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Physical Therapist onboard?


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My PT said that it is possible to have therapy on board a cruise ship.  Has anyone ever received physical therapy while on a cruise?  If so, which cruise line?  I've tried googling to learn what cruise lines might offer this service but with no luck. I'm looking at rotator cuff surgery AGAIN and it might make it a little better to spend the recuperation on a cruise.

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This is only my opinion but, considering that the average PT in the US makes around $85k/yr, I can't imagine a cruise line keeping one on the payroll for the few or no people who would need it. I don't know that I would trust anyone in the spas.

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LOL!  I am on a cruise right now, and my PT offered to come along to be my private therapist.  Imagine that is going to be the only way to get PT on a cruise.  I am not sure I would allow a personal trainer rehab me following surgery, and that’s probably the best you’ll get.

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I've never seen or heard of one on any cruise we've been on - but they do often have acupuncture onboard.    The problem with that is, as mentioned above, what standards and training they have.    We've sat nearby in lounges when one or two of them were giving their sales pitches and the completely overblown claims they were making for their services was appalling.  

 

Your physical therapist at home can give you exercises to do on your own that will get you through until you get home.  It's easy to take along exercise bands, a simple pulley system that hooks over a door, etc. - there is much you can do to at least avoid losing any ground you've already gained.              

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Hapag-Lloyd ships have a physical therapist on board. Their 'Europa 2' ship is international. According to a patient I spoke to, the physical therapist on board is much better than the one he had at home. It's a professional physical therapist not someone with some sort of massage training. No sales pitch.  

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5 hours ago, Kartgv said:

I've never seen or heard of one on any cruise we've been on - but they do often have acupuncture onboard.    The problem with that is, as mentioned above, what standards and training they have.    We've sat nearby in lounges when one or two of them were giving their sales pitches and the completely overblown claims they were making for their services was appalling.  

 

Your physical therapist at home can give you exercises to do on your own that will get you through until you get home.  It's easy to take along exercise bands, a simple pulley system that hooks over a door, etc. - there is much you can do to at least avoid losing any ground you've already gained.              

I do swallow therapy. My Therapist gave me exercises to do on my recent cruise.

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2 hours ago, lenquixote66 said:

I do swallow therapy. My Therapist gave me exercises to do on my recent cruise.

Interesting. Where I live, Physiotherapists don't do that kind of treatment. That's the area covered by Occupational therapy or Speech therapy.

Edited by mom says
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14 hours ago, seadayfan said:

My PT said that it is possible to have therapy on board a cruise ship.  Has anyone ever received physical therapy while on a cruise?  If so, which cruise line?  I've tried googling to learn what cruise lines might offer this service but with no luck. I'm looking at rotator cuff surgery AGAIN and it might make it a little better to spend the recuperation on a cruise.

the only PTs onboard are fellow vacationers.   there is zero way I would consider the  massage staff at the spa to be qualified to conduct actual physical therapy, especially  to someone they have zero  history with.  

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13 hours ago, Kartgv said:

Your physical therapist at home can give you exercises to do on your own that will get you through until you get home.  It's easy to take along exercise bands, a simple pulley system that hooks over a door, etc. - there is much you can do to at least avoid losing any ground you've already gained.              

 

This. When I had my rotator surgery I did at least half of the PT at home on my own, following the therapist's directions of course. She supplied most of the equipment I needed.

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9 minutes ago, Pyrate13 said:

 

This. When I had my rotator surgery I did at least half of the PT at home on my own, following the therapist's directions of course. She supplied most of the equipment I needed.

The real issue of course is compliance. A lot of us suck at it.

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I think some here may be unclear about the educational requirements for a PT in the US.

 

What education do I need to become a physical therapist?
All programs offer a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. DPT programs typically last 3 years. Many programs require a bachelor's degree for admission as well as specific educational prerequisites, such as classes in anatomy, physiology, biology, chemistry, and physics.
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You will not likely find any PT for passengers on board by way of a ship staff member.  And if you did, the cost would be high and paid directly on board by you as it would likely be considered a medical treatment.  The closest you would come would be the Spa's masseuse as suggested by cruznjan - also for a rather hefty fee.

Edited by leaveitallbehind
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20 hours ago, seadayfan said:

My PT said that it is possible to have therapy on board a cruise ship.  Has anyone ever received physical therapy while on a cruise?  If so, which cruise line?  I've tried googling to learn what cruise lines might offer this service but with no luck. I'm looking at rotator cuff surgery AGAIN and it might make it a little better to spend the recuperation on a cruise.

Based on my limited amount of cruising (8 cruises) and limited PT experience, I'm reading that it's possible to continue therapy exercises on board but you wouldn't have access to a therapist.

 

Some ships have Thelasso (spelling?) pools and most have hot tubs and saunas.  The fitness centers also have various machines, and if you are using bands they pack light to travel.

 

I would double check what your therapist meant by on-board therapy and make sure you have what you need.  Prayers for a successful (and final) surgery with quick and complete healing 🙂 

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I'm surprised that anyone would want to receive or would recommend physio on board a ship where the therapist is not familiar with the patient. I mean, most if not all massage therapists/masseurs/masseuses ask for a medical history and are cautious about proceeding if there is a medical issue present such as injury, high blood pressure, chronic illness, etc.  Even if there was such a thing, I would not have therapy on board and would strongly advise OP to discuss this with his/her own medical team.

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1 hour ago, Langley Cruisers said:

I'm surprised that anyone would want to receive or would recommend physio on board a ship where the therapist is not familiar with the patient. I mean, most if not all massage therapists/masseurs/masseuses ask for a medical history and are cautious about proceeding if there is a medical issue present such as injury, high blood pressure, chronic illness, etc.  Even if there was such a thing, I would not have therapy on board and would strongly advise OP to discuss this with his/her own medical team.

 

Just want to wish you a happy Holidays....

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A trained and certified physical trainer can handle a lot of what a physical therapist does, if the PT gives some written guidelines.

 

The PT I use is actually located in my gym (separate companies), and when I had a trainer and did PT, many times, if the trainer was not busy, they would come over and join in.   

 

Most cruise ships have fitness centers/gyms, so your PT could develop at least a maintenance routine to do while you cruise.

 

Although, I have been through PT several times over the years, and find the modern "friendly" PT to be minimally effective.  Last time, they kicked me out, as I was pushing harder than they were.  There were in the mode of you did this last time, so do it again.  Where I am in, I will do more this time than last time.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/22/2019 at 4:46 PM, clo said:

This is only my opinion but, considering that the average PT in the US makes around $85k/yr, I can't imagine a cruise line keeping one on the payroll for the few or no people who would need it. I don't know that I would trust anyone in the spas.

Good point! Thanks!

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On 12/22/2019 at 4:47 PM, Mich3554 said:

LOL!  I am on a cruise right now, and my PT offered to come along to be my private therapist.  Imagine that is going to be the only way to get PT on a cruise.  I am not sure I would allow a personal trainer rehab me following surgery, and that’s probably the best you’ll get.

True!  Thanks!

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