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New Cocktails to Debut on Seven Seas Splendor


JMARINER
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My T/A sent me this. I don't think this has been posted already;

 

Regent Seven Seas Cruises has announced a collection of 19 new signature cocktails and eight new gins that will be offered exclusively on its newest cruise ship, the Seven Seas Splendor, when the ship debuts in February 2020. 

 

The new drinks are prepared with Fever-Tree premium tonic drink mixers and are Gin-, Vodka-, Whisky-, Rum-, Cognac-, Tequila- and Mezcal-based. Examples include:

VIRGO. Monkey Shoulder, Chili and Pineapple Reduction, Cinnamon Bitters, served in a Fizz Rock Glass. Virgo delivers just the right balance of sweet and spicy with a chili and pineapple reduction mixed with cinnamon bitters, orange zest, vanilla, spice and the floral notes of the smooth Monkey Shoulder Blended Scotch Whiskey.

 

BON SOIREE. Woodford Reserve, Chambord, Citrus Bitters, served in a Coupe Glass. Bon Soiree delivers a citric note with an intense touch of a raspberry liqueur and all the smoothness and warmth expected from a small-batch Kentucky straight bourbon.

 

SOMETHING BORROWED. Maker’s Mark, Amaretto, Fresh Lemon Juice, Fig Jam, served in a Fire Rock Glass. Something Borrowed is a refreshing bourbon cocktail with the nutty taste of Amaretto perfectly balanced with the flavors of lemon and fig.

The eight gin tonics also aim for modern, refreshing presentations. Guests may select their favorite – dry or sweet – with avocado or berries, as well as matching spices, herbs and other fruits. New gins include:

 

  • UNLUCKY IRISH. Irish Gunpowder, Fresh Lemon Juice, Basil, Black Peppercorns, Indian Tonic.
  • ROSE MARRIED. Beefeater, Avocado, Basil, Mint, Rosemary, Indian Tonic.
  • QUINTESENTIALLY BRITISH. Hendrick’s, Fresh Lemon Juice, Pomegranate Seeds, Cucumber, Mediterranean Tonic.
  • SUMMER SOLSTICE. Hendrick’s Midsummer Solstice, Peach Schnapps, Grapefruit, Mediterranean Tonic.

 

Nearly all signature cocktails and gins are included in the voyage price and will also be offered aboard Seven Seas Explorer in mid-year 2020.

 

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I don't know why anyone would want to drink

avocado flavored anything. 😞

 

J

Edited by JMARINER
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Thanks for information ---

  • ROSE MARRIED. Beefeater, Avocado, Basil, Mint, Rosemary, Indian Tonic.    
  • This one "NO"😂
  • QUINTESENTIALLY BRITISH. Hendrick’s, Fresh Lemon Juice, Pomegranate Seeds, Cucumber, Mediterranean Tonic.
  • This one looks good, so a "YES"😎
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2 hours ago, Hambagahle said:

Would be nice if they had written "Bonne Soirée" correctly!!

Not really difficult to get the correct spelling and agreement in any language.  My French husband always just shakes his head when looking at menus.  

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52 minutes ago, forgap said:

Not really difficult to get the correct spelling and agreement in any language.  My French husband always just shakes his head when looking at menus.  

Does he also shake his head when a waiter in the US asks him what he wants for an entrée and then discusses the main courses ??   That always gets us!!

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3 hours ago, wripro said:

Why are these cocktails reserved only for the Splendor? Are those who sail the other ship now considered second class?

 

I think it's just something to give the newest ship a little something special to start the first voyages.  More than likely these cocktaa\ils will also be available on all Regent ships shortly.

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20 hours ago, forgap said:

He is used to that....he hates “Hi, my name is Lance, ans I’ll be your server today....” or, while intruding on a conversation in progress “ How is everything here?”. 

I hate that too.   I do not need to know what the waiter's name is nor do I want to be friends with him/her as a rule!!    Unfortunately "tous ce passent bien" is taking over here in Switzerland.  Right in the middle of a conversation you to have tell the waiter everything is OK.  They should have more tact!

 

Calling a main course an entrée gets us for the first several meals when we go to the US.  We have to remind ourselves what they are talking about!   We usually order the wrong thing a couple of times and then sort it out.

Edited by Hambagahle
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I always thought it was a sign of good service for the waiter to check and make sure that everything is okay after they deliver your meal.  To me, service is lacking if they fail to do this.  Or if they do it so soon after the meal is delivered that I have not had a chance to taste anything yet.

 

The definition of entrée is confusing outside the US, for those of us who live in the US.  It took me a while to figure out why the entrées were all so tiny.  LOL

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4 hours ago, SusieQft said:

I always thought it was a sign of good service for the waiter to check and make sure that everything is okay after they deliver your meal.  To me, service is lacking if they fail to do this.  Or if they do it so soon after the meal is delivered that I have not had a chance to taste anything yet.

 

The definition of entrée is confusing outside the US, for those of us who live in the US.  It took me a while to figure out why the entrées were all so tiny.  LOL

It’s a cultural difference.  In Europe, it is the waiter’s job to scan and notice if something is lacking or if you need something.  They never should intrude on a conversation as conversation is king.   In America, servers are trained to check in and clear plates before the entire table is finished (another pet peeve).  Just remember that in Europe, appetizer = entree.  

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1 hour ago, forgap said:

It’s a cultural difference.  In Europe, it is the waiter’s job to scan and notice if something is lacking or if you need something.

In my experience, 99.9% in the US, waiters usually are not clairvoyant enough to notice that something is lacking unless it is so egregious that I feel compelled to "act out" in my body language.  Maybe European waiters are much better at mind reading, or perhaps European diners are just accustomed to acting out if something is needed.  Any interruption of conversation would be momentary, and the conversation can quickly resume.  For me, this is much easier to deal with than trying to flag down a waiter.  Do you want the waiter to interrupt your conversation to deliver your food?  That takes longer than a quick check if everything is okay.

 

I know that a discussion on Cruise Critic will not change a lifetime of experience and expectations, but I think the majority of Regent passengers are usually from the US, are they not?

Edited by SusieQft
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5 hours ago, forgap said:

The difference may be that in Europe, being a server in a restaurant is a profession.  In the US, for the most part, waiting tables is a job while training for  “real “ job. 

BINGO!!!!!

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