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Formula280SS

NOROVIRUS ON CRUISES – CAN WE JUST DISCUSS

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Just some of our thoughts (and after discussions with many other passengers over the years, including during a significant Norovirus outbreak on a 12N So. Caribbean cruise) after our ‘almost Norovirus on NCL Bliss and reading about Norovirus on NCL Joy (recent cruises 21D LA-NY Bliss and MIA-LA Joy).

 

Comments, thoughts and other recommendations and cautions VERY WELCOMED.

 

Also welcomed, CHIDING for "eliminating all the cruising experiences."  🙄

 

PRIOR CRUISE:

 

If there has been an actual (or even a remote chance based upon input on message boards such as CruiseCritic) of norovirus on the prior cruise:

 

Ask your room steward if your stateroom, or adjoining stateroom serviced by the same steward was affected.

 

If the answer was “yes,” make sure the room was treated and determined to be safe and that all of the bedding has been replaced and all of the walls, surfaces and fabrics and carpeting has been treating and, after inspection, determined safe.  If any concerns still exist, ask for (demand) a new stateroom without such preconditions.

 

If the answer was “no,” use your judgment and consider using the bathroom sink filled with hot water and bar of soap and wash every inch of the bathroom, your contact surfaces, “including the TV remote control” and light switches.  For fabrics and carpets, spray Lysol or a soap and water based product generously.  Remind the room steward to “not vacuum” for a day until the carpet is completely dried so as to not “vaporize” the chemicals from the heat and exhaust of the vacuum.

 

Finally, if you’re still concerned (it is 100% up to you), as for a 3-day supply of towels and decline any steward daily room service or delivery of fruits and snacks.

 

GENERAL VIRUS SOURCE – FECAL MATTER:

 

Not a popular subject, but it needs to be addressed.

 

Bathroom Hygiene - Passengers and crew cannot be relied upon to perform the proper hygiene regimen; sorry “it is what it is” and the number of reports of both populations coming out of stall in all restrooms is real.

 

Personal Hygiene* – Shower with soap and water; tough one here (no shaming).  The size of the showers in the staterooms vary; generally they are very, very small “for the average person.”  For those “well above average” it could be almost impossible to properly shower in one of those tiny, half round glass showers.  So, what are the alternatives?  The hot tubs and pools have showers at the entrance: (1) if they do not have soap, less effective and (2) even if they do “how many passengers actually wash with soap and water prior to entering a hot tub or a pool?

 

*Best precaution – YOU can’t manage or require the hygiene of anyone but yourself.  As a result, avoid the hot tubs and pools under conditions in which an infection on the ship are cautionary and you’ve noted increased sanitization procedures and/or been informed by the Captain (usually well after you’ve noted the increased sanitization procedures).

 

Ports of Call – The same core issues above are elevated when making ports of call to lesser hygiene capable ports; i.e., handshakes, drinking the water, drinks with ice from local water, and the food (especially preparation), as well as taxis, excursions and public transportation.  THINK of who is preparing what in addition to WHAT you are putting directly into your ‘system.

 

Return to Ship from Ports of Call – A little discussed source of potential infection is ‘not the “washy-washy” spray on the way back on the ship; IT IS THE BOTTOM OF THE SHOES (and potentially the parts of your CLOTHING where you made contact).

 

*Best precaution – YOU can’t manage or require these concerns of anyone but yourself.  As a result, avoid the areas where returning passengers SHOES make contact (especially expect that shoes are placed directly on fabric chairs by many, or when one removes their SHOES or SANDALS to sit by the pool).  Also, as many returnee’s go right to the bars, be cautious of the bartender hands on your drinks from cross-contamination (especially if you’ve noticed returnee’s shaking bartenders hand or tipping).

 

FOOD AREAS:

 

Avoid the Menus – OK, how do you avoid the menus?  Well, there are a couple options and alternatives.  At the entrance to the dining venue, using you smart phone, TAKE A PICTURE OF THE MENUS.  The can be available on your stateroom TV, hallway display screens, at the restaurant reservation desk or at the entrance to the dining venue.  For the specialty restaurants, the first day on the ship at the restaurant reservation desk, have the reservation staff hold up each menu and take a picture of each page.  Done for the cruise for those venues.

 

Most new cruise ships have multiple soap and water wash stations on both sides of the entrances to buffets; some even in general dining.  Some also have single stations at entrance to specialty dining venues. If use of these is noticeably enforced, you’re on a ship that could have a reduced risk in these areas.  If not enforced, for example you notice people ‘walking right around or even through without washing, or even just ‘faking washing, that risk is no longer reduced.

 

Wash your hands with soap and water religiously and excessively, before and after every contact with potentially infected surfaces, serving tongs* etc.  Washing before serving yourself in areas such as a buffet, you must wash again after using the tongs*.  Be sure to bring an adequate supply of sanitizing napkins (both soap and water or the alcohol based).

 

*Best precaution - bring a box of 50-100 restaurant quality latex glove(s) and, after done, roll off your hand (from thumb inside wrist, pull inside out) and dispose of immediately; i.e., do not then use the gloved hand on your dinnerware, table, napkin or any other surfaces.  Or, if you have brought sanitizer napkins, use such.  If you have forgot such, use an extra paper or cloth unused napkin wrapped on one hand.

 

Avoid using all “salt and pepper shakers* and bottles sauces*.”

 

*Best precaution – bring your own packaged salt and pepper packets, favorite sauces (Tabasco, A1) and dressings.  If you have forgot such, use an extra paper or cloth unused napkin wrapped on one hand.

 

Avoid “raw foods” including fish and meats (under cooked also) and fresh salads and vegetables (opting for cooked vegetables).

 

OTHER:

 

Avoid “shaking hands” with other passengers, crew and even officers and restaurant managers and bartenders; politely explaining your concerns.

 

Avoid sitting on and touching fabric chairs and couches.”

 

Beforesitting on leather chairs and couches” wipe with your sanitized wipes.  If you have not brought such on board, use a fresh napkin, take it to the “washy-washy” area and soak half of it for washing the seating and the back side for drying.  Keep your hands free from contact with the soiled area; if not, repeat “washy-washy” soap and water.

 

Avoid elevators” even if empty.  If, for safety you must, use a napkin or sanitized wipe on the elevator buttons.  If others later board the elevator, there is nothing wrong with ‘stepping out if you feel there are concerns with one or more other elevator passengers.

 

Avoid “stairway railings hand contact.  If, for safety you must, use a restaurant quality latex glove on one hand and, after done, roll off your hand (from thumb inside wrist, pull inside out) and dispose of immediately; i.e., do not then use the gloved hand on your stateroom or other contact surfaces.

 

Avoiddoor handle hand contact.”  Keep a small package of Kleenex tissue to use to open such doors, including your stateroom door.

 

Avoid, after observation of servers, drinking from glasses and cups that have been held inappropriately by the server; i.e., having the hands/fingers on the top half of the glass or cup (especially the rim).  Simply ask for another serving and explain the preventative measure to them.

 

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I find most of that to be overkill.  In all my cruises I've never done anything more than perhaps wash my hands more than I normally do on land.  If I were to be that paranoid and did all of the things suggested I wouldn't even consider stepping on to a cruise ship.

 

I appreciate your thoughts though.

 

 

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@Formula280SS I appreciate the time it took to create your list/post. However, like @ColeThornton I'm not going to do 90% of those. I shower (with soap), I wash my hands, I get a flu shot, I take 2g of Vitamin C twice a day. I do all of these regardless of where I am. The end. 

Edited by JennyB1977

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Don’t touch anything.  Got it.

 

How can you also assume that staff handling your food are also following these same tips?  I would go a step further and don’t eat anything either.

 

Have a fun cruise.

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11 minutes ago, Liljo22 said:

Don’t touch anything.  Got it.

 

How can you also assume that staff handling your food are also following these same tips?  I would go a step further and don’t eat anything either.

 

Have a fun cruise.

LOL

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Come on now.  I can understand some caution, but this seems excessive.  

 

I'm trying to envision myself having the staff hold up menus for me so I don't have to touch them myself, but I just can't do it.  

 

 

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3 hours ago, ColeThornton said:

I find most of that to be overkill.  In all my cruises I've never done anything more than perhaps wash my hands more than I normally do on land.  If I were to be that paranoid and did all of the things suggested I wouldn't even consider stepping on to a cruise ship.

 

I appreciate your thoughts though.

 

 

 

NP. 

 

IMO, not overkill if you're on a ship with potential or actual Norovirus outbreak, it's your choice.  On almost all other cruises, with no signs of potential or actual Norovirus, we don't need to employ the above precautions.

 

2 hours ago, JennyB1977 said:

@Formula280SS I appreciate the time it took to create your list/post. However, like @ColeThornton I'm not going to do 90% of those. I shower (with soap), I wash my hands, I get a flu shot, I take 2g of Vitamin C twice a day. I do all of these regardless of where I am. The end. 

 

NP.

 

IMO, your personal hygiene is not the issue when a Norovirus breaks out, it's your choice if you are on one such such with such an outbreak.

 

2 hours ago, Liljo22 said:

Don’t touch anything.  Got it.

 

How can you also assume that staff handling your food are also following these same tips?  I would go a step further and don’t eat anything either.

 

Have a fun cruise.

 

NP.

 

Good point re: staff handling the food; really nothing you can do.  Again, good point.  

 

Re: "don't eat anything either" that is exactly what we did for three days on a 12N So. Caribbean cruise with a massive Norovirus outbreak.  Our ship wasn't allowed at ports, we were down to sheets in our stateroom; no curtains, furnishing pillows, walls and rugs sprayed by 'masked staff, hallways full of 'special response teams, elevators closed; a real blast.

 

Again, not advice for a normal cruise, just one with potential or actual Norovirus infection.

 

Obviously, not a standard cruise checklist; just preparedness.

 

2 hours ago, PTC DAWG said:

WOW...staying home in a bubble sounds like more fun.  

 

Staying at home is not a choice once on a Norovirus infected ship.  Staying in a bubble on the ship is the only alternative.

 

Again, this is not an every cruise commentary, it's about cruises with potential or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

42 minutes ago, Phaedrus78 said:

Come on now.  I can understand some caution, but this seems excessive.  

 

I'm trying to envision myself having the staff hold up menus for me so I don't have to touch them myself, but I just can't do it.  

 

 

 

NP.

 

It's only excessive if there is a potential or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

On the Bliss 21D LA-NY, the hostess removed the paper menu, sprayed the leather holder EACH TIME USED and replace the paper menu.  Recommended taking picture of menu to other passengers.

 

So, it's a choice on such potential or actual Norovirus outbreak.

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8 minutes ago, Deeliteful said:

Paranoia in the extreme! 
 

 

Again, if on a ship with a potential or actual Norovirus outbreak, it is not only not paranoia or in the extreme.

 

Wait until you're on one and you see what the ships' Captain requires.

 

If you don't comply, you, your stateroom guests get a free "off load" at the next port.  We've seen it.

 

Also again, not for a normal cruise, for a cruise with a potential or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

Appears to be a lack of understanding, comprehension and situational circumstances as elaborated in the OP.

 

Thanks.

 

7 minutes ago, JustAPilot said:

Just charter your own private yacht, problem solved. 

 

 

Also again, not for a normal cruise, for a cruise with a potential or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

Appears to be a lack of understanding, comprehension and situational circumstances as elaborated in the OP.

 

Thanks.

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2 hours ago, JennyB1977 said:

@Formula280SS I appreciate the time it took to create your list/post. However, like @ColeThornton I'm not going to do 90% of those. I shower (with soap), I wash my hands, I get a flu shot, I take 2g of Vitamin C twice a day. I do all of these regardless of where I am. The end. 

 

I'm glad you get a flu shot, but it won't help you avoid Norovirus. They're different viruses...

vitamin C won't help either, Noro is one of the most infectious viruses out there and spreads rapidly. 

Constantly washing your hands though, that'll help. And surfaces. Wiping surfaces is as important.

 

Most cruise ships get noro by way of airports and airplanes... More passengers per time period so it's easier to spread. It only takes one person to contract it on the plane and then start symptoms on the ship...

 

 

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@Alegeeter I am aware those two will not specifically shield me from Noro. They help my immune system in general. Other than recommended vaccinations, that is all I'm willing to do at this point in my life.

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5 hours ago, Formula280SS said:

If there has been an actual (or even a remote chance based upon input on message boards such as CruiseCritic) of norovirus on the prior cruise:

OP, you predicate your precautions on this basis, yet do you realize that nothing is made public unless the reportable cases reaches 3% of passengers and crew?  Yet, the ship has to make a report to the CDC every time it enters the US from foreign with the number of GI cases, even if the number is zero.  It also has to make a special report at 2% of passengers and crew, but this is not posted on the CDC website.  So, your social media may not report anything, since no one noticed anything, but perhaps 1% of passengers were ill with noro, maybe in your cabin.  How do you determine this threshold for your precautions.

 

5 hours ago, Formula280SS said:

make sure the room was treated and determined to be safe and that all of the bedding has been replaced and all of the walls, surfaces and fabrics and carpeting has been treating and, after inspection, determined safe. 

What is the stateroom "treatment" (I know, but I wonder if you do), and what is the level and methodology of "inspection" and how is it determined "safe"?  Inquiring minds, including the CDC would like to know.

 

5 hours ago, Formula280SS said:

delivery of fruits and snacks.

Per the USPH VSP, all "ready to eat foods" like fruits must be sanitized in a chlorine solution prior to being placed out for service.

 

The chlorine levels required to be maintained in the pools and hot tubs onboard are well within the levels to kill noro, as the USPH requires.

 

Restricting use of stairwell handrails to "only when absolutely necessary" is a recipe for injury on a ship.  This is poor advice.

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For me I really only have two hard rules when traveling. 

 

 

1) assume the remote control is the dirtiest thing you'll come in contact with and wipe it down before using. 

 

2) throw any all all bedcovers/comforters in an area of the room I wont come in contact. 

 

 

Other than that I'm ok rolling the dice.  of course, I wash hands several times a day.  but I will use handrails on stairwells.  i'll push the floor buttons in elevators.  i'll shake hands (although my PCP has begun fist bumping me after two decades of visits. hmmmm).  

 

then again, at the right moment and time i'll drink right out of the bottle after bonding with strangers I just met.  CHEERS!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, chengkp75 said:

OP, you predicate your precautions on this basis, yet do you realize that nothing is made public unless the reportable cases reaches 3% of passengers and crew?  Yet, the ship has to make a report to the CDC every time it enters the US from foreign with the number of GI cases, even if the number is zero.  It also has to make a special report at 2% of passengers and crew, but this is not posted on the CDC website.  So, your social media may not report anything, since no one noticed anything, but perhaps 1% of passengers were ill with noro, maybe in your cabin.  How do you determine this threshold for your precautions.

 

What is the stateroom "treatment" (I know, but I wonder if you do), and what is the level and methodology of "inspection" and how is it determined "safe"?  Inquiring minds, including the CDC would like to know.

 

Per the USPH VSP, all "ready to eat foods" like fruits must be sanitized in a chlorine solution prior to being placed out for service.

 

The chlorine levels required to be maintained in the pools and hot tubs onboard are well within the levels to kill noro, as the USPH requires.

 

Restricting use of stairwell handrails to "only when absolutely necessary" is a recipe for injury on a ship.  This is poor advice.

 

chengkp75

 

Very familiar with you educational posts and always appreciated.

 

However, instead of explaining the issues raised it appears you are 'rousing.  I am not an expert, nor represented such.

 

"OP, you predicate your precautions on this basis, yet do you realize that nothing is made public unless the reportable cases reaches 3% of passengers and crew?  Yet, the ship has to make a report to the CDC every time it enters the US from foreign with the number of GI cases, even if the number is zero.  It also has to make a special report at 2% of passengers and crew, but this is not posted on the CDC website.  So, your social media may not report anything, since no one noticed anything, but perhaps 1% of passengers were ill with noro, maybe in your cabin.  How do you determine this threshold for your precautions."

 

Well, social media, FaceBook and CruiseCritic pointed out the conditions on the NCL Bliss; which basically consisted of procedures by the crew in food venues, stairways, hallways and staterooms "prior to any announcement form the Captain" and at no point did he indicated what % of passengers or crew had been affected.  He did, however, explain what the procedures were for and that such GI issues related procedures were to contain the spread of cases.

 

So, I'd place that in the first classification in the OP of "potential" or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

I don't have anything else to offer.

 

To a "reasonably prudent person," based on what was experienced on the cruise, there was definitely the "potential" for a Norovirus condition on the ship and that would be OUR THRESHOLD.

 

It is not a requirement for others; everyone can do what they deem appropriate for themselves.

 

"What is the stateroom "treatment" (I know, but I wonder if you do), and what is the level and methodology of "inspection" and how is it determined "safe"?  Inquiring minds, including the CDC would like to know."

 

Again, I've always respected you informational and experienced based posts; by why the challenge for me ("I know, but I wonder if you do")?

 

I do not know what the 'treatment is or the 'inspection standards are; however, I'm sure the Captain and the CDC ("inquiring minds") do. 

 

I find it satisfactory to simply "ask" to confirm such.  I'm not there to perform such required procedures.

 

"Per the USPH VSP, all "ready to eat foods" like fruits must be sanitized in a chlorine solution prior to being placed out for service.

 

Again, just repeating what was recommended, especially with regard to RAW FISH AND MEAT and RAW vegetables.  I don't think I mentioned fruit; but it's nice to know what they put on it.

 

The chlorine levels required to be maintained in the pools and hot tubs onboard are well within the levels to kill noro, as the USPH requires."

 

Again, I believe you are well versed in such requirements.  Our experience with over-chlorinated pools 'prior to a Norovirus announcement found us with the Medics for entering into a hot tub for 45 seconds.  

 

I did not know that all pools and hot tubs were chlorinated to the level  to kill all Norovirus.  That's good to know.

 

"Restricting use of stairwell handrails to "only when absolutely necessary" is a recipe for injury on a ship.  This is poor advice."

 

Again, the OP stated, for SAFETY REASONS, to alternately use railings with protective wipes or take the elevators.

 

There are many on the ship that can use the stairways easily, at sea or at ports.  Others cannot; and such was addressed.

 

So, it was not a required recommendation to not use the rails, just what adjustments to make when doing such, so such would not make it poor advice.

 

 

 

Edited by Formula280SS

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13 minutes ago, havanadaydreaming said:

For me I really only have two hard rules when traveling. 

 

1) assume the remote control is the dirtiest thing you'll come in contact with and wipe it down before using.   Agreed.

 

2) throw any all all bedcovers/comforters in an area of the room I wont come in contact. Agreed.

 

Other than that I'm ok rolling the dice.  of course, I wash hands several times a day.  but I will use handrails on stairwells.  i'll push the floor buttons in elevators.  i'll shake hands (although my PCP has begun fist bumping me after two decades of visits. hmmmm).  On a normal cruise, agreed.  On a cruise as described in the OP, with "potential" or actual Norovirus outbreak; we start implementing the safeguards.

 

then again, at the right moment and time i'll drink right out of the bottle after bonding with strangers I just met.  CHEERS!!!  OK, you lose me here.  😲

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for reply.  Comments in RED.

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1 hour ago, Formula280SS said:

 

chengkp75

 

Very familiar with you educational posts and always appreciated.

 

However, instead of explaining the issues raised it appears you are 'rousing.  I am not an expert, nor represented such.

Yeah, the chief has a long history of debunking factually incorrect posts from people who like to post as if they have expertise in areas that they are actually know little or nothing about. It's great for Cruise Critic that he does. He's one of the greatest assets this community has.

 

If you think for one second your original post isn't written in a way to suggest that you are an expert I'd just simply suggest you think again.  He has every right to be " 'rousing'' in response to your post. 

Edited by njhorseman

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We've only been on one cruise that had a documented Noro outbreak, a TA last spring.  So far, in 40 or so cruises we've managed to stay healthy without all the extreme measures in the first post; I will say that my husband often comes down with an upper respiratory illness, probably contracted on the airplane.

 

The cruise we were on this spring did put in place some stringent measures to slow the outbreak; disposable printed menus, tables cleared of salt shakers, etc., no self serving in the buffet and things like desserts weren't even in the show cases plus lots and lots of cleaning and confining people to their rooms.

 

For ourselves, we do mainly the same things we always do, at home or on a cruise, possibly amped up a bit if our cruise has an outbreak of Noro.  Wash our hands well and often, mainly.  I do use stair rails, elevator buttons, etc. and don't worry too much about buffets, etc.  So far so good. 

 

While Noro is miserable, especially on a vacation, we have probably all had it at one time or another.  I am not going to live my life in extreme fear of germs in general.

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2 hours ago, Formula280SS said:

 

chengkp75

 

Very familiar with you educational posts and always appreciated.

 

However, instead of explaining the issues raised it appears you are 'rousing.  I am not an expert, nor represented such.

 

"OP, you predicate your precautions on this basis, yet do you realize that nothing is made public unless the reportable cases reaches 3% of passengers and crew?  Yet, the ship has to make a report to the CDC every time it enters the US from foreign with the number of GI cases, even if the number is zero.  It also has to make a special report at 2% of passengers and crew, but this is not posted on the CDC website.  So, your social media may not report anything, since no one noticed anything, but perhaps 1% of passengers were ill with noro, maybe in your cabin.  How do you determine this threshold for your precautions."

 

Well, social media, FaceBook and CruiseCritic pointed out the conditions on the NCL Bliss; which basically consisted of procedures by the crew in food venues, stairways, hallways and staterooms "prior to any announcement form the Captain" and at no point did he indicated what % of passengers or crew had been affected.  He did, however, explain what the procedures were for and that such GI issues related procedures were to contain the spread of cases.

 

So, I'd place that in the first classification in the OP of "potential" or actual Norovirus outbreak.

 

I don't have anything else to offer.

 

To a "reasonably prudent person," based on what was experienced on the cruise, there was definitely the "potential" for a Norovirus condition on the ship and that would be OUR THRESHOLD.

 

It is not a requirement for others; everyone can do what they deem appropriate for themselves.

 

"What is the stateroom "treatment" (I know, but I wonder if you do), and what is the level and methodology of "inspection" and how is it determined "safe"?  Inquiring minds, including the CDC would like to know."

 

Again, I've always respected you informational and experienced based posts; by why the challenge for me ("I know, but I wonder if you do")?

 

I do not know what the 'treatment is or the 'inspection standards are; however, I'm sure the Captain and the CDC ("inquiring minds") do. 

 

I find it satisfactory to simply "ask" to confirm such.  I'm not there to perform such required procedures.

 

"Per the USPH VSP, all "ready to eat foods" like fruits must be sanitized in a chlorine solution prior to being placed out for service.

 

Again, just repeating what was recommended, especially with regard to RAW FISH AND MEAT and RAW vegetables.  I don't think I mentioned fruit; but it's nice to know what they put on it.

 

The chlorine levels required to be maintained in the pools and hot tubs onboard are well within the levels to kill noro, as the USPH requires."

 

Again, I believe you are well versed in such requirements.  Our experience with over-chlorinated pools 'prior to a Norovirus announcement found us with the Medics for entering into a hot tub for 45 seconds.  

 

I did not know that all pools and hot tubs were chlorinated to the level  to kill all Norovirus.  That's good to know.

 

"Restricting use of stairwell handrails to "only when absolutely necessary" is a recipe for injury on a ship.  This is poor advice."

 

Again, the OP stated, for SAFETY REASONS, to alternately use railings with protective wipes or take the elevators.

 

There are many on the ship that can use the stairways easily, at sea or at ports.  Others cannot; and such was addressed.

 

So, it was not a required recommendation to not use the rails, just what adjustments to make when doing such, so such would not make it poor advice.

 

 

 

And I say, okay, there is no social media coverage about noro on a particular ship/cruise, and there is no noticeable change in procedures onboard, yet nearly 2% of passengers could be ill with noro, and your "precautions" would be meaningless since there was no "notification" about any illness, and you could be just as likely to catch it on that cruise, where there was no notification as one where everyone posted about it.  Also, the most important data point is not the raw number of reported cases, but the trend of those cases, and a report of an outbreak on one cruise does not necessarily translate to another cruise, especially if they have done a deep clean.  Even after the most extensive deep clean, one new embarking passenger with poor personal hygiene can "re-infect" the ship.  In 95% of the cases, the trend of reported cases rises during the cruise, and then starts to fall off towards the end, as remediation measures take effect.  Now, if the level of cases remains constant across the end of one cruise and the beginning of the next, then it is likely a crew member spreading it.  If, however, the number of cases drops towards the end of the cruise, but then starts to rise again on the next,  it is most commonly a new passenger who has brought it back onboard. 

 

Well, you stated that you would demand to know if the cabin had been treated, and whether after treatment and inspection it was safe.  If you don't know what those methods are, then anything they say in response to your demand could be just gobbledygook, and you would have no idea of whether you are "protected" or whether your demand for a new cabin (and whether that cabin is "safe"), so this is a meaningless "precaution".

 

Hot tubs are not "over-chlorinated", the CDC does not find that the levels mandated pose any significant health risks, but some folks have more sensitive skin.

 

I'm not talking about people with disabilities using the handrails.  I'm talking about everyone.  An old, old, sea adage is "one hand for you (your safety), and one hand for the ship (your drink in this case).  On a moving vessel, it is always prudent to either use a handrail on a stairwell, or be prepared to do so in an instant, should the ship suddenly shudder or roll.

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You don’t mention the casino! Probably one of the most obvious places for germs of any sort to be.

Chips, cards, slot machines, 🤮

Edited by Deeliteful

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More overkill than I do, but you do raise a lot of points to consider. I try to only use my own toilet, but sometimes cabin placement makes that more of a challenge. I carry hand sanitizer to use for the hand contamination that occurs between the buffet entrance and sitting down to eat. I turn away from coughers and leave the area when possible. I also almost never take the elevator, both to get exercise and to avoid crowded spaces.

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I feel like a lot of this is overkill , and I am super careful. My biggest preventive measure is to bring my own sanitizer. After reading a menu or using the salt/pepper shakers/condiments, I ahead and sanitize again before eating. Simple and works every time.

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Hi

 

I agree with the OP on "one" point. It is your choice as to how to deal with this. 

 

Honestly, if I felt as concerned as the OP, I wouldn't even bother travelling. In fact it would be really hard to feel safe stepping out of one's own home, considering this virus is everywhere and the same people that cruise are your neighbors and co-workers. Taking public transport would seem out of the question. Handling money would be really scary. 

 

I am sure if you really looked into the statistics there would be many more reasonable things to be concerned about. 

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