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We're reading up on our Cape Horn adventure! So excited, and didn't realized the complex history with Magellan, Drake, etc. What is Oceania's usual route? Will there be an opportunity to see Cape Horn? I expect that even under the best of circumstances, we won't be able to land on the island.

 

Mia

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21 minutes ago, marylovestotravel said:

We're reading up on our Cape Horn adventure! So excited, and didn't realized the complex history with Magellan, Drake, etc. What is Oceania's usual route? Will there be an opportunity to see Cape Horn? I expect that even under the best of circumstances, we won't be able to land on the island.

 

Mia

You're Oceania invoice has your planned stops and their order of arrivals. Compare that to a map and you'll come close to figuring out the "route." 

Not knowing when or what ship your "adventure" in Patagonia will be, I can't help you beyond saying that you can usually expect Ushuaia, Punta Arenas and cruising the Chilean fjords (best part of the cruise).  

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Way back when -- before Oceania came into existence -- we were on an NCL cruise from Buenos Aires to Santiago.  We did go to Cape Horn --- and the weather was gorgeous that day.  But no, we did NOT land on shore.

 

If I'm remembering correctly -- always questionable -- you can go on land on some of the "expedition" cruises, but I don't think any of the bigger ships permit that.  And maybe that is because THEY aren't permitted to take passengers on shore.

 

But it's a wonderful view. 

048 Cape Horn T.jpg

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We sailed around Cape Horn four years ago on Celebrity Infinity. The seas were so rough that the Cruise Director suggested that passengers stay in their cabins. We didn't stay in our cabin and laughed like children as we bounced around the ship. We weren't alone but some folks didn't share our sense of humor. We could see the outline of the shore but that's about it. We were told that the weather two weeks prior to our trip was perfect. No matter what the weather, It's an amazing experience.

 

Having said all that, we will sail around Cape Horn aboard Marina on the Buenos Aires - Miami itinerary in December - January.

 

I agree with @Flatbush Flyer's comment about the Chilean Fjords. Beautiful.

 

 

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Weather is changeable as we all know.  We had great weather both at Cape Horn and the Falklands, but the cruise just before us couldn't go on shore because the seas were so bad.  They were there maybe two-three days before we were.

 

Mura

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2 hours ago, Rob the Cruiser said:

...we will sail around Cape Horn aboard Marina on the Buenos Aires - Miami itinerary in December - January.

 

 

Rob, I didn't realize we were sailing together in December.  Hope that our paths cross along the way.

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We were on a cruise that went to Cape Horn a number of years ago in mid-March. That is some of the roughest water in the world and the weather can change very quickly. It was a clear, sunny day and everyone was excited about going onshore.  They were telling us to be ready to go if and when the captain gave the go-ahead but unfortunately, the decision was made that the water was too rough for a dinghy.  At least we were able to get a great view of it and it is beautiful.

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Did Cape Horn on Insignia -- think it was 2010. Weather was so rough most of passengers and crew were sick.  Needless to say we were the only one in Toscana that night.   The sommelier was an expert as he decanted a bottle of red without spilling a drop.

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19 hours ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

You're Oceania invoice has your planned stops and their order of arrivals. Compare that to a map and you'll come close to figuring out the "route." 

Not knowing when or what ship your "adventure" in Patagonia will be, I can't help you beyond saying that you can usually expect Ushuaia, Punta Arenas and cruising the Chilean fjords (best part of the cruise).  

 

I'm sorry. I guess I was a little obtuse and didn't mention it was a Cape Horn cruise, with Cape Horn on the itinerary enroute from Lima to Buenos Aires. My question was: what were people's experiences in rounding the the tip of South America. Were the chances pretty good that we might see Cape Horn in passing? Or was the weather so stormy that the ships sailed with the Magellenic or some other route?

 

Mia

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19 hours ago, Mura said:

Way back when -- before Oceania came into existence -- we were on an NCL cruise from Buenos Aires to Santiago.  We did go to Cape Horn --- and the weather was gorgeous that day.  But no, we did NOT land on shore.

 

If I'm remembering correctly -- always questionable -- you can go on land on some of the "expedition" cruises, but I don't think any of the bigger ships permit that.  And maybe that is because THEY aren't permitted to take passengers on shore.

 

But it's a wonderful view. 

048 Cape Horn T.jpg

 

Thanks Mura, we are looking forward to this cruise. Have had to put it off several times but it looks pretty serious right now!

 

Mia 🤗🤗

Edited by marylovestotravel
typo

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4 hours ago, PaulMCO said:

Did Cape Horn on Insignia -- think it was 2010. Weather was so rough most of passengers and crew were sick.  Needless to say we were the only one in Toscana that night.   The sommelier was an expert as he decanted a bottle of red without spilling a drop.

 

What a great story!

 

Mia

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1 hour ago, marylovestotravel said:

 

I'm sorry. I guess I was a little obtuse and didn't mention it was a Cape Horn cruise, with Cape Horn on the itinerary enroute from Lima to Buenos Aires. My question was: what were people's experiences in rounding the the tip of South America. Were the chances pretty good that we might see Cape Horn in passing? Or was the weather so stormy that the ships sailed with the Magellenic or some other route?

 

Mia

While times have changed since the early 1900s, you should try to see this video (or, at least, some excerpted clips): 

https://store.mysticseaport.org/around-cape-horn-dvd-1028517.html

 

Hopefully by now, you've figured out that, while weather may permit passing the Cape Horn headland on Isla Hornos, you're not docking or tendering to that island. When you read "Cruising Cape Horn" on the itinerary, it is like "Cruising the Chilean Fjords." You're not stopping there. Rather, you're underway the entire time. And, as aforementioned, how close (if at all) you'll get to Isla Hornos depends on weather and sea conditions. 

We did the Cape earlier this year on Sirena and the weather was very agreeable though Cape Horn was a bit windy:

IMG_6188.JPG

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I wanted to go around Cape Horn and was always told to go around Cape Horn on the largest ship.  Therefore I went on Cunard Queen Mary 2.  This was about 10 years ago.  We sailed around the horn and it was rough.  Then the ship turned and we went back.  Then we continued through Magellan Strait to the west side of South America. Magellan Strait was calm and a lovely day of sailing.

 

I was disappointed that we did not actually go around the cape and continue.  However, was told that there are no cruise ships that would chance the full sailing around the cape.  It is just too rough. Those ships are worth a fortune and the passengers are priceless cargo.

 

Many are still going to say that they went right around Cape Horn. If so, which ship were you on.

 

Also there is a ship that does take people to land on Cape Horn. At least I saw it in a TV program not long ago. 

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We went around the Horn in the Zaandam in 2016....calm day....water like a farm pond.  The wind and waves picked up considerably as we sailed northbound up the west side of Chile.  When we were far enough north the ship ducked into the fjords and we were then searching for glaciers.

The Stella Australis is a small ship that sails from Ushuaia and may be one that has sailings that allow land visits to Cape Horm.

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43 minutes ago, oceansandseas said:

I wanted to go around Cape Horn and was always told to go around Cape Horn on the largest ship.  Therefore I went on Cunard Queen Mary 2.  This was about 10 years ago.  We sailed around the horn and it was rough.  Then the ship turned and we went back.  Then we continued through Magellan Strait to the west side of South America. Magellan Strait was calm and a lovely day of sailing.

 

I was disappointed that we did not actually go around the cape and continue.  However, was told that there are no cruise ships that would chance the full sailing around the cape.  It is just too rough. Those ships are worth a fortune and the passengers are priceless cargo.

 

Many are still going to say that they went right around Cape Horn. If so, which ship were you on.

 

Also there is a ship that does take people to land on Cape Horn. At least I saw it in a TV program not long ago. 

Cruised right past Isla Hornos (and the Cape headlands) on March 3, 2019 aboard Oceania Sirena. As aforementioned, calm seas though windy.

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1 hour ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

Cruised right past Isla Hornos (and the Cape headlands) on March 3, 2019 aboard Oceania Sirena. As aforementioned, calm seas though windy.

Also spent two days in the fjords.

IMG_1644.PNG

Edited by Flatbush Flyer

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6 hours ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

While times have changed since the early 1900s, you should try to see this video (or, at least, some excerpted clips): 

https://store.mysticseaport.org/around-cape-horn-dvd-1028517.html

 

Hopefully by now, you've figured out that, while weather may permit passing the Cape Horn headland on Isla Hornos, you're not docking or tendering to that island. When you read "Cruising Cape Horn" on the itinerary, it is like "Cruising the Chilean Fjords." You're not stopping there. Rather, you're underway the entire time. And, as aforementioned, how close (if at all) you'll get to Isla Hornos depends on weather and sea conditions. 

We did the Cape earlier this year on Sirena and the weather was very agreeable though Cape Horn was a bit windy:

IMG_6188.JPG

 

Thanks, with your heads-up I looked for the video and found this:

 

It was amazing to see what people would subject themselves to. The narrator's sense and pursuit of adventure!

 

Mia

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When we did Cape Horn, we had a force 10 gale.  I thought that it was great and a lot of fun.  My wife much strongly disagreed w me.  What was really fun was watching them try to board the pilot that was required for those waters.  It took them several hours and a number of tries to get him on board.  It was also fun watching the pilot boat getting bounced around.

DON

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This thread is getting me excited to see everything in the Cape area in February, 2020. I'll be on the Island Princess and have an itinerary that includes Amalia Glacier, Punta Arenas, Ushuaia, Cape Horn and Falkland Islands. 

 

Is the Amalia Glacier in the Chilean fjords?

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We did an around the horn last year on NCL.  Actually you don’t go around the horn but down to it.  Here is a thread that explains the route into or out of the Beagle channel, to or from Ushuaia. 

Budget Queen was on our cruise and has done this itinerary 13 times.  She is a wealth of knowledge of which side of the ship to be on for the different areas.  If you have any questions, you might see if you can search through things she has posted on the SA port of calls board. She even knows where you might look for penguins going into the Falklands. She definitely knows where all the glaciers are. 

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"We did an around the horn last year on NCL.  Actually you don’t go around the horn but down to it."

 

I'm sure this is true of the NCL itinerary.  The OP is considering Oceana.  Likely different.

We went around the Horn on HAL a couple of years ago.  Great trip...no turning around.

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3 hours ago, thinfool said:

I'm sure this is true of the NCL itinerary.  The OP is considering Oceana.  Likely different.

 

Yes that would be  quite different

Oceana  is  a P & O ship  which is  a bit larger  than any  Oceania  ship

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