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Passover and Easter

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As far as heating Kosher food in a "non-Koser" oven:  At one of my hotels that once hosted one of those large Kosher holiday vacation groups, we set aside ovens in the kitchen as the "Kosher" ovens.  The local rabbi came by to "kasher" them - it had to do with firing them up to something like 500 degrees for a certain amount of time.  It was then considered OK for kosher preparation.   And, we took one of the suites "off market" and had the rabbi kasher the kitchen and put in new kitchenware so that people in the group could "cook" if they wanted...

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13 minutes ago, slidergirl said:

As far as heating Kosher food in a "non-Koser" oven:  At one of my hotels that once hosted one of those large Kosher holiday vacation groups, we set aside ovens in the kitchen as the "Kosher" ovens.  The local rabbi came by to "kasher" them - it had to do with firing them up to something like 500 degrees for a certain amount of time.  It was then considered OK for kosher preparation.   And, we took one of the suites "off market" and had the rabbi kasher the kitchen and put in new kitchenware so that people in the group could "cook" if they wanted...

 

 

There is a distinction between kosher and 'kosher for Passover.   It'  is  so great to read the effort The Ritz went to,  goes to)  preparing the hotel  in order to provide a good Passover experience for their guests.

Edited by sail7seas

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2 minutes ago, sail7seas said:

 

 

There is a distinction between kosher and 'kosher for Passover'.

 

 

Yes, I know that.  I was discussing the kashering of an oven for a one-time use of a group.  

If you go to oukosher.org and look at "The Modern Kitchen", it will show a very few items which need to have special kashering for Passover vs "regular" kosher.

That was how we were able to outfit the suite's kitchen for the Passover use.  We are lucky to have a local Orthodox rabbi who is an expert in kashering.  He was the in-house rabbi at a glatt kosher fine dining restaurant here,  He was in that kitchen every day, inspecting each leaf of lettuce, observing prep work to ensure the entire process was up to standards.  

 

NO, I'm not Jewish.  But, somehow I have been designated the "jewish rules" person at work.  Probably because we all got some good training at my old hotel who was owned by an Orthodox Jew - we were taught rules of "engagement" with Orthodox guests, locks and lights and elevators, where to find the Sabbath clock online for our area, things like that.  Customs and traditions fascinate me, so I really got into it.  

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10 minutes ago, slidergirl said:

Yes, I know that.  I was discussing the kashering of an oven for a one-time use of a group.  

If you go to oukosher.org and look at "The Modern Kitchen", it will show a very few items which need to have special kashering for Passover vs "regular" kosher.

That was how we were able to outfit the suite's kitchen for the Passover use.  We are lucky to have a local Orthodox rabbi who is an expert in kashering.  He was the in-house rabbi at a glatt kosher fine dining restaurant here,  He was in that kitchen every day, inspecting each leaf of lettuce, observing prep work to ensure the entire process was up to standards.  

 

NO, I'm not Jewish.  But, somehow I have been designated the "jewish rules" person at work.  Probably because we all got some good training at my old hotel who was owned by an Orthodox Jew - we were taught rules of "engagement" with Orthodox guests, locks and lights and elevators, where to find the Sabbath clock online for our area, things like that.  Customs and traditions fascinate me, so I really got into it.  

 

 

You, do, indeed seem to be very knowledgeable re: preparing for Passover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, sail7seas said:

 

 

You, do, indeed seem to be very knowledgeable re: preparing for Passover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'll do what I should do for all of my guests... They are in "my home" and I want to make them feel welcome.  My local synagogue and the rabbi are very open to me calling and asking questions.  

Even when Hanukkah coincides with Christmas, I lobby to get some blue and silver decorations.  And, I am in charge of the Hanukkah menorah.  The local rabbi showed me the proper way/order to light the menorah each night.  Last year, I had a gentleman and his 2 boys ask if there was a place they could do their own observance.  I offer the area at my desk, since I could watch the candles until they burned out.  They did their "thing" that night and I just observed quietly.  The next night, they came down and insisted I join in.  The gentleman got the rest of the family on FaceTime and we had a joint celebration with both places lighting candles.  I was introduced to the rest of the family and they took photos of me with the gentleman, the boys, and the rest on the iPad.  They sent them to me.  When they left, they left me their menorah.  I was honored.   Not too bad for a Protestant...

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1 hour ago, slidergirl said:

I'll do what I should do for all of my guests... They are in "my home" and I want to make them feel welcome.  My local synagogue and the rabbi are very open to me calling and asking questions.  

Even when Hanukkah coincides with Christmas, I lobby to get some blue and silver decorations.  And, I am in charge of the Hanukkah menorah.  The local rabbi showed me the proper way/order to light the menorah each night.  Last year, I had a gentleman and his 2 boys ask if there was a place they could do their own observance.  I offer the area at my desk, since I could watch the candles until they burned out.  They did their "thing" that night and I just observed quietly.  The next night, they came down and insisted I join in.  The gentleman got the rest of the family on FaceTime and we had a joint celebration with both places lighting candles.  I was introduced to the rest of the family and they took photos of me with the gentleman, the boys, and the rest on the iPad.  They sent them to me.  When they left, they left me their menorah.  I was honored.   Not too bad for a Protestant...

 

That is so lovely.  It is most kind you shared  that experience with us.    I  t ruly enjoyed fixing an image o f you,   the gentleman and sons and rest of their family in my mind..     THAT is the kindness and the goodness of the human being  at our best.  You most certainly do belong working in a hospitality  position

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1 hour ago, sail7seas said:

 

That is so lovely.  It is most kind you shared  that experience with us.    I  t ruly enjoyed fixing an image o f you,   the gentleman and sons and rest of their family in my mind..     THAT is the kindness and the goodness of the human being  at our best.  You most certainly do belong working in a hospitality  position

Thank you, sail.  My two best moments have to do with interactions with Orthodox Jews.  That moment with the family doing the cross-country candle lighting was definitely a highlight.  My favorite guest was Mr. Meyer, a 6'5" Orthodox Hassidic "penguin" (a term of endearment - he wore the whole black & white and hat and the peyote) from Brooklyn.  He was also a rabid snowboarder. If we were scheduled to get a  big dump of snow, I could always count on seeing a reservation for him come in.  I knew he didn't like apples that we always had out.  I asked one day what fruit he did like. When he said "oranges", I always made sure I stopped off and got a few organic oranges to put on a plate to give to him at arrival.  I was always careful to not touch his hands when we exchanged things - it is frowned on for a woman to shake hands with a man.   When he went to snowboard, no one would have a clue that he was Hassidic - he looked like every other rider on the mountain!

 

That's why I think any ship or hotel should be able  easily accommodate a special religious meal IF they are asked in advance.  It's not like they are doing it every day.  At those times where the holidays are celebrated at the same time, both should be celebrated.  JMHO

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 The issue is we Jews have so many different levls of faith it makes it difficult for a non jew to get it correct. I am "orthodox" as regards kosher food but will ride on the sabbath . My wifes ithe opposite!!!! Love the Chassidic term penquin in the UK not heard that one

 

I think it is difficult area but thank you for making the effort to accomodate us - i promise you we really apppreciate it when others help us with what must seem like "mad" customs 🙂

Edited by Mr Maverick

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8 hours ago, Mr Maverick said:

 The issue is we Jews have so many different levls of faith it makes it difficult for a non jew to get it correct. I am "orthodox" as regards kosher food but will ride on the sabbath . My wifes ithe opposite!!!! Love the Chassidic term penquin in the UK not heard that one

 

I think it is difficult area but thank you for making the effort to accommodate us - i promise you we really  it when others help us with what must seem like "mad" customs 🙂

I can't remember where I learned "penguin" for a Hassidic gentleman, but it is just a term of endearment. Also, I meant "peyot" and not "peyote" - friggin' autocorrect...

 

Our local synagogue is aligned Reformed, but since it's the only one within 30 miles, it tries to be "ecumenical".   The "big city" down from us does have a Chabad House and it's rabbi is the one who we call on for kashering.  

 

Question for you, Mr Maverick: what do you do about door locks when you cruise and end up onboard on the Sabbath?  Do ships do any kind of accommodation like temporarily disabling the lock?  Do you make arrangements with the steward to not clean the cabin (as you would be making someone work on your behalf on the Sabbath)?  Do you bring some plug-in night lights so you don't have to turn on room lights on and leave them on?  All those little things that people may not realize you have to do if you go "by the rules" when traveling.   

At my old hotel owned by the Orthodox gentleman - the glatt kosher restaurant was a mile from the hotel.  It also housed a schul for guests.  What the hotel did to allow guests to get to the restaurant and schul - we had wires strung between the hotel and the other location, virtually expanding the "home."  We had a rabbi do whatever he needed to do to certify it.  We added some of those little solar lights along part of walkway to have it lit at night.  We also had a basket of safety vests that a guest to take one so they would be visible to traffic when walking at night.   Things one can do when they own the hotel AND the ski resort!

 

I'm all for doing what I can for any guest.  But, I will say I will draw the line at large Indian weddings - if they are like one I saw at the Fairmont Newport  Beach, they brought in AN ELEPHANT!!!!

 

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32 minutes ago, slidergirl said:

 

I can't remember where I learned "penguin" for a Hassidic gentleman, but it is just a term of endearment. Also, I meant "peyot" and not "peyote" - friggin' autocorrect...

 

Our local synagogue is aligned Reformed, but since it's the only one within 30 miles, it tries to be "ecumenical".   The "big city" down from us does have a Chabad House and it's rabbi is the one who we call on for kashering.  

 

Question for you, Mr Maverick: what do you do about door locks when you cruise and end up onboard on the Sabbath?  Do ships do any kind of accommodation like temporarily disabling the lock?  Do you make arrangements with the steward to not clean the cabin (as you would be making someone work on your behalf on the Sabbath)?  Do you bring some plug-in night lights so you don't have to turn on room lights on and leave them on?  All those little things that people may not realize you have to do if you go "by the rules" when traveling.   

At my old hotel owned by the Orthodox gentleman - the glatt kosher restaurant was a mile from the hotel.  It also housed a schul for guests.  What the hotel did to allow guests to get to the restaurant and schul - we had wires strung between the hotel and the other location, virtually expanding the "home."  We had a rabbi do whatever he needed to do to certify it.  We added some of those little solar lights along part of walkway to have it lit at night.  We also had a basket of safety vests that a guest to take one so they would be visible to traffic when walking at night.   Things one can do when they own the hotel AND the ski resort!

 

I'm all for doing what I can for any guest.  But, I will say I will draw the line at large Indian weddings - if they are like one I saw at the Fairmont Newport  Beach, they brought in AN ELEPHANT!!!!

 

Great question and love the Elephant.

 

I do not align myself or does my wife to US American reform Judaism -. No problem with it but it does have more leniency,

 

Door locks - exactly what they do in Israel I am given a manual key and use that.

Lights - problem but a time switch  and some portable lights does the trick 

Sabbath Candles - problems 

Elevator my wife works off the pounds on Shabbat on the stairs 🙂

 

Remember for us Shabbat is digital detox for us. so anything else is not relevant.

 

You know to us its part of the routine but you sound like a fantastic person.

 

We met a Jewish AHD on another cruise line and we had a ball - he was not orthodox but by the time we got off he had made arrangements to go to Chabad and  find his roots. He even changed his name to his Jewish original name.

 

Chabad are truly the most amazing people non judgemental and fun people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Mr Maverick

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1 minute ago, Mr Maverick said:

Great question and love the Elephant.

 

I do align my self or does my wife to US American reform Judaism -. No problem with it but it does have more leniency,

 

Door locks - exactly what they do in Israel I am given a manual key and use that.

Lights - problem but a time switch  and some portable lights does the trick 

Sabbath Candles - problems 

Elevator my wife works off the pounds on Shabbat on the stairs 🙂

 

Remember for us Shabbat is digital detox for us. so anything else is not relevant.

 

You know to us its part of the routine but you sound like a fantastic person.

 

We met a Jewish AHD on another cruise line and we had a ball - he was not orthodox but by the time we got off he had made arrangements to go to Chabad and  find his roots. He even changed his name to his Jewish original name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you.  I'm a sociologist by my university education, and I am fascinated by customs and traditions.  As part of my History of the Jews class, I was involved in developing the first large-scale survey of the Los Angeles Jewish community back in the 70s.   I still remember one of the questions: "I am moved by the sound of the shofar."   My now-ex and I actually bought a Kudu shofar when we were in Jerusalem.  We stayed at the Dan Tel Aviv - I remember the Sabbath clocks that were available at the Front Desk and that breakfast on the Sabbath was different from other mornings - no made-to-order stations, squeeze your own OJ instead of the person squeezing for you.  I don't remember door keys.   Hmm.  With the "new" hotels having just the electronic locks (or even being able to use your phone as your key), do you just ask for it to be disabled?  

 

I don't mean to hijack, but some others who may cruise (tying it back in) may be curious about little things that the observant do.  You may be old-school Catholic and only eat Fish on Fridays - easy on a ship.  But, Kosher law is something I find fascinating and respect anyone who tries to adhere to the law and not intrude on others...

 

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13 minutes ago, slidergirl said:

Thank you.  I'm a sociologist by my university education, and I am fascinated by customs and traditions.  As part of my History of the Jews class, I was involved in developing the first large-scale survey of the Los Angeles Jewish community back in the 70s.   I still remember one of the questions: "I am moved by the sound of the shofar."   My now-ex and I actually bought a Kudu shofar when we were in Jerusalem.  We stayed at the Dan Tel Aviv - I remember the Sabbath clocks that were available at the Front Desk and that breakfast on the Sabbath was different from other mornings - no made-to-order stations, squeeze your own OJ instead of the person squeezing for you.  I don't remember door keys.   Hmm.  With the "new" hotels having just the electronic locks (or even being able to use your phone as your key), do you just ask for it to be disabled?  

 

I don't mean to hijack, but some others who may cruise (tying it back in) may be curious about little things that the observant do.  You may be old-school Catholic and only eat Fish on Fridays - easy on a ship.  But, Kosher law is something I find fascinating and respect anyone who tries to adhere to the law and not intrude on others...

 

Hi All door locks have an emergency key behind a cover plate

 

The Shofar is haunting and brings me to tears every time I hear it. It brings us back together. Kol Shofar "the voice of the Shofar" is a powerful today as it was over 5,000 years ago

 

Kosher law is amazing a for us it is a way of life the world over. I must dash as we now have a festival starting but I did not want to ignore you.

 

We tend to be reserved on the sabbath and have the morning service and hope to be able to find ten Jewish men (a minyan) to be able to read the law and say Kaddish - memorial prayers so important to us

 

Cruise is easyish just takes some planning and a great crew to help facilitate our weird habits!

 

Dan Tel Aviv is a hotel I know well. Its is still one of the best and expensive! 

 

May we be blessed to have people like you in the world.

Edited by Mr Maverick

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4 minutes ago, Mr Maverick said:

Hi All door locks have an emergency key behind a cover plate

 

The Shofar is haunting and brings me to tears every time I hear it. It brings us back together. Kol Shofar "the voice of the Shofar" is a powerful today as it was over 5,000 years ago

 

Kosher law is amazing a for us it is a way of life the world over. I must dash as we now have a festival starting but I did not want to ignore you.

 

We tend to be reserved on the sabbath and have the morning service and hope to be able to find ten Jewish men (a minyan) to be able to read the law and say Kaddish - memorial prayers so important to us

 

Cruise is easyish just takes some planning and a great crew to help facilitate our weird habits!

 

May we be blessed to have people like you in the world.

Thank you,

 

Happy Shemeni Atzeret/Simchat Torah!!!  

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On 10/20/2019 at 9:38 PM, slidergirl said:

Thank you,

 

Happy Shemeni Atzeret/Simchat Torah!!!  

Thanks had a ball!! lovely kind wish 

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