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I would want to take my CBD cream with me on my cruise out of Sydney.

Will they allow me to fly in to sydney with it?

Does Sydney  sell this now for medicinal purposes?

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3 hours ago, Russell21 said:

What is CBD cream?

Not Central Business District 

Cheers Carole

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Medicinal marijuana products are just now becoming available in Australia and they are strictly controlled. They are only available on a doctor's prescription.

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3 hours ago, floridababa said:

Thank you  I'm hoping things get a little less controlled by March 🙂

If you have a Dr orescription or even a letter, it shouldn't be a problem.

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This link has the specific traveller exemption requirements for cannabis based medicines.

 

It must be a prescribed medicine, with the appropriate documentation.

 

Of course, you must declare it on the Customs form

 

https://www.tga.gov.au/medicinal-cannabis-importation-and-travellers-exemption

 

Certainly, not going to change by March. 
 

Edited by Docker123

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22 minutes ago, banzaii said:

If you have a Dr orescription or even a letter, it shouldn't be a problem.

Do you have a link to this advice?

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1 minute ago, By The Bay said:

Do you have a link to this advice?

Why would it be any different to any opiod?

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2 minutes ago, banzaii said:

Why would it be any different to any opiod?

When did cannabis become an opioid?

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Evidence of a doctor's prescription is required, not a doctor's letter. Here is an extract from the Government website relating to the importation of cannabis products.

Traveller's exemption

Under subregulation 5(2) of the Customs (Prohibited Import) Regulations 1956, a traveller (or traveller's carer) on board a ship or aircraft entering Australia to carry up to 3 months' supply of a therapeutic good for the medical treatment of that passenger or another passenger under his or her care, where that good was prescribed by a medical practitioner. Evidence that the amount imported does not exceed those specified in the prescription for a 3 month period may be required to be provided on entry into Australia.

This exemption does not specify the country of origin of the prescription, but does require that the importer has a prescription given by a medical practitioner and was supplied to the person in accordance with that prescription (i.e. by dispensing through a pharmacist, rather than supply through some other form of retail or other mechanism). This may be evidenced in the packaging and label on the therapeutic good.

Note that a prescription is a particular form of medical documentation which is a higher standard of documentary evidence than the 'written authority' required for the personal import of non-controlled substances. Medicinal cannabis is often provided in other countries by mechanisms other than a prescription, and such authorisations/provisions may not meet the requirements of the Customs (Prohibited Import) Regulations 1956.

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9 minutes ago, By The Bay said:

When did cannabis become an opioid?

It's not! I think you might be on it!

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Cannabis isn't an opioid, but it is regarded as a substitute for opioids and is claimed to be less addictive and less harmfull. 

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I stand corrected but am not sure why a letter is good enough for other controlled substances but not medicinal cannibas.

 

In fact, if you were to read the following advice first, you probably wouldn't delve any further:

From https://www.abf.gov.au/entering-and-leaving-australia/can-you-bring-it-in/categories/medicines-and-substances

You do not need a permit to bring in most prescription medicines even if they contain a controlled substance because such imports are generally covered by a traveller exemption scheme.

Prescription medication can be imported under a traveller exemption, provided that:

you are arriving in Australia as a passenger on board a ship or aircraftthe medicine is carried in your accompanied baggage you carry a letter or copy of your prescription (written in English) from your doctor to certify that the medicine has been prescribed to you to treat a medical condition the quantity of the medicine does not exceed three months supply.

You should leave your medicine in its original packaging and declare it to the Australian Border Force when you arrive.

Examples

Prescription medicines such as morphine, oxycodone, methadone, methylphenidate, Adderall®, and benzodiazepines are all covered
 by the traveller exemption outlined above.

Edited by banzaii

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Australian authorities have been very 'anti-marijuana' for many years. I am not advocating the use of the drug and have never used it. However, I can see a use for medicinal cannabis that has the hallucinogenic part of it removed. There have been many reports of this product being beneficial to people.

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Medical cannabis has only been approved in Australia for use in a limited number of applications, some with age restrictions. It is not a simple Dr prescribes and you get it. Approval has to be applied for, with justification.  Access can be denied if a sufficient case is not made. Of course, it is still illegal in Australia. Hi 

 

There is research evidence that some of the claims do not stand up in clinical trials. But it does have important uses.

 

Opioids have a much longer history of use, and controlled supply. However, we have seen the growing clamp down on access. No longer available in over the counter preparations, only one prescription at a time, etc.

 

A lot of the efficacy of opioids is also debated as a go to pain med for longer term use. It has a paradoxical effect of eventually increasing the pain.

 

 

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9 hours ago, MicCanberra said:

That CBD cream would be very hard to roll and even harder to light.


It could be good to put in the brownies.  Or so I have heard.

 

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39 minutes ago, IWantToLiveOverTheSea said:

A lot of those products, from what I've seen, are made from hemp oil.  Is hemp oil really illegal in Australia?  

Yes. It is illegal. Medicinal cannabis oil has become available under very strict controls with a prescription from a doctor. 

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