Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
wkrobi

Carnival funnel question

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Does Carnivals ships use both sides of the funnel smokestacks for the propulsion engine exhaust? I did a search and couldn't find find the answer. The only thing I found is that the stacks are used for many things, deisel engines, generators and other equipment. 

Edited by wkrobi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the smoke you see are from fuel powered generators. The actual drive motors for the ship are electric. Beyond that, the true marine experts will answer.
 Take a Behind The Scenes Tour, you will love it.

 

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, BallFour4 said:

All the smoke you see are from fuel powered generators. The actual drive motors for the ship are electric. Beyond that, the true marine experts will answer.
 Take a Behind The Scenes Tour, you will love it.

 

.

I agree about the Behind the Fun tour being informative but it doesn't cover the engine room (unless it's changed recently). It does however go to the engine control room where a question like this can be asked of the engineers on duty and I'm sure they will answer.

Where's our friend Chief (chengkp75) on this??  :classic_smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a question that never would have occurred to me, but now I need the answer because I can almost guarantee my 9yo will ask it 😂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've taken the behind the fun tour a few times and I do remember them saying the "pipe" in the funnel runs from the bottom all the way to the top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, joepeka said:

I agree about the Behind the Fun tour being informative but it doesn't cover the engine room (unless it's changed recently). It does however go to the engine control room where a question like this can be asked of the engineers on duty and I'm sure they will answer.

Where's our friend Chief (chengkp75) on this??  :classic_smile:

It hasn't changed and you are right. The Control Room is what the tour gets to see.
I'm sure Chief will chime in. One day I might see him running to the East Jetties here in Galveston bay for trout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting question. I have spent some time watching the funnel and I believe the real stack ends and the exhaust can exit either left or right, but just my opinion.  I can tell you behind the scene tour will not answer the question as part of the tour,  but you can ask.  We did get to go into the engine control room, which was cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BallFour4 said:

All the smoke you see are from fuel powered generators. The actual drive motors for the ship are electric. Beyond that, the true marine experts will answer.
 Take a Behind The Scenes Tour, you will love it.

 

.

 

But all that electricity for the drive motors is generated by huge diesel engines which produce the smoke up the funnel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, glrounds said:

 

But all that electricity for the drive motors is generated by huge diesel engines which produce the smoke up the funnel.

Well.. we are saying the same thing. They are huge diesel generators producing electricity.

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my best guess is that one side of the smoke stack is used for the ships engines and the other smoke stack is for ventilation or for other machinery like hvac, dryer exhaust, gallery stove exhaust and other things

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have seen smoke coming from both sides simultaneously. 

 

Picture worth 1000 words:

 

enhanceEM

Edited by Essiesmom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could be wrong but don't they have incinerators on the ships to burn waste.  Seems like I've seen on those shows about mega ships that they do incinerate waste.  Maybe that's what the other side is used for. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i know others will have a more detailed answer, but there are several generators on board, IIRC the tour I took mentioned 6 total. They do not use or need all six at any one time, but may perform maintenance   and have others as backup. Saying that, I believe the answer is some of the six exhaust out of one side, the rest from the other. You can hear the air intake on the aft top deck, at least on the larger ships with the running track near the aft of the ship.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ship has several diesel generators, and these are spread across the width of the ship.  For instance, if the ship has 6 diesel generators, there will be one engine room with engines #1-3 going from port to starboard, and another engine room with engines #4-6 again going from port to starboard.  Those engines on the port side, regardless of engine room, will exhaust on the port side of the funnel, and vice versa for the engines on the starboard side.  The centerline engines will likely both exhaust on one side, as there will also be two boilers in the engine room, and these are typically both on one side, so they will exhaust on the opposite side of the funnel to the centerline diesels.  There will also be one or two incinerators that will exhaust up there as well, the side of the funnel depending on where the incinerators are located.

 

As for smoke from one side or the other, and whether the smoke is from the "propulsion engines" as the OP asked, as stated, the propulsion is by electric motor.  Depending on how fast the ship is going will determine how many diesel generators are needed to supply the power to these electric motors.  Very commonly, there are two different sized diesel generators on the ship (say 3 of each size) to allow flexibility in matching generating capacity to load demand.  So, between the varying demand (so varying number of engines and which engines) and which engines need maintenance, there may be only engines that exhaust on one side of the funnel running, or the other side, or both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, shof515 said:

my best guess is that one side of the smoke stack is used for the ships engines and the other smoke stack is for ventilation or for other machinery like hvac, dryer exhaust, gallery stove exhaust and other things

HVAC vents are large grilles you see around the ship, either on the hull, or on the superstructure, typically above the upper passenger decks.  Dryer exhausts commonly exit through the hollow foremast.  Galley exhausts will also exit above the upper passenger decks.   Engine room exhaust fans that take the hot air from the upper regions of the engine room will exhaust into the funnel structure, and there will be louvers or grilles to allow this out of the funnel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a related note, here is an interview with Joe Farcus where he talks all about the design of the whale tale. It wasn’t just about aesthetics; the design is functional as well. I don’t recall if he talks about the smoke coming out specifically, but it’s an interesting interview nonetheless. 

 

http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/6/5/e/65e8dffccf80871b/CRR07JUL2119.mp3?c_id=47739194&cs_id=47739194&expiration=1570277765&hwt=70b2e2472003935d1ef445345e531229

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just glad that progress is being made in cleaning up the exhaust.  When I first started sailing back in 2003, heavy particles of soot would belch out and litter the aft portions of the ship.

 

Now I don't see heavy black smoke while the ship is in US and most Caribbean ports, but do notice it while in international waters.  Does a ship switch the types of diesel fuel used depending on local environmental laws?  Say low sulphur fuel in ports and cheaper, heavy sulphur diesel when at sea? How about the scrubbers used to clean the exhaust?   Do they operate full or part time?

 

I realize a clear visual doesn't indicate that all particulates are removed, but that black sooty smoke exhaust was/still is awful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, evandbob said:

I'm just glad that progress is being made in cleaning up the exhaust.  When I first started sailing back in 2003, heavy particles of soot would belch out and litter the aft portions of the ship.

 

Now I don't see heavy black smoke while the ship is in US and most Caribbean ports, but do notice it while in international waters.  Does a ship switch the types of diesel fuel used depending on local environmental laws?  Say low sulphur fuel in ports and cheaper, heavy sulphur diesel when at sea? How about the scrubbers used to clean the exhaust?   Do they operate full or part time?

 

I realize a clear visual doesn't indicate that all particulates are removed, but that black sooty smoke exhaust was/still is awful.

There are different requirements when not in international waters. Carnival installed scrubbers on the exhaust a couple years back.  I am sure our local expert can opine on specifics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, bakersdozen12 said:

On a related note, here is an interview with Joe Farcus where he talks all about the design of the whale tale. It wasn’t just about aesthetics; the design is functional as well. I don’t recall if he talks about the smoke coming out specifically, but it’s an interesting interview nonetheless. 

 

http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/6/5/e/65e8dffccf80871b/CRR07JUL2119.mp3?c_id=47739194&cs_id=47739194&expiration=1570277765&hwt=70b2e2472003935d1ef445345e531229

The winged funnels were first used on the SS France (later SS Norway) The wings enabled the exhaust to blow outwards into the ship's slipstream and carried away from the decks below. It's was really good idea and sort of unique at the time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, evandbob said:

I'm just glad that progress is being made in cleaning up the exhaust.  When I first started sailing back in 2003, heavy particles of soot would belch out and litter the aft portions of the ship.

 

Now I don't see heavy black smoke while the ship is in US and most Caribbean ports, but do notice it while in international waters.  Does a ship switch the types of diesel fuel used depending on local environmental laws?  Say low sulphur fuel in ports and cheaper, heavy sulphur diesel when at sea? How about the scrubbers used to clean the exhaust?   Do they operate full or part time?

 

I realize a clear visual doesn't indicate that all particulates are removed, but that black sooty smoke exhaust was/still is awful.

When any ship is within the North American ECA (emission control area), which extends 200 miles from US/Canada shoreline (except where another country's territorial waters interfere, like the Bahamas, where the ECA narrows down to half the distance between shores), around Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, all ships must either burn low sulfur fuel (0.1% sulfur) or use an exhaust gas scrubber (any fuel can be used when a scrubber is installed, even the current 3.5% sulfur residual fuel).  Outside of this ECA (or one of the other ECA's (North Sea, Baltic, Antarctic, and all EU ports), ships can burn 3.5% sulfur fuel.  Now, sulfur content does not indicate the amount of soot or particulate matter that an engine emits.  Older engines continue to operate under their IMO "tier level" for allowable emissions, while newer engines must meet higher tier level requirements.  Burning diesel fuel (currently the only fuel able to meet the 0.1% sulfur content) makes it much easier to limit the visible particulate matter since the combustion tends to be more complete.  Scrubbers wash the particulates out of the exhaust, so reducing the emissions from residual fuel.

 

Typically, given the emission requirements to date, scrubbers will be bypassed when outside the ECA, due to cost of operation.  As of January 1st next year, worldwide sulfur limits for marine fuel drop from 3.5% to 0.5% (an 85% reduction), so until lower sulfur residual fuel becomes more available, and/or its price drops, the scrubbers may well be used full time.

 

I am not sure if Carnival has completed installation of scrubbers all across the fleet, and on all engines on every ship.

Edited by chengkp75

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, chengkp75 said:

 

 

I am not sure if Carnival has completed installation of scrubbers all across the fleet, and on all engines on every ship.

 

 

Speaking of scrubbers, do you know how they were installed within the existing Carnival funnel enclosure?  The reason I ask this is because on other cruise lines, it's usually pretty obvious which ships have had the scrubbers installed.  On the Oasis & Freedom Class for instance there is actually a 3rd set of exhaust pipes installed and you can clearly see them as one of the funnels is enlarged to enclose them.  I don't think the average person would notice as they have done a good job of concealing them, but the funnels are no longer symmetrical.  

 

With Carnival, the single exhaust enclosure (smoke stack) is fairly narrow and almost completely enclosed.  Plus the wings.  I wasn't sure how they could install the scrubbers within that structure, and I haven't seen any examples of where the funnel was altered to house the additional exhaust piping needed for the scrubbers.  Just thought you might have some insight.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, eroller said:

 

 

Speaking of scrubbers, do you know how they were installed within the existing Carnival funnel enclosure?  The reason I ask this is because on other cruise lines, it's usually pretty obvious which ships have had the scrubbers installed.  On the Oasis & Freedom Class for instance there is actually a 3rd set of exhaust pipes installed and you can clearly see them as one of the funnels is enlarged to enclose them.  I don't think the average person would notice as they have done a good job of concealing them, but the funnels are no longer symmetrical.  

 

With Carnival, the single exhaust enclosure (smoke stack) is fairly narrow and almost completely enclosed.  Plus the wings.  I wasn't sure how they could install the scrubbers within that structure, and I haven't seen any examples of where the funnel was altered to house the additional exhaust piping needed for the scrubbers.  Just thought you might have some insight.   

There are two designs of scrubbers, single engine and multiple engine.  RCI has gone the multiple engine route, where two or three engines all exhaust into the same scrubber.  NCL has gone the single engine route, not sure which way Carnival has gone.  The single engine scrubber basically replaces the "silencer" (sort of a muffler) in-line in the exhaust pipe, so I think maybe Carnival has gone this route, though they may have space in the superstructure below the funnel itself to install a multiple engine scrubber.  There are pros and cons to each type.  The single engine one is cheaper, per unit, and is designed to be operated "dry" (no scrubber water when outside the ECA), and takes up very little footprint.  The multiple engine one is probably cheaper overall, since the ancillary equipment (pumps, chemical dosing, particulate filtering) is common for multiple engines, but it requires bypass valves in the exhaust pipes to physically bypass the scrubber when not in use, and these can be problematic for maintenance 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Q&A: Cruise Insurance with Steve Dasseos of TripInsuranceStore.com
      • Holiday Exchange - Jingle and Mingle 2019
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...