

Yes, I can move with extreme difficulty, but I don't even want to think about falling down.

 

I think it is pretty much a disaster when any of us fall. Please do your best to avoid falling. Yes, I know that we do not always have control of things regardless of how hard we try. However, please take care.

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Not all persons with life threatening conditions would need to have a fully accessible cabin just as not all disabled persons would.  HC cabins appear to be designed to accommodate persons who have functional limitations in their ability to perform certain ADLs (Activities of Daily Living). 

 

Basic ADLs are the physical skills needed to manage basic physical needs such as:

  • The ability to walk and transfer in and out of a chair or bed
  • Personal hygiene, oral care and grooming, including skin and hair care
  • Showering and/or bathing
  • Toileting, which includes getting on/off toilet and cleaning oneself
  • Dressing, which includes selecting appropriate attire and putting it on
  • Self-feeding

Source for the above information: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

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Seaburd, I couldn't agree with you more. Excellent resource info.  This is exactly why many of us who have no visible or life threatening issue do book HDC.

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