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Day 7 Wednesday Puntarenas, Costa Rica 7 – 7pm

We were still in bed when we arrived this morning and finishing up dinner when the ship set sale so no scenic viewing coming or going.

 

One extra from yesterday – we all received a certificate certifying we were on bord when m/v Island Princess transited the Panama Canal.

 

We have been here twice before (and due again next Jan).  The first time we did a group tour out into the countryside with the highlight being a slow, peaceful mangrove edged river cruise in a boat (about 25 people) through a dense, tropical rainforest that was teeming with colourful, exotic animals out to where the river met the open sea.  The beaches there and in other areas are all black sand.  The tour was great for bird and other wildlife viewing.  We had a nice local lunch there also.  Last time I did a similar tour with Jose's Crocodile River Cruise that started with part of the rain-forest that had a large number of White Face Capuchin monkeys.  Then on to a river boat tour - not sure if same river but if so, it was a different section.  In the boat there was lots of room so most people could switch sides when needed.  The crocodiles in the main area we cruised were mostly 3.5 -5m (12 - 17ft) long.  We were all warmed multiple times to keep all body parts inside the boat - despite that 3 times one of the boat guides got out and fed a crocodile that was on the river bank some chicken parts.  We also saw a Jesus lizard (walks on water), iguanas and red crabs but besides the crocodiles the big draw was the birds - some we saw included Macaw, Tiger Heron, Wood stork, various egrets, Yellow Crested Caracara, spoonbill, ibis and cormorants.  The main difference between the 2 tours was on the first you saw what ever was there at that time while on the second tour besides the crocodile feeding, the guide would use bird calls to attract them and then feed the birds while we took our photos.

 

Today we were docked at a very long pier – there was a shuttle that would take passengers to the end or you could walk.  Princess tour buses drive up the pier to the ship.  Next to us was the Albatros, a Phoenix Raisen cruise line ship.  We had followed it through the Panama Canal.  There was a small tourism desk near the end of the pier.  There is no port building or duty-free shopping.  Licensed tour operators with pre booked groups can come into the pier area but there were unlicensed operators outside looking for passengers (like in many ports they generally have no insurance). 

 

A common phrase here is “pura vida”, literally “pure life”.  It is used as a response for how someone is and also used to say hello, goodbye or life is good (a sign of happiness).  If you ask any Tico (native Costa Rican) how they are, they always answer pura vida with a smile.  I saw it also used on several billboards and other advertising.

 

The city’s main drag, a wide walkway fronting the beach that's jam-packed with places to shop and eat (fresh seafood is very popular), is even called Paseo de los Turistas - loosely, "stroll of the tourists."  Also, in the local area there is the Catholic Cathedral (1902) on the Central Plaza with its Gothic revival architecture and tall bell tower.  The Customs Building, and the Marine History Museum (Museo Historico Marino) – not a lot there which justifies its ‘free’ cost.  Set 2 blocks back from the main harbour terminal is PACIFIC MARINE PARK, a small aquarium featuring about 30 tanks, each with a selection of local Pacific marine life - including some giant manta rays.

 

Freda and I got off the ship around 10 and spent an hour looking around the central area.  Here were a lot of tents set up with vendors offering a very wide range of souvenirs.  We liked the ones that include painted feathers artfully placed to make a scene.  It was very sunny, hot and a bit humid with only the occasional breeze.  After getting her back to the ship I went for a longer walk, heading left off the pier going all the way to the lighthouse at the end of the peninsula. 

 

The beach all the way is a dark brown sand.  To the right of the pier the beach is littered with large quantities of drift wood.  Going the other way, the beach is much better – not perfect but much better.

There were some people swimming in the area close to the port but further down the beach towards the lighthouse there were signs with many ‘Do not Do’ symbols including swimming.

 

The tallest building in town is only 4 stories.  There were only a few independent hotels.  

 

Wheelchair access was good around to part and along the waterfront to the lighthouse but I took a less touristy route back and it was not as good.  For anyone wanting to see how the local people live, it was a very good walk. 

 

For those that enjoy special spa treatments, an option in the rainforest near here is mud baths.  The volcanic mud is believed to hold a range of possible health benefits – everything from softening the skin to improving blood circulation and relieving muscle tension. 

 

Costa Rica produces very high-quality cocoa.  The major area is the southern Caribbean zone but there are locations around the country.  I considered doing a tour to a cocoa plant that would have included a nice tour of the rainforest area but ended up passing on that.

 

On the ship we had a few Frigate birds busing by us frequently.  There were also several pelicans around the ship.

 

The hour we gained getting to Costa Rica did not last long – tonight we lose the hour. 

 

One of our tablemates tonight had her arm in a sling.  She was asked if she had fallen while on the ship.  She said that “No, she had been in a car accident a few days before the cruise started and injured her arm.” 

That got her reminiscing about another accident they were involved in a few years back.

They phoned the local cab company and requested a taxi.  The taxi arrived and the couple opened the front door to leave.  The cat they had put out into the yard scooted back into the house. They didn’t want the cat back in the house because “she” always tries to eat their pet bird.  The wife goes out to the taxi while the husband goes inside to get the cat.  The cat ran upstairs, the man in hot pursuit.  The wife didn’t want the driver to know the house would be empty.  She explained to the driver that her husband would be out soon. “He’s just going upstairs to say goodbye to my mother.”
A few minutes later, the husband got into the cab. “Sorry I took so long,” he says, as they drove away.
“Stupid witch was hiding under the bed.  Had to poke her with a coat hanger to get her to come out!  Then I had to wrap her in a blanket to keep her from scratching me.  But it worked. I hauled her fat a** downstairs and threw her out into the back yard!”
The cabdriver veered off the road and hit a parked car.

 

Today’s thought of the day - "We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open." - Jawaharlal Nehru

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13 hours ago, Waynetor said:

“Stupid witch was hiding under the bed.  Had to poke her with a coat hanger to get her to come out!  Then I had to wrap her in a blanket to keep her from scratching me.  But it worked. I hauled her fat a** downstairs and threw her out into the back yard!”
The cabdriver veered off the road and hit a parked car.

I am rolling on the floor laughing!! Thanks for taking the time to post about your cruise. 
 

Cheers, Denise 

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Day 8 Thursday Ja 16 at sea

As we sail down the west coast of South America, I believe we will not see another cruise ship.  The Holland America Amsterdam is scheduled be at Amalia Glacier the same day as us but as it is only a short scenic cruising, we may not be there the same time.  Once we hit the east coast of South America, we will have company in many ports.

 

Today we passed the Panama Canal area but were too far off shore to see anything.

 

A few days ago we received forms that had to be filled out by today for immigration for both Peru and Chile.

 

In reading our roll call and in talking to passengers the last few days, for many passengers, whether doing the full voyage or just segments, this voyage is a great opportunity to full-fill some bucket list adventures.  Besides all the wonderful ports, there are some options for overnight, overland excursions where passengers get off in 1 port, go to a distant area, and return to the ship at another port.  For me I’m looking forward to seeing some new ports (mainly Easter Island) as well as new experiences in places we have been to before.  A lot of people are concerned about us not being able to do the tender there but we shall see.

 

If you wanted to be entertained tonight its best you liked music – Showtime was a vocalist, Voice of the Ocean had its 2nd audition, there was Famous duets music trivia along with piano deck 5 midship, guitarist/vocalist wheelhouse bar, ballroom dancing wheelhouse bar, music and dancing in Explorers, different music and dancing in wheelhouse and later a DJ in Explorers.

 

While waiting inline at the grill today there was a very self-important college freshman who took it upon himself to explain to a senior citizen in line in front of him why it was impossible for the older generation to understand his own.
"You grew up in a different, actually almost primitive, world," the student said loud enough for the whole line to hear. "We young people today grew up with cell phones, filmless cameras, high speed jet planes and trains, space travel, satellites doing everything, our spaceships have visited Mars... We even have non-polluting energy sources, self driving cars, computers with light-speed processing .... and uh.."
Taking advantage of a pause for breath in the student's litany, the "wizened one" said, "You're right, Son.  We didn't have those things when we were young ... so we invented them ... you arrogant little ****head!!

 

Today’s quote of the day - "Yesterday is a canceled check. Tomorrow is a promissory note. Today is cash in hand. Spend it!" - John W. Newbern

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Day 9 Friday Jan 17 at sea - Crossing the Equator

Besides crossing the equator 6 times on our Oceania world cruise, this is our 4th time on Princess.

 

We had the ceremony this afternoon even though we will not hit the line until around 10pm.  Usually when hopping from port to port along the coast of South America or Africa the equator will be in the middle of the night.  I do recall one time we were sailing northbound between French Polynesia and Hawaii when we crossed early in the afternoon - the Captain came on and announced “if you look about a mile to port side or 2 miles to starboard, you will see the buoys marking the equator”.  He got quite a few to run to the sides of the ship for a look before reality sunk in.

 

I missed seeing the ceremony hosted by King Neptune but was told several passengers and quite a few crew (tadpoles or pollywogs) participated in the ritual making them shellbacks.  The premise of the ceremony is that those who have never previously sailed across the equator are brought before a court headed by King Neptune to be tried for their sins, things like drinking too many free drinks and gluttony and swimming in a Speedo. They are, of course, found guilty.  Punishment varies from cruise to cruise, but seems to always include kissing the traditional fish.  Once reparations have been made, the ship is allowed to cross the equator and continue on its way.  Reports are is was a good job done by the Captain, King Neptune and his crew including the band.

 

From early times, seafarers have participated in ancient ceremonial initiations for crossing specific navigational parallels on the globe.  These practices are so vintage in origin that their derivation has been lost, but it is believed that initiation in such secret societies began in the middle ages.

 

For those not familiar with the Island, the ship has 2 pools on deck 14.  One of the pools has a glass ceiling protecting the area from any adverse weather.  Tonight was the Elite/Platinum Captain Circle party and it was held in that pool area.  The area was packed and it was very hard to get drink refills.  Around 1,200 passengers were Elite/Platinum (I would have thought higher).  The 3rd and 2nd most traveled passengers both had over 1,500 days while the most traveled has 1,955 days.

 

In Manta, Princess is offering a shuttle ticket to town- about 15 minutes away for $10 all day pass.  They can be purchased on the dock but sounds like passengers with pre-purchased tickets get priority. 

 

At dinner tonight one gentleman asked if any of us knew the weather forecast.  I noted I was confident that after diner it would be dark, continuing dark overnight with widely scattered light by early morning."  He thanked me very much.

 

Today’s thought of the day - "If you want to have a great time you will and if you want to have a bad time you will". - Captain Glenn Edvardsen

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Jan 18 Manta, Ecuador intro

Manta possesses the largest seaport in Ecuador. 

 

Tuna fishing and canning is very big business here - it is the self- proclaimed tuna capital of the world.  Other economic activities include tourism and a chemical industry with products from cleaning supplies to oils and margarine.

 

The Malecón Escencio is a strip of restaurants (mostly seafood) and shops right on the water attracting many locals and visitors.  Just pass the seaport near downtown at the “Plaza de la Madre you will find artisans offering many different handmade crafts at a market set up on the Malecón.

 

The port city boasts some wonderful beaches.  Right outside the port there was a fairly decent looking beach.  There were lots of families enjoying being there but not many in the cold water.  Despite being close to the equator, the water stays cold due to currents coming up from the Antarctic.

 

In 2016 the city suffered a devastating earthquake killing about 2,000 of the 250,000 inhabitants.

 

Being only about a half degree south of the equator there is very little difference in day light all year long here.  The average high temperature in January is 30C (86F).  January starts out not averaging very much rain but as the month goes on, the chance of rain increases greatly.  February is the wettest month with 96.5mm (3.8in) of rain.  

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Day 10 Saturday Manta, Ecuador 5 - 7pm

 

We officially crossed the equator after 10 last night.  Some people have reported feeling a bump as we crossed the line but we managed to sleep through it.  When we went to bed it was winter but woke up to a nice summer day.  A good mix of cloud and sun and bit humid.

 

On our previous cruise to this port we did a tour to Agua Blanca, a rural small native settlement.  Very interesting with nice scenic drive.  It included a stop where small fishing boats were bringing in fresh fish as well as the colonial town of Montecristi where the original Panama hats are made.

 

In Montecristi you could see ladies making them and they were available in many local shops in a range of quality/prices.  These light-coloured, lightweight, and breathable hats are often worn as accessories to summer-weight suits.  The tightness, the finesse of the weave, and the time spent in weaving a complete hat out of the toquilla straw (fibres from a palm tree) characterize its quality.  The art of weaving the traditional Ecuadorian toquilla hat was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists on December 6, 2012.  In the first half of the 19th century when the hats were first exported (used by outdoor workers) they were sent to Panama and shipped from there and importers ended up calling them Panama hats.  Beginning around the turn of the 20th century, these hats became popular as tropical and seaside accessories owing to their ease of wear and breathability.

 

A few days before leaving home some passengers received noticed that their coffee and cocoa plantation tour was cancelled due to excessive rain in the area.  Must have been very bad to cancel a tour 2 weeks before and but very nice to let the passengers know ASAP.

 

Today I did a tour organized on the roll call with Narwell tours.  The tour was scheduled for 8:30-4ish with a cost of $70.  Tour is called “The Taste of Ecuador”.  The itinerary:

1.The fish market first thing which they consider to be the engine of the local economy

2.Pacoche National Wildlife Reserve where you would experience the universe of the humid tropical forest with howling monkeys. this is the more strenuous part.  You walk through the area and would be there over an hour.

3.Learn about Ecuadorian revolution at "ciuda Alfaro" museum/mausoleum

4. Shop famous Panama hats/handmade crafts at downtown Montcristi.

 

Review – This was a very busy roll-call tour with 5 vehicles with up to 12 passengers being used.  The fish market gets busy starting around 4am but was still a hive of activity when we got there around 8:30am.  All of the fish are sold the day they are caught.  Next to the market were 8 new wooden ships under construction, each around 30m (100 ft.).  The place was a ghost town when we passed on our return to port.

Added to the tour was a strenuous walk up a mountain to see a lighthouse overlooking the ocean and a nice beach area.  From there we went down to the beach where turtles laid eggs last November – volunteers mark off the area to prevent them being stepped on.

Pacoche National Wildlife Reserve was net – another tough walk.  The was defiantly not a tour for anyone with walking troubles.  We did see a few monkeys but they were too far away, even with a high zoom lens to get good pics.  Lots of interesting plant life there.

Next back to the beach for a very reasonably priced lunch.

At the museum/mausoleum we had a employee explain things to our guide who then translated – no signs in English - seemed interesting but having no background, it was hard to follow most of it.

In Montcristi we had a half hour demo of the hat making procees and what determines quality.  Hats that can be made in a day sell for about $30 while other that can take 4 – 6 months to make a single hat cost over $2,000.

 

There is a lighthouse by the port entrance.  The rocks around it are a gathering place for large numbers of Frigatebird.  When we were here before a large tuna fishing ship was docked next to us and we watched while a crane with a huge net would scoop the frozen fish from the cargo hold and lift them into waiting trucks.  From the port they go to nearby packing plants to be processed and back to the port to be shipped worldwide.  A similar ship could be seen today at a nearby dock.

 

A new cruise terminal was completed in 2018 but cruise ships continue to be surrounded by tuna fishing boats.  You have to take a shuttle to the terminal unless doing a Princess tour in which case you get picked up on the pier.  There were  few vendors and a tour desk in the terminal plus taxis outside. 

 

I believe around a 100 passengers let the ship today for side trips to the Galapagos Is.  Some of those leaving today went on a tour to Machu Pichu.  Either way they left very early – the buffet opened extra early for them.  The Galapagos Is. trip starts with a flight to Quito.  From there another flight to the Galapagos Is where they would board a vessel that sails island to island before returning passengers for a flight to Lima where they will meet up with the Island P.  It only gives a brief taste of the Galapagos Is. but I’m sure they will enjoy it.  

 

Today’s thought of the day - "When you travel, remember that a country is not designed to make you comfortable.  It is designed to make its own people comfortable." - Clifton Fadiman

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On 1/8/2020 at 5:34 PM, Go-Bucks! said:

Waynetor,

 

Glad you started a thread to follow our cruise! I started a thread for the 2019 Oceania 180 day world cruise and it was very active. I did get a chuckle that this thread title says it's a 59 day cruise...guess we added an extra day!🤣

 

I'm definitely not a Princess MTP (114 days on 10 cruises), but I've done 199 days on Oceania in just 5 cruises! 

 

This itinerary sparked my interest over a year ago but I didn't book until last April. I'm happy to get out of winter for a second year in a row!

 

I arrived in Ft. Lauderdale today too. My hotel room is literally right across the road from where the Island will be docked in the morning! Will be fun to wake up, sit on the balcony and watch it arrive.

 

I might not write long posts but will make some contribution to this thread...and add pics too. Look forward to meeting you and your wife tomorrow!

Out of curiosity, which hotel were you in that was right across the road?

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11 hours ago, Waynetor said:

Day 10 Saturday Manta, Ecuador 5 - 7pm

 

We officially crossed the equator after 10 last night.  Some people have reported feeling a bump as we crossed the line but we managed to sleep through it.  When we went to bed it was winter but woke up to a nice summer day.  A good mix of cloud and sun and bit humid.

 

On our previous cruise to this port we did a tour to Agua Blanca, a rural small native settlement.  Very interesting with nice scenic drive.  It included a stop where small fishing boats were bringing in fresh fish as well as the colonial town of Montecristi where the original Panama hats are made.

 

In Montecristi you could see ladies making them and they were available in many local shops in a range of quality/prices.  These light-coloured, lightweight, and breathable hats are often worn as accessories to summer-weight suits.  The tightness, the finesse of the weave, and the time spent in weaving a complete hat out of the toquilla straw (fibres from a palm tree) characterize its quality.  The art of weaving the traditional Ecuadorian toquilla hat was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists on December 6, 2012.  In the first half of the 19th century when the hats were first exported (used by outdoor workers) they were sent to Panama and shipped from there and importers ended up calling them Panama hats.  Beginning around the turn of the 20th century, these hats became popular as tropical and seaside accessories owing to their ease of wear and breathability.

 

A few days before leaving home some passengers received noticed that their coffee and cocoa plantation tour was cancelled due to excessive rain in the area.  Must have been very bad to cancel a tour 2 weeks before and but very nice to let the passengers know ASAP.

 

Today I did a tour organized on the roll call with Narwell tours.  The tour was scheduled for 8:30-4ish with a cost of $70.  Tour is called “The Taste of Ecuador”.  The itinerary:

1.The fish market first thing which they consider to be the engine of the local economy

2.Pacoche National Wildlife Reserve where you would experience the universe of the humid tropical forest with howling monkeys. this is the more strenuous part.  You walk through the area and would be there over an hour.

3.Learn about Ecuadorian revolution at "ciuda Alfaro" museum/mausoleum

4. Shop famous Panama hats/handmade crafts at downtown Montcristi.

 

Review – This was a very busy roll-call tour with 5 vehicles with up to 12 passengers being used.  The fish market gets busy starting around 4am but was still a hive of activity when we got there around 8:30am.  All of the fish are sold the day they are caught.  Next to the market were 8 new wooden ships under construction, each around 30m (100 ft.).  The place was a ghost town when we passed on our return to port.

Added to the tour was a strenuous walk up a mountain to see a lighthouse overlooking the ocean and a nice beach area.  From there we went down to the beach where turtles laid eggs last November – volunteers mark off the area to prevent them being stepped on.

Pacoche National Wildlife Reserve was net – another tough walk.  The was defiantly not a tour for anyone with walking troubles.  We did see a few monkeys but they were too far away, even with a high zoom lens to get good pics.  Lots of interesting plant life there.

Next back to the beach for a very reasonably priced lunch.

At the museum/mausoleum we had a employee explain things to our guide who then translated – no signs in English - seemed interesting but having no background, it was hard to follow most of it.

In Montcristi we had a half hour demo of the hat making procees and what determines quality.  Hats that can be made in a day sell for about $30 while other that can take 4 – 6 months to make a single hat cost over $2,000.

 

There is a lighthouse by the port entrance.  The rocks around it are a gathering place for large numbers of Frigatebird.  When we were here before a large tuna fishing ship was docked next to us and we watched while a crane with a huge net would scoop the frozen fish from the cargo hold and lift them into waiting trucks.  From the port they go to nearby packing plants to be processed and back to the port to be shipped worldwide.  A similar ship could be seen today at a nearby dock.

 

A new cruise terminal was completed in 2018 but cruise ships continue to be surrounded by tuna fishing boats.  You have to take a shuttle to the terminal unless doing a Princess tour in which case you get picked up on the pier.  There were  few vendors and a tour desk in the terminal plus taxis outside. 

 

I believe around a 100 passengers let the ship today for side trips to the Galapagos Is.  Some of those leaving today went on a tour to Machu Pichu.  Either way they left very early – the buffet opened extra early for them.  The Galapagos Is. trip starts with a flight to Quito.  From there another flight to the Galapagos Is where they would board a vessel that sails island to island before returning passengers for a flight to Lima where they will meet up with the Island P.  It only gives a brief taste of the Galapagos Is. but I’m sure they will enjoy it.  

 

Today’s thought of the day - "When you travel, remember that a country is not designed to make you comfortable.  It is designed to make its own people comfortable." - Clifton Fadiman

Thank you for telling us all about your cruise.  I have dreamed of us doing this cruise for years.  I had not realized we could also see the Galapagos while on this cruise.  How many days and ports will those passengers miss of your cruise by taking their side trip?

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Did you book all the cruises separate, or did you book as one? I'm curious as to what you paid for internet. We booked a B2B 10/15 and it looks like with our minutes and if we can combine cruises our 25 day will be $112.50 from a post from another CC poster. Did you end up paying $150 for your 31+ day cruise?   

   Mahalo

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Day 11 Sunday Ja 19 at sea

Today was the first of 2 sea days as we sail to Lima averaging 14 knots.  A great day to spend some time relaxing and enjoying the summer weather.  It was pure sunshine until around 3 when it quickly clouded over.  Despite being close to the equator the temp was only 24C (75F) and felt a bit cooler due to the chilly breeze thanks to the Humboldt current that brings cool water from the Antarctic and chilling the air.  

 

At lunch today we went to the Bayou Café for their New Orleans style pub lunch.  Options included Chicken wings, Lobster cake, breaded seafood cake, and grilled cheese chorizo sandwich.  I prefer the English pup lunch on other ships but the restaurant was busy.  

 

This afternoon everyone received a form letter from the Captain regarding the number of reports armed robbery and other crimes against tourist in Callao where we dock Tuesday and Lima.

The recommendation list for tourist there (as in other cities) were:

Travel with others and stay in public places, avoiding large crowds if possible.

Dress conservatively and minimize the amount of jewelry worn

Take care of handbags, cameras, and other valuables

Be aware of surroundings and people around you

Use discretion when handling cash publicly, limit amount of cash you carry, and separate money for large/small purchases to avoid showing large amount of cash.

If confronted by a criminal remember valuable can be replaced

Be especially careful when visiting the main tourist sites in Lima such as Plaza de Armas, the Plaza San Martin, Acho bullring and Pachacamac

Visitors to outlying areas in the vicinity of Incan ruins in large groups with a certified guide.

 

The note said that due to the concerns the shuttle bus will run and from the Real Plaza Salaverry with details to follow tomorrow.

 

Both NLF games were available on the Muts screen but not a lot of people watching.

 

One thing we are really enjoying on this cruise in the lack of announcements.  There is a daily ‘officer of the watch’ update at noon but today was the first time I heard an announcement from the CD,  On some of the cruises we did last winter beside the CD doing at least 2 per day, there would be 2 for every art event, plus bingo and some Effy events.

 

It is a 4 day side trip to Galapagos.

 

I get 500 minutes free internet and will look at packages once I near the end of that  

 

Today’s thought of the day - Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends. - Maya Angelou

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On 1/8/2020 at 4:16 PM, Waynetor said:

Welcome to my “Live From” travelogue of the fabulous Island Princess 59-day circle South America cruise. 

 

The last 2 winters my wife and I have spent a good part of the winter bouncing around the Caribbean doing multiple cruises on multiple Princess ships.  We were planning to do the same again this winter when I came across this voyage.  My wife needs an accessible cabin and every time last spring when I checked they were all booked.  Finally, I talked to a cruise travel agent I had used before and in a couple hours we had a cabin.

 

To start I’ll give a little of our personal history in order to give some perspective of where we are coming from an experience point.  We are a couple of Canadians, lifelong in Toronto, 66 and 64 years old.  Our first cruise was a 5-day Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean in 2000.  We now have 1 Carnival, 4 RCI, 1 180-day world cruise on Oceania as well as 46 Princess cruises with Princess totaling 496 days. 

 

My wife (Freda) will be using a wheelchair around the ship and in ports.  We recognize how very fortunate we are to be able to still have cruising as part of our lives.  For her, much of this voyage this will simply be a wonderful escape from winter weather as she will be staying on the ship in most ports.

 

My hope is that through this travelogue readers will get an idea of what experiencing a grand voyage is like and that you will feel that you are actually experiencing part of this special journey with us.  Hopefully for those planning a similar future adventure it will also help them.  Maybe with this report I can convey some of our impressions and take you with me to South America.  Maybe it entices you to go and experience the excitement of this journey yourself.  It's all part of the payback for all the help I've received here on Cruise Critic. 

 

Some of my post will be on the long side but for me it serves as a permanent record which I need considering I have a photographic memory but with the lens cap glued on. 

 

We get some free internet as Princess elite members, but on a long voyage (3 segments) the minutes go fast so I will start with a few post in order to get some details out of the way.

Wonderful to take these voyages while you can.  Happy for your wife, Freda, too, given she has some limitations but still able to travel with you at her side.  My wife's name was Freda, same spelling, and she worshipped her days on board several cruise lines.  She was called away in January, 2019, the disease Parkinson at its worst.  I miss her everyday and at this moment, too.

 

I love Princess and just completed the SF to Hawaii and back in November last on board Grand.  I chose a suite, center ship, Carib deck and took my son and daughter with me.  I am now booked for the July 2020 cruise SH to NY on Island by way of Shetland Islands, Iceland, Greenland, Halifax, and NY.  Again a suite, center ship, Carib deck with only my daughter this time.

 

I am anxious to read about your experiences doing the 59 day loop around South America.

 

Jack in California

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Day 12 Monday Ja 20 at sea

 

Nice day at sea – mostly sunny and light winds with waves no more than 1m (3ft).

 

The lecturers that have been on since Ft. Lauderdale are wrapping up their time with us and are leaving in Lima along with the 2 entertainers we picked up in Costa Rico.  Yesterday we went to a lecture on ‘Ocean Liner to Meg ship’ covering about 180 years of moving passengers around.  I’ve been to a very similar presentation before but still very interesting to see how time and events have led to the cruise business we now enjoy.

 

I’ve mentioned in the last couple days about some passengers doing side trips.  If planning to do such a trip privately where returning to a different country than from where you left defiantly need to be cleared with the front-desk – even if returning to the same country they need to know so you are not considered missing.  Either way, it is not an issue of big brother giving permission but immigration and custom issues that need to be cleared.

 

We received a note today outlining shuttles for the 2 days in Lima.  The free shuttle will take 45 – 60 minutes each way.  Going to Lima tickets will be given out starting at 7am but you need to be ready when you pick up your ticket.  Tomorrow from 7am – 9pm and Wed. from 8am – 8:30pm shuttles will go to Real Plaza Salaverry which is a 5 level complex, 100 store mall.  Overnight from 9pm to 7:30 am the drop off is Larcomar Shopping Mall in Miraflores.

 

Tonight we sat at a table for 6.  As we finished our wonderful dinner one of the gentlemen tried to discretely point out to his wife that she had some food on her left cheek.  She picked up on the hint but rubbed her right cheek.  He tried to correct her by loudly whispering “no the other side”, so she reached into her mouth and rubbed the inside of her right cheek.

 

Today’s thought of the day - Time you enjoy wasting was not wasted – John Lennon

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On 1/19/2020 at 2:09 PM, Yehootu said:

Did you book all the cruises separate, or did you book as one? I'm curious as to what you paid for internet. We booked a B2B 10/15 and it looks like with our minutes and if we can combine cruises our 25 day will be $112.50 from a post from another CC poster. Did you end up paying $150 for your 31+ day cruise?   

   Mahalo

Screen Shot 2020-01-02 at 8.14.51 AM.png

 

 

It seem now no matter how you book (one segment or multiple) the system recognizes the total time you are on ship.  We just got off a b2b of 16 and 14 days.  When we got on internet showed wifi package for entire 30 days.  Our CC loyalty minutes only said 250 min instead of what we would get for each leg.  Talking with internet manager he said if we go with our free min he will correct it. But we bought the unlimited for a reduced rate for entire time.  Note we could not buy unlimited for just one of the legs.  This is the third b2b this year where it has beem like this.  

 

Hope this helps

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On 1/17/2020 at 1:48 AM, Waynetor said:


Taking advantage of a pause for breath in the student's litany, the "wizened one" said, "You're right, Son.  We didn't have those things when we were young ... so we invented them ... you arrogant little ****head!!

 

 

 

Impressive !! 

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