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I just bought trip insurance!


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1 hour ago, Iamthesea said:

I though you had to purchase trip insurance at or before final payment?

 

No, but some aspects do have time limitations.  If you want to cover pre-existing conditions you usually have to book within 7 to 21 days of booking.  You also can't book trip cancellation/interruption coverage once a storm develops where you are planning to go.  Since I am only getting medical/evacuation coverage, it only covers things in the future, so no real cut off except for before we leave.  It cost $83 plus change for the two of us to add $500K Medical/$500K Evacuation coverage with a GEOBLUE Voyager Essential policy, plus some addition coverage with a $250 deductible.  It is secondary, but once you prove you do not have primary coverage and pay the deductible, it is a direct pay scenario, so no claim forms.

 

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6 hours ago, Boycey said:

I’m intrigued by the different habits either side of the Atlantic.

 

Does the routine health insurance people are obliged to purchase in the US, for example, cover you when abroad? What about extraordinary costs such as helicopter evacuation or medical repatriation? Is that too covered by normal, everyday health insurance?

 

 

Even on our side of the Atlantic, different countries do it differently.

 

Here in the USA it varies greatly depending on each individual's circumstances, so there are no "one size fits all" simple answers to your questions.

 

While we were still working, we always had health insurance from our employers that covered us anywhere in the world. 

But different employers offer different types of health insurance plans.

 

As for retirees, if you opt for basic regular Medicare, that does not cover you traveling outside the USA, so many US retirees prefer to get Medicare Advantage plans that do cover you anywhere in the world.

But the type and amount of coverage does vary from one plan to another, and the different plans have different pros and cons.

Adding to the confusion, different plans are available in different parts of the country.

 

In the fall of every year, the various healthcare providers for senior citizens start hawking their plans for the upcoming year, and it can be a real pain needing to start comparing plans every year as they are always making changes to them. 

 

Also, different doctors are included in different Medicare Advantage plans, so if you change doctors you may need to change your plan (something that happened to me recently).

 

Invariably, one plan will be better for one type of coverage and another plan better for another.  (For example, one plan may offer better prescription drug coverage and another plan better long term care benefits.)

 

As you probably know, this is a very hot topic of debate in the USA right now, with different politicians advocating different types of health care plans, and at this time none of us know what we will eventually end up having.

  

  

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11 hours ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

I suspect your $30,000 bill came largely from the hospital, did your travel insurance or your medical insurance cover the hospital bill?  For medical insurance their are probably better and cheaper ways to get that protection than travel insurance.

 

Good health to you on your future cruises.

I have the kind of Medicare plan that covers a percentage of the cost for non network costs. The rest is my cost, which is where travel insurance comes in handy.

What would a better, cheaper way to get medical protection other than travel insurance?

 

Best of health to you,

Sharon

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We are weeks from retirement, but 10 and 13 years from Medicare eligibility. Thankfully, Hubby is in the last hiring group at his employer to get "Lifetime Medical" which really means we get to keep what we have until we are eligible for Medicare (if it still exists then) and will have supplemental Medicare Advantage coverage in the future. 

 

We use the Chase Sapphire Reserve for our travel costs, and the insurance which comes along with it is quite good. We added a GeoBlue policy this year, as we are starting to travel even more, and my health is very unpredictable. Of course, even an extremely healthy person is subject to accidents. 

 

We did purchase and pay off a Long-Term Care policy when we were in our 30s.  I hope we are too healthy and having too  much fun traveling to ever need it, but it's good to know that it's there, and that our kids won't be burdened if we are ever in a position to have to use it.

 

 

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Have always purchased trip insurance. Have used it twice. 

Once my travel partner became very ill and was hospitalized four days before the cruise. Insurance paid in full.

Last February was preparing to board the ship in FLL, received call that my brother was seriously ill and I immediately went to the airport to return home. My brother passed away three days later. Insurance paid un full and I received a call from the company extending their sympathy.

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Our personal health insurance coverage actually has a "cruise ship event" coverage section for healthcare.  However, we do by a traditional policy from a major carrier that covers much more than that.  Haven't had to use it thank goodness, but is some peace of mind given the $$$ put towards our cruise vacations.

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1 hour ago, Shaco said:

I have the kind of Medicare plan that covers a percentage of the cost for non network costs. The rest is my cost, which is where travel insurance comes in handy.

What would a better, cheaper way to get medical protection other than travel insurance?

 

Best of health to you,

Sharon

 

 

You should really look into a GeoBlue policy.   Medicare plans, I'm not sure about Medicare Advantage, don't cover you outside of the US and don't provide any evacuation benefits.  Supplemental plans are limited to $50k lifetime benefits.  GeoBlue can provide the medical coverage and evacuation benefits at a reasonable cost.

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5 hours ago, Doctor G said:

 

I have used Travel Insured International for USAA members.  They have two policies.  The most expensive one has more coverage and is primary.  The second policy has lower, but still good, coverage.  It is secondary, but you can pay a fee of only $25 to make it a primary coverage policy.  They are not cheap, but I have had good luck with them.  I have had to file a few small claims (medical care onboard) with them, and they have been handled very rapidly.  The cost increases with age.

 

At one time I looked into annual policies, and the ones I reviewed were all secondary coverage. I may have missed some that are primary.  Also, the insurance through Celebrity is secondary, and has very low limits.

 

Carolyn

 

Thank you.  We have used Travel Insured before we started traveling more.  I was thinking about an annual policy when I asked the question.  But good to keep in mind about TI should we need a policy individually.

 

3 hours ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

I purchase the cruise line insurance to cover the cost of the trip for normal events before the cruise and it also offers a form of cancel for any reason if you are willing to accept cruise credits.  For us that's fine.  We are in are 60's and the cruise line insurance is independent of age.  The 3rd party insurance can get expensive, especially for older folks if you want some form of cancel for any reason.

 

For the air fare we self-insure.  We are willing to pay the $200 change fee on the tickets or hope for some good will from the airlines if a problem arises.

 

We also self insure the airfare unless we are flying Business. Then we cover the change fee.   Business to Europe has a high exchange fee.   It's so hard to know what to do.  When we flew to Austraila, we insured the whole tickets because we were not sure we would take that trip, should we have to cancel, within the time limit from when we purchased our flights.

 

3 hours ago, pd7277 said:

 

No, but some aspects do have time limitations.  If you want to cover pre-existing conditions you usually have to book within 7 to 21 days of booking.  You also can't book trip cancellation/interruption coverage once a storm develops where you are planning to go.  Since I am only getting medical/evacuation coverage, it only covers things in the future, so no real cut off except for before we leave.  It cost $83 plus change for the two of us to add $500K Medical/$500K Evacuation coverage with a GEOBLUE Voyager Essential policy, plus some addition coverage with a $250 deductible.  It is secondary, but once you prove you do not have primary coverage and pay the deductible, it is a direct pay scenario, so no claim forms.

 

image.png.42ea8e6cffbf15a1783edc8c12d4684a.png

 

Our Roam Right policy was similar to yours.  But to make a claim, we had to first file with Medicare, and show proof of denial, even though we knew Medicare would not pay.   And Medicare is in no hurry to process claims!  Also, we did not feel that the amount of emergency evacuation was enough.

 

Does anyone know of a primary annual travel insurance policy?

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32 minutes ago, Iamthesea said:

 

Thank you.  We have used Travel Insured before we started traveling more.  I was thinking about an annual policy when I asked the question.  But good to keep in mind about TI should we need a policy individually.

 

 

We also self insure the airfare unless we are flying Business. Then we cover the change fee.   Business to Europe has a high exchange fee.   It's so hard to know what to do.  When we flew to Austraila, we insured the whole tickets because we were not sure we would take that trip, should we have to cancel, within the time limit from when we purchased our flights.

 

 

Our Roam Right policy was similar to yours.  But to make a claim, we had to first file with Medicare, and show proof of denial, even though we knew Medicare would not pay.   And Medicare is in no hurry to process claims!  Also, we did not feel that the amount of emergency evacuation was enough.

 

Does anyone know of a primary annual travel insurance policy?

 

How much Medical Evacuation insurance do you want?  $500,000 seems sufficient to me

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I have always purchased travel insurance, usually about ten to twenty days after we book; that way it covers pre-existing conditions for my elderly father.  So, covering the $900 cruise booking fee costs around $100.  Then, I add to my policy, making sure my items are covered before final payment.  This really helps when booking a NRD cruise, as I have one for this May in Europe.  I have had to use our insurance twice, both times for jewelry.  The second time was so unexpected, as my DH lost his Breitling watch.  The sentimental value will never be recouped...and he refuses to purchase another expensive watch, even for wearing around home. 🗽

Edited by Lastdance
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52 minutes ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

How much Medical Evacuation insurance do you want?  $500,000 seems sufficient to me

 

$500,000 is probably enough, but would prefer the $1,000,000 amount when overseas.  Our annual plan was only for $250,000 evacuation.  Our medical was only $25,000.  

Edited by Iamthesea
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19 hours ago, Fouremco said:

Now we know where YOU found the percentage, but the author of the article is quoting a very dated study based on a very limited online sampling:

 

The 2006 Travel Insurance Consumer Survey was conducted online in late 2005 of 850 people who had taken at least one leisure trip of one night or more in the last 12 months. 

 

Maybe 70% of the 850 respondents were cruisers, but with such a small sampling, it is very hard to extrapolate the findings to even the US cruise community as a whole, let alone cruisers internationally.

 

 

OK .. here's a more current, 2019 source.

 

www.gangwaze.com/blog/cruise-travel-insurance

 

A survey was done to find out what percentage of cruisers buy cruise insurance. It was significantly more than we’d have guessed, at 67%!  That’s over 2 out of every 3 cruisers that opt in to buy coverage.

 

 

 

 

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On 9/6/2019 at 4:42 PM, FlamingJune1967 said:

Yesterday I booked our 10th cruise and today I purchased trip insurance for the first time ever!  I feel so adult right now! 🙂 
I hope I never have to use it, but I just feel like this is a huge "cruising" milestone.  I know insurance is widely recommended on the boards, but I've never met anyone in real life that actually buys it, and I am wondering if this is something that most cruisers do, or just the ones on cruise critic?

 

Really !!!!!!!!! We have been traveling world wide for over 30 years and would NEVER , NEVER, NEVER travel without insurance !!! Find it difficult, especially in this day and age that  travellers would not do so. Maybe its a thing that we, in the UK, just do .  

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I known personally of 2 situations where a cruise was cancelled at the last minute due to health reasons and both times the credit card coverage kicked in and covered up to $10,000 of the cost. 

I don’t have experience/ knowledge with medical problems while overseas. Now that we are on Medicare, I guess I should educate myself. We are “healthy” but stuff happens!

Time to do my research. Thanks for bringing this up. 

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So now, I find this info.  What is the catch?  . Others have said overseas medical is not covered..... Hmmm

Medicare and Medicare Supplement foreign travel coverage plans actually have you covered overseasas well. If you are covered under Medicare Supplement Plans C, D, F, G, M, or N, you will receive foreign travel emergency health care coverage anywhere that is outside the United States.”

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17 hours ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

 

You should really look into a GeoBlue policy.   Medicare plans, I'm not sure about Medicare Advantage, don't cover you outside of the US and don't provide any evacuation benefits.  Supplemental plans are limited to $50k lifetime benefits.  GeoBlue can provide the medical coverage and evacuation benefits at a reasonable cost.

 

I believe Geoblues's evacuation coverage is only to the nearest medical facility qualified to treat your condition; you would only be transported  back home if they determine you cannot be treated adequately where you are. When comparing evacuation benefits, we chose MedJet Assist because it allows us to choose where to be transported if we are hospitalized in any hospital more than 150 miles from home and need continuing hospital care. We want to be in control of our treatment options in the event of an accident or illness.

Of course, the medical coverage in GeoBlue is important if one needs that type of coverage abroad.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, sippican said:

 

I believe Geoblues's evacuation coverage is only to the nearest medical facility qualified to treat your condition; you would only be transported  back home if they determine you cannot be treated adequately where you are. When comparing evacuation benefits, we chose MedJet Assist because it allows us to choose where to be transported if we are hospitalized in any hospital more than 150 miles from home and need continuing hospital care. We want to be in control of our treatment options in the event of an accident or illness.

Of course, the medical coverage in GeoBlue is important if one needs that type of coverage abroad.

 

 

 

We've debated this before.  Even if you have Medjet, you need some sort of Medical coverage when your abroad, Geoblue offers excellent Medical coverage.  There are a lot of conditions that need to be treated immediately before you can be evacuated.  There are plenty of stories where GeoBlue did an excellent job of evacuating people when it was necessary.  If you want to add Medjet to other international Medical coverage, that's great.  But you also need medical coverage when you're traveling.   

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23 minutes ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

We've debated this before.  Even if you have Medjet, you need some sort of Medical coverage when your abroad, Geoblue offers excellent Medical coverage.  There are a lot of conditions that need to be treated immediately before you can be evacuated.  There are plenty of stories where GeoBlue did an excellent job of evacuating people when it was necessary.  If you want to add Medjet to other international Medical coverage, that's great.  But you also need medical coverage when you're traveling.   

I am on Medicare with a supplemental plan.  For my travel needs I too use an annual plan with MedJet as my evacuation insurance and a travel insurance annual plan with Allianz.

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31 minutes ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

We've debated this before.  Even if you have Medjet, you need some sort of Medical coverage when your abroad, Geoblue offers excellent Medical coverage.  There are a lot of conditions that need to be treated immediately before you can be evacuated.  There are plenty of stories where GeoBlue did an excellent job of evacuating people when it was necessary.  If you want to add Medjet to other international Medical coverage, that's great.  But you also need medical coverage when you're traveling.   

I believe my last sentence sums this up nicely.

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44 minutes ago, mafig said:

Am I the only one confused?

 

Me too.  Everyone needs medical insurance for international travel, self insuring for medical expenses overseas can be expensive.  GeoBlue as well as several other insurance companies provide this type of coverage.  Perhaps some people have this coverage through their home health insurance policies.   Most people find Medical evacuation insurance through GeoBlue or another travel insurance company to be adequate.  Some people feel the need for independent evacuation insurance.  That's great for them.  Insuring the cost of your trip with third party insurers can start to be expensive as you get older but that might be the best call depending on your individual conditions.  For me, I use the cruise line insurance for the conventional issues before a cruise and I like the cancel for any reason provisions if you are satisfied with cruise line credits.  It all depends on your individual situation and risk tolerance.

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1 hour ago, mafig said:

Am I the only one confused?

 

It's a complicated and confusing topic!   While it may be true that Medicare supplement plans pay for medical treatment outside the US, it probably won't be like walking into a doctor's office at home, where you hand over your card and you then don't have to pay except for any co-pay.    I suspect that with almost all insurance outside your home country, you'll be expected to pay up front, then submit paperwork to be reimbursed.    I think I'll call my plan (AARP UnitedHealthcare Plan F) tomorrow and try to find out exactly how it would work.    Sounds like this situation is another reason to make sure you always travel with a credit card that has a substantial available credit limit when traveling.   

 

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6 hours ago, fizzy1 said:

Really !!!!!!!!! We have been traveling world wide for over 30 years and would NEVER , NEVER, NEVER travel without insurance !!! Find it difficult, especially in this day and age that  travellers would not do so. Maybe its a thing that we, in the UK, just do .  


Well - we have international medical insurance, never fly, and are pretty low-budget cruisers, so we were willing to take the risk of losing our trip cost.  We've recently increased our travel budget and our parents are getting elderly, so  I felt the time was right.    If our travel had included flights, I would have purchased protection years ago, but we live within driving distance of 8 ports - so we've never had that to contend with.   

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It IS complicated...especially as you AGE!!! We have a "Medicare Advantage Plan" here in the US..which means we are covered world wide...because it is an HMO. BUT...that doesn't cover other expenses when you travel...eg...your spouse is injured/needs to be in the hospital...and you need to stay in a foreign country/fly home etc. with him. and on and on!! MY DH is now 83...and has several "pre=existing conditions" ...which creates an entirely "new" scheme!! And that makes insurance SO expensive...I used to "self insure" ...thinking that it was JUST the cost of the cruise...which we would have spent that $$ anyway...but now...everything that can happen along with an illness over seas...does come into play!! I USED to think that the coverage from my CC company was good..but that does NOT cover pre-existing conditions...and everyone needs to understand that...when you have some of those...it makes a difference!!!  Please check your CC coverage!!

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1 hour ago, Kartgv said:

 

It's a complicated and confusing topic!   While it may be true that Medicare supplement plans pay for medical treatment outside the US, it probably won't be like walking into a doctor's office at home, where you hand over your card and you then don't have to pay except for any co-pay.    I suspect that with almost all insurance outside your home country, you'll be expected to pay up front, then submit paperwork to be reimbursed.    I think I'll call my plan (AARP UnitedHealthcare Plan F) tomorrow and try to find out exactly how it would work.    Sounds like this situation is another reason to make sure you always travel with a credit card that has a substantial available credit limit when traveling.   

 

 

I don't think you will be happy with the response from AARP with your Plan F.  I believe all supplemental plans have a lifetime limit of $50k on medical expenses.  Good luck on getting all of the correct forms and information for your insurance company to reimburse you when all of the forms are in a foreign language.  For me, I want a my health insurance to provide primary coverage and pay the foreign hospitals and doctors directly.  For me GeoBlue serves that purpose.  If you have a problem it's not that much different that dealing with Blue Cross in the US.  Call the 800 number and they can direct you to providers that they work with GeoBlue.   They then send guarantee of payment to those providers.   We had to use it once in London and we were directed to some of the best dentists in London.  I'm sure there are other providers that also work well, but I had a good experience with GeoBlue.  

Edited by ipeeinthepool
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