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5 minutes ago, broberts said:

There is an electronic anti-nausea wrist band. I believe the brand name is reliefband. An internet search should turn up a website with details.

My wife uses it and it works for her.I tried it twice and it did not work for me.

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Just now, lenquixote66 said:

My wife uses it and it works for her.I tried it twice and it did not work for me.

 

That seems to be the norm for any seasickness remedy, works on some people but not others.

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49 minutes ago, broberts said:

 

That seems to be the norm for any seasickness remedy, works on some people but not others.

Absolutely correct,just like many other things.

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I think we can use some more information.  OllieandMissie have not told us whether they are just worried about getting seasick, whether they have been seasick, or what.

 

The scopolamine patch does work, but, as mentioned, does have some side effects.  This is usually the drug of last resort if other forms of OTC medications, etc., do not work.

 

I could get into a lot more information here, but I await some additional background from OllieandMissie.

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Thanks for all your responses. After reading them all and googling some information I’ve decided not to get the scopolamine patches due to them being quite strong with some recognised side effects. My sickness usually only lasts one day whilst crossing the Bay of Biscay and seems to happens every time! I’m fine once we’re through with that part of the journey. I’ve decided just to use sea bands plus those tablets handed out by guest services. Thank-you! 

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16 hours ago, OllieandMissie said:

Thanks for all your responses. After reading them all and googling some information I’ve decided not to get the scopolamine patches due to them being quite strong with some recognised side effects. My sickness usually only lasts one day whilst crossing the Bay of Biscay and seems to happens every time! I’m fine once we’re through with that part of the journey. I’ve decided just to use sea bands plus those tablets handed out by guest services. Thank-you! 

I said earlier that my husband suffers rarely, but yes, it's always been in the BoB! The worst was when he was swimming in the forward pool... 🙄

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16 hours ago, OllieandMissie said:

Thanks for all your responses. After reading them all and googling some information I’ve decided not to get the scopolamine patches due to them being quite strong with some recognised side effects. My sickness usually only lasts one day whilst crossing the Bay of Biscay and seems to happens every time! I’m fine once we’re through with that part of the journey. I’ve decided just to use sea bands plus those tablets handed out by guest services. Thank-you! 

Biscay is known for nasty seas - not so much the size as the erratic pattern which can give a vessel a jerking motion rather than predictable rolling or pitching - which is easier for you senses to adjust for.   If that is the only area you have trouble, just avoid it on itineraries - or at least just eat saltines and tea - with some ginger- and push through.

 

Most people overcome their tendency for seasickness after one or perhaps two experiences - of course if you always medicate yourself, you can make yourself dependent on that medication and never get over it.

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Although, my Mother claimed to have motion sickness issues.  Before every flight, she would take her Dramamine to avoid issues.

 

So, one non-stop IAD - HNL flight, she was happy and fine.  When unpacking at the other end, she found her Dramamine neatly folded in a piece of tissue.  She forgot to take it.  And had no problems.  And never took Dramamine again.   Including sailing on Chesapeake Bay during thunderstorms. 🙂

 

 

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My husband suffered from seasickness in the past.  Due to long standing health issues, there are many drugs he can not tolerate.  No Meclizine, no Dramamine, obviously no patch.  He now puts the sea bands on before boarding the ship.  In the states we can buy an all natural oil, sold over the counter, named Motionease.  other than smelling like a fir tree, this oil is side-effect free.  He puts a drop behind each ear about an hour before boarding.  Since purchasing this product he has avoided

any discomfort. 

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22 hours ago, LittleYiaYia said:

My husband suffered from seasickness in the past.  Due to long standing health issues, there are many drugs he can not tolerate.  No Meclizine, no Dramamine, obviously no patch.  He now puts the sea bands on before boarding the ship.  In the states we can buy an all natural oil, sold over the counter, named Motionease.  other than smelling like a fir tree, this oil is side-effect free.  He puts a drop behind each ear about an hour before boarding.  Since purchasing this product he has avoided

any discomfort. 

 

Agree with Motionease, and I was super skeptic. I use Dramamine with good success, but it makes my husband super drowsey and it's hit or miss if it works for him. The patch gave him really bad side effects. We tried Motionease on the Symphony TA (which had some really rough stormy seas the first few days) and he had no issues at all. 

 

For some reason it's really expensive in our local stores so we've started buying from Amazon. https://amzn.to/30bLFIA

 

I'm still slightly skeptic (it's just an oil that goes behind the ear, how does it work?) but I can't deny the results my husband has experienced

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3 hours ago, awestover89 said:

 

...

 

I'm still slightly skeptic (it's just an oil that goes behind the ear, how does it work?) but I can't deny the results my husband has experienced

Of course a wrist band might raise the same question.  The fact is:  some people experience motion sickness, at least in part, because they have convinced themselves that they will.  And very many people who experience it once or twice learn how to handle motion and get over it (US Navy sailors for example). 

 

If wearing a wrist band, or a drop of oil behind your ear, helps you —- do it.  Your attitude has a great deal to do with it, and something that helps your attitude is good.

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On 9/16/2019 at 6:03 PM, lenquixote66 said:

Meclizine can make one very dizzy.

 

Really? That is the first I've every heard that one. In fact many, if not most,  people who take it also consume alcohol with no ill effects.

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7 minutes ago, zqvol said:

 

Really? That is the first I've every heard that one. In fact many, if not most,  people who take it also consume alcohol with no ill effects.

 

Meclizine does have side effects. They seem to vary quite a bit depending on the user. The last time I took it I could barely keep my eyes open.

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Since "it usually only lasts one day," you are like most other cruisers who get any seasickness -- it goes away in a day, two at the most for those who get seasick. 

 

A couple of hints.  First of all, seasickness is caused by a conflict between the eyes (what we see) and the inner ear (which senses the motion).  So if you are seeing the motion and feeling the motion, there is no conflict.  The solution is to stay on deck and watch the horizon.  Many people need to adjust  a little to the motion.  As you adjust, the ill feeling disappears. 

 

Secondly, eat normal meals.  I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but eat at normal times.  An empty stomach makes you feel worse.  I wouldn't eat greasy foods, but eat something at regular meal times.

 

Probably the majority of people adjust immediately.  Some take a day (maybe two) to get used to the motion.   If it were a problem, people wouldn't go cruising!  Importantly, don't talk yourself into it.   Plan to enjoy yourself, and if you notice that you are taking some time to adjust, realize that it is going to be fine, and take it easy until you feel better.

 

As for me, I have done years of cruising and sailing, and never have a problem until I get on dry land, where it sometimes takes me an hour to realize that I am no longer moving!

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9 hours ago, bbwex said:

Since "it usually only lasts one day," you are like most other cruisers who get any seasickness -- it goes away in a day, two at the most for those who get seasick. 

 

A couple of hints.  First of all, seasickness is caused by a conflict between the eyes (what we see) and the inner ear (which senses the motion).  So if you are seeing the motion and feeling the motion, there is no conflict.  The solution is to stay on deck and watch the horizon.  Many people need to adjust  a little to the motion.  As you adjust, the ill feeling disappears. 

 

Secondly, eat normal meals.  I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but eat at normal times.  An empty stomach makes you feel worse.  I wouldn't eat greasy foods, but eat something at regular meal times.

 

Probably the majority of people adjust immediately.  Some take a day (maybe two) to get used to the motion.   If it were a problem, people wouldn't go cruising!  Importantly, don't talk yourself into it.   Plan to enjoy yourself, and if you notice that you are taking some time to adjust, realize that it is going to be fine, and take it easy until you feel better.

 

As for me, I have done years of cruising and sailing, and never have a problem until I get on dry land, where it sometimes takes me an hour to realize that I am no longer moving!

Great advice - you realize, of course that you are putting yourself at risk:  the makers of oils, patches, pills  and bands who owe their livelihood to making people believe that only by regular and continued use of such products can they possibly enjoy cruising do not like such revelations.

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Navybankerteacher,, I would hate to cut in on the profits of big Pharma and others.  Golly, Gee!  How do all of those sailors on small ships ever survive? 

 

For those who never served in the Navy, almost all Navy ships are much, much smaller than cruise ships.  They may be designed a bit more for riding the seas, but they still move a whole lot.  Lots of the men serving on those ships never see the horizon for days at a time.  The answer is that your body adjusts. 

 

All of those who first came to this country came on ships that were less than 200' feet long,  and less than 20' wide.  Can you imagine those  little corks bouncing on the seas?  AND they were dreadfully slow so it wasn't four days from Europe to here. And they made it.

 

I am not saying that most seasickness is mental -- it is real for many people, but you will get over it.  Don't worry about it.  Relax.  Take some ordinary precautions until you have gotten used to the motion, and enjoy the trip.  I, for one, actually enjoy the motion, but others don't enjoy it that much.  But, by and large, you will get used to it quickly and learn that that is part of the fun of a cruise.  Don't talk yourself into being sick. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, bbwex said:

First of all, seasickness is caused by a conflict between the eyes (what we see) and the inner ear (which senses the motion).

 

The fact that blind people experience "seasickness" disproves this statement. There is no single cause for all cases of "seasickness". 

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OK, seasickness is GENERALLY caused by a conflict between the eyes and inner ear.  I shall amend my comments in the future.

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4 hours ago, broberts said:

 

The fact that blind people experience "seasickness" disproves this statement. There is no single cause for all cases of "seasickness". 

Actually, it supports the statement as they feel the motion but are unable to see it--thus the conflict. Same as if you mistakenly think you should lie down and close your eyes when feeling the motion. Only makes it worse.

But yes, there is no single cause for all cases.

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5 hours ago, bbwex said:

I am not saying that most seasickness is mental -- it is real for many people, but you will get over it.  Don't worry about it.  Relax.  Take some ordinary precautions until you have gotten used to the motion, and enjoy the trip.  I, for one, actually enjoy the motion, but others don't enjoy it that much.  But, by and large, you will get used to it quickly and learn that that is part of the fun of a cruise.  Don't talk yourself into being sick. 

Horse hockey. Just because motion sickness isn't a problem for you means nothing to the larger population.  If self acclimation was a given then there would be no such thing as chronic motion sickness, and there would be no need for the extensive amount of research into the condition ( both military and civilian). To say that sailors dont get seasick is simply false. There are more than a few that have to be relieved of sea duty because of it. Similarly there are people who are very susceptible to motion sickness from many sources (cars, planes, boats, amusement rides). Telling them it will go away in a couple of days MAY be true for some, but it may be impossible for others. Making blanket statements like this is simply misleading.

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1 hour ago, 2wheelin said:

Actually, it supports the statement as they feel the motion but are unable to see it--thus the conflict.

 

I have rarely seen such twisted and fallacious logic. Were it accurate it would suggest that blind people are always seasick when moving since they "are unable to see it".

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2 minutes ago, broberts said:

 

I have rarely seen such twisted and fallacious logic. Were it accurate it would suggest that blind people are always seasick when moving since they "are unable to see it".

Your suggestion then would be like saying everyone gets seasick when they go to bed and close their eyes.

It might have been easier to grasp if the original statement had said "conflict between the eyes (what you see OR DON"T SEE)" and the inner ear. Obviously not everyone feels that conflict.

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2 hours ago, mom says said:

Horse hockey. Just because motion sickness isn't a problem for you means nothing to the larger population.  If self acclimation was a given then there would be no such thing as chronic motion sickness, and there would be no need for the extensive amount of research into the condition ( both military and civilian). To say that sailors dont get seasick is simply false. There are more than a few that have to be relieved of sea duty because of it. Similarly there are people who are very susceptible to motion sickness from many sources (cars, planes, boats, amusement rides). Telling them it will go away in a couple of days MAY be true for some, but it may be impossible for others. Making blanket statements like this is simply misleading.

Yes, some Navy sailors never adjust - but the fact is a significant number (certainly a majority) do experience sea sickness their first encounter with rough weather - and do in fact overcome it.  The sailors who do overcome it by aclimatizing are, in fact,  the “larger population” you refer to.

 

Wearing a wrist band certainly helps some people;  and placebo effect being as powerful as it has been shown to be, it is likely that tight-fitting socks might very well do the same - given enough hype. 

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what a hostile thread.  😞

as someone said, different meds work for different people.

if dramamine or meclizine are not available in your country, can they be mail ordered?

or can you buy them at your first or second port stop?

my granddaughter is quite prone to motion sickness and she takes along a lot of ginger chews (candy with real ginger in it). for me, the taste alone would probably make me barf!!  LOL!

dh uses wrist bands - i find them painful - that point hurts!!

they tell pregnant women in the usa to chew on saltines - can't hurt - might help??

just do a google serch and bring along a variety of things you think might work.

and bring your patch too - as a last resort. it obviously works for some people.

good luck!!

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