Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
Please look for and post on existing COVID-19 threads before posting a new one.
cl.klink

Lot's of scooter questions - first timer

Recommended Posts

DW is now limited in ambulation due to medical problems, can walk a bit at home with a cane, but can't walk enough for a cruise anymore, neither for getting around the ship nor for most ports.  She can walk with a cane for for 50-100 feet or so on flat surfaces.  Our last cruise (September 2019) became more than she could handle.  She has worsened.  She has loved cruising, and travel in general,  and I want her to be able to keep going as long as she can, while she still can.  So, I decided to get her a scooter.  I have questions I hope you all can help with by sharing your experiences, opinions, advice.  I apologize for a lot of questions, but here goes.

 

1.  I know I can rent but I think I want to buy.  I plan to buy a scooter we can fold, but just for my information, how wide are the doorways of most regular staterooms? 

 

2. I'm planning on a fold-able more light weight scooter (e.g. TravelScoot, Triaxe).  What do you think of those?

 

3.  How does it go if we take a scooter like this into ports?  Would cabs be OK with us putting it in trunk?  What do you do if you want to pop into a shop or restaurant -- can you bring it in?  I know there are going to be a variety of responses, but I want to know what your experiences have been trying to do these things.  I want to know what to plan.

 

4.  Can you bring a scooter like this through airport security and to the gate, and then gate check?  Or, should we just have an aiport person transport us by wheelchair (like we've done so far), and send the scooter through as checked baggage?  What have you done and what are your experiences?

 

5. Similarly, how do we get a scooter like this onto the ship?  Do we just take it on, past security, and go on in?  Do we need to notify the cruise company?

 

6.  On the ship, if we go to a dinner or the theater etc., what do we do with the scooter?  She can walk a short distance if needed, but if needed, what do we do with the scooter?

 

7.  I followed earlier threads where people objected to those who leave scooters in hallways, or who bump into others.  This may seem silly of us, but if we behave well, don't make these errors, are we nonetheless risking the scorn of fellow cruisers now?  I don't want DW to feel intimidated by taking this step.  We love cruising in part because we like being a part of the gang at sea -- will we now feel like pariahs?  I'm curious what people have experienced.

 

Thanks in advance for any responses,

 

- Joel

Edited by cl.klink
typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a travelscoot scooter for over 10 years but have now "graduated" to a fold-and-go wheelchair. After buying other mobility aids that were not ideal, my best experience was getting a referral to a physical therapist who listened to me explain my needs and then did a series of exercises before suggesting equipment that meets my needs. 

 

I chose (and it was a choice) to put my scooter in a case and check it to the final destination. This worked OK but I was always concerned if it would show up. Now having a wheelchair, I gate check the chair and that is easier for me. The primary problem I had with the scooter was as my balance deteriorated I found it much more difficult to step over the center section. Now, using the wheelchair that is not a problem and it feels much safer having four rather than three wheels.

I have no idea how wide the doors on a standard cabin are as I must have the zero entry bath and extra bars provided in the accessible bath. Within the room I use a walker unless the seas are rough. I use my wheelchair to board and exit the ship. I am always assisted by ship crew. I no longer tender.

I hope to continue to travel and wish you and your DW well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, katisdale said:

I used a travelscoot scooter for over 10 years but have now "graduated" to a fold-and-go wheelchair. After buying other mobility aids that were not ideal, my best experience was getting a referral to a physical therapist who listened to me explain my needs and then did a series of exercises before suggesting equipment that meets my needs. 

 

I chose (and it was a choice) to put my scooter in a case and check it to the final destination. This worked OK but I was always concerned if it would show up. Now having a wheelchair, I gate check the chair and that is easier for me. The primary problem I had with the scooter was as my balance deteriorated I found it much more difficult to step over the center section. Now, using the wheelchair that is not a problem and it feels much safer having four rather than three wheels.

I have no idea how wide the doors on a standard cabin are as I must have the zero entry bath and extra bars provided in the accessible bath. Within the room I use a walker unless the seas are rough. I use my wheelchair to board and exit the ship. I am always assisted by ship crew. I no longer tender.

I hope to continue to travel and wish you and your DW well.

 

Thanks very much

- Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

            

 

1.  I know I can rent but I think I want to buy.  I plan to buy a scooter we can fold, but just for my information, how wide are the doorways of most regular staterooms?   I have rented, owned a 3 wheel scooter and now have a forcemech power wheelchair.  If you rent, I don’t believe the Scootaround store will allow you to have a scooter in a non-accessible cabin. There are several issues. Even if it will fit through the door you may not be able to steer it through the hallway and make the turn.  If you can walk into the room, can your traveling companion get it through the door? Once you get it in the cabin where do you store it?  Mine folds up like a lawn chair. It weighs 60 pounds. It uses lithium batteries and will go at least all day. It will exhaust anyone with me if they try to keep up. I think it’s rated range is like 16 miles. Much better than my pride scooter which was rated for four and I was lucky to get two.. The scooter seldom made it whole day without taking time to charge. Of course that is dependent on the weight of the rider and the terrain.  For some reason the carpet on the ships I’ve been on really seem to wear the battery out fast.  With that said it seems inconvenient but I could not cruise without it. I can get around the house with a walker and I use a walker in the cabin but I’m only good for maybe 25 to 30 feet before I need to rest.          I’m much happier With the folding power chair. It is significantly more expensive but I use it every day. But I think somebody gave the advice of seeing a physical therapist and getting their recommendations and I think that’s a great idea.

 

2. I'm planning on a fold-able more light weight scooter (e.g. TravelScoot, Triaxe).  What do you think of those?  I have no experience with those but I do see a lot of them on the ships and people seem happy with them. Most of them have small seats. To put it politely, I have a large rear end and I don’t think they would be comfortable for me long-term.  

 

3.  How does it go if we take a scooter like this into ports?  Would cabs be OK with us putting it in trunk?  What do you do if you want to pop into a shop or restaurant -- can you bring it in?  I know there are going to be a variety of responses, but I want to know what your experiences have been trying to do these things.  I want to know what to plan.  I have always been able to find a taxi that will allow me to put the folding chair in the back.  If my wife helps,  the taxi driver has never had a problem lifting it into the back of the vehicle.  Sometimes they charge, sometimes they don’t in the US.  In the Caribbean always get the price before you get in the car.  Don’t know about Europe or Asia or Australia since I won’t stay in a plane that long. Some ports are more wheelchair friendly than others. I have learned to hate cobblestones. Also be aware that on some ships if it’s a tender Port they may not let you take the powerwheelchair or scooter off the ship.

 

4.  Can you bring a scooter like this through airport security and to the gate, and then gate check?  Or, should we just have an aiport person transport us by wheelchair (like we've done so far), and send the scooter through as checked baggage?  What have you done and what are your experiences?  Once we got our own scooter we have always taken it all the way to the gate and gate checked.  They take it as I get to the airplane door.  I then hold onto the plane, seat back, my wife, and get to my seat.  If I fly a carrier that has it we take First or premium class so that the seat is in the front of the plane.  On Southwest they usually let wheelchairs board first.  Then when we get off the plane it’s waiting in the jet way for us. Usually first on last off.

 

5. Similarly, how do we get a scooter like this onto the ship?  Do we just take it on, past security, and go on in?  Do we need to notify the cruise company?  I’ve never had a problem getting the wheelchair onto the ship.  They’ve always been ramps and elevators.

 

6.  On the ship, if we go to a dinner or the theater etc., what do we do with the scooter?  She can walk a short distance if needed, but if needed, what do we do with the scooter?  There are specific sites in the theater where you can park the wheelchair and see the show. In the dining room I’ve done it both ways depending on how I’m feeling that day. I’ve taking the wheelchair in and just sat in it while they take a regular chair away. I’ve also gone to the table transferred to a chair and one of the waiters or bus boys will take the chair and store it for me. They actually seem to get a kick out of driving it around

 

7.  I followed earlier threads where people objected to those who leave scooters in hallways, or who bump into others.  This may seem silly of us, but if we behave well, don't make these errors, are we nonetheless risking the scorn of fellow cruisers now?  I don't want DW to feel intimidated by taking this step.  We love cruising in part because we like being a part of the gang at sea -- will we now feel like pariahs?  I'm curious what people have experienced.  Most people on the ship are very sympathetic and helpful. There’s always one or two bad apples.  They don’t jump ahead of you or ignore because you are in a wheelchair they’re just that way.       But for the most part it’s not an issue.

 

We travel quite a bit because I enjoy it.  If you are in a wheelchair depending on the ship, it’s the greatest vacation.  I found a line that I like and has great cabins for accessibility. I particularly enjoy the power doors. That way my wife can help me get dressed then go back to bed.  I can wander off to breakfast, pool,  lounge or the coffee shop and she can do what she wants.  In the land vacation she’s always afraid I’ll get lost or not be able to get somewhere because it’s not as accessible as it should be or the battery will die and I won’t be able to get back.  Also I found on land vacations accessibility means different things to different hotels. My favorite was hotel in Miami. The room itself was great huge bathroom easy to turn around in but the entry door wasn’t wide enough to get the chair in. So every time we left and returned I had to get out of the chair then she had to fold it up and roll it into the room.   On a cruise we have a specific line of ship and we know the features of the room and that it works for me.  This cruise line moves it ships around a lot so we get to see a lot of different islands depending on which week we go.  Assuming it’s available I would contact the special-needs area of whatever line you are thinking about to ensure it meets your needs. For instance, I need to use a recliner to help reduce the swelling in my legs.. I usually rent my recliner‘s from the vendor the cruise line recommends.  There’s one line that will not allow me to bring a recliner on board.  Luckily I checked before I booked the cabin.         

 

PS, we are almost neighbors, we live at Lake of the Ozarks.  We are often in Columbia since many of my doctors are in university hospital.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Mosttoyswin said:

            

 

1.  I know I can rent but I think I want to buy.  I plan to buy a scooter we can fold, but just for my information, how wide are the doorways of most regular staterooms?   I have rented, owned a 3 wheel scooter and now have a forcemech power wheelchair.  If you rent, I don’t believe the Scootaround store will allow you to have a scooter in a non-accessible cabin. There are several issues. Even if it will fit through the door you may not be able to steer it through the hallway and make the turn.  If you can walk into the room, can your traveling companion get it through the door? Once you get it in the cabin where do you store it?  Mine folds up like a lawn chair. It weighs 60 pounds. It uses lithium batteries and will go at least all day. It will exhaust anyone with me if they try to keep up. I think it’s rated range is like 16 miles. Much better than my pride scooter which was rated for four and I was lucky to get two.. The scooter seldom made it whole day without taking time to charge. Of course that is dependent on the weight of the rider and the terrain.  For some reason the carpet on the ships I’ve been on really seem to wear the battery out fast.  With that said it seems inconvenient but I could not cruise without it. I can get around the house with a walker and I use a walker in the cabin but I’m only good for maybe 25 to 30 feet before I need to rest.          I’m much happier With the folding power chair. It is significantly more expensive but I use it every day. But I think somebody gave the advice of seeing a physical therapist and getting their recommendations and I think that’s a great idea.

 

2. I'm planning on a fold-able more light weight scooter (e.g. TravelScoot, Triaxe).  What do you think of those?  I have no experience with those but I do see a lot of them on the ships and people seem happy with them. Most of them have small seats. To put it politely, I have a large rear end and I don’t think they would be comfortable for me long-term.  

 

3.  How does it go if we take a scooter like this into ports?  Would cabs be OK with us putting it in trunk?  What do you do if you want to pop into a shop or restaurant -- can you bring it in?  I know there are going to be a variety of responses, but I want to know what your experiences have been trying to do these things.  I want to know what to plan.  I have always been able to find a taxi that will allow me to put the folding chair in the back.  If my wife helps,  the taxi driver has never had a problem lifting it into the back of the vehicle.  Sometimes they charge, sometimes they don’t in the US.  In the Caribbean always get the price before you get in the car.  Don’t know about Europe or Asia or Australia since I won’t stay in a plane that long. Some ports are more wheelchair friendly than others. I have learned to hate cobblestones. Also be aware that on some ships if it’s a tender Port they may not let you take the powerwheelchair or scooter off the ship.

 

4.  Can you bring a scooter like this through airport security and to the gate, and then gate check?  Or, should we just have an aiport person transport us by wheelchair (like we've done so far), and send the scooter through as checked baggage?  What have you done and what are your experiences?  Once we got our own scooter we have always taken it all the way to the gate and gate checked.  They take it as I get to the airplane door.  I then hold onto the plane, seat back, my wife, and get to my seat.  If I fly a carrier that has it we take First or premium class so that the seat is in the front of the plane.  On Southwest they usually let wheelchairs board first.  Then when we get off the plane it’s waiting in the jet way for us. Usually first on last off.

 

5. Similarly, how do we get a scooter like this onto the ship?  Do we just take it on, past security, and go on in?  Do we need to notify the cruise company?  I’ve never had a problem getting the wheelchair onto the ship.  They’ve always been ramps and elevators.

 

6.  On the ship, if we go to a dinner or the theater etc., what do we do with the scooter?  She can walk a short distance if needed, but if needed, what do we do with the scooter?  There are specific sites in the theater where you can park the wheelchair and see the show. In the dining room I’ve done it both ways depending on how I’m feeling that day. I’ve taking the wheelchair in and just sat in it while they take a regular chair away. I’ve also gone to the table transferred to a chair and one of the waiters or bus boys will take the chair and store it for me. They actually seem to get a kick out of driving it around

 

7.  I followed earlier threads where people objected to those who leave scooters in hallways, or who bump into others.  This may seem silly of us, but if we behave well, don't make these errors, are we nonetheless risking the scorn of fellow cruisers now?  I don't want DW to feel intimidated by taking this step.  We love cruising in part because we like being a part of the gang at sea -- will we now feel like pariahs?  I'm curious what people have experienced.  Most people on the ship are very sympathetic and helpful. There’s always one or two bad apples.  They don’t jump ahead of you or ignore because you are in a wheelchair they’re just that way.       But for the most part it’s not an issue.

 

We travel quite a bit because I enjoy it.  If you are in a wheelchair depending on the ship, it’s the greatest vacation.  I found a line that I like and has great cabins for accessibility. I particularly enjoy the power doors. That way my wife can help me get dressed then go back to bed.  I can wander off to breakfast, pool,  lounge or the coffee shop and she can do what she wants.  In the land vacation she’s always afraid I’ll get lost or not be able to get somewhere because it’s not as accessible as it should be or the battery will die and I won’t be able to get back.  Also I found on land vacations accessibility means different things to different hotels. My favorite was hotel in Miami. The room itself was great huge bathroom easy to turn around in but the entry door wasn’t wide enough to get the chair in. So every time we left and returned I had to get out of the chair then she had to fold it up and roll it into the room.   On a cruise we have a specific line of ship and we know the features of the room and that it works for me.  This cruise line moves it ships around a lot so we get to see a lot of different islands depending on which week we go.  Assuming it’s available I would contact the special-needs area of whatever line you are thinking about to ensure it meets your needs. For instance, I need to use a recliner to help reduce the swelling in my legs.. I usually rent my recliner‘s from the vendor the cruise line recommends.  There’s one line that will not allow me to bring a recliner on board.  Luckily I checked before I booked the cabin.         

 

PS, we are almost neighbors, we live at Lake of the Ozarks.  We are often in Columbia since many of my doctors are in university hospital.

 

This is a wonderful and detailed response and I do so very much appreciate.  I work at MU Hospital, so maybe our paths will cross one day.

 

All the best,

 

- Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you see someone wandering around in a black and yellow power chair it’s probably me.  Stop me and say hi.

6A099861-2FEB-459D-BF64-02D05EBA6242.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel,

If your wife is going to depend on a scooter for getting around not only on cruises but even at home for shopping and going out to dinner, I think it is best to buy a scooter.  I have owned my scooter for about 4 years and have used it on cruises as well as outings like Disneyland and Sea World.  I have no experience with the different brands other than the one I bought which is an EV Rider.  They are available at many Medical supply stores but I bought mine from a well known shopping network.  I'm not sure I can name the specific network.  Once you identify the network, you can view several detailed video reviews on their network. I have been very happy with my collapsible scooter. In fact, if it becomes necessary, I will probably purchase another one.  They have made significant "comfort feature" changes since I purchased mine.  They now have one that folds automatically instead of manually.  The measurements while folded are 18" (h);  31" (l) and 19" (w).  We have never had issues in getting it into our cabin---(folded).   The weight is about 45 lbs. without the battery and some of new models the weight is around 46 lbs. with the battery.  

 

As far as flying with the scooter, my experience has been the same as the other posters.  I ride it up to the door of the airplane where airline personal take it down to the cargo bay and then return it to me at the end of the flight.

 

I am also "thin skinned" when using it on cruises.  I'm so concerned that I will run into someone or run over their toes in an elevator that it really stresses me out.  I have to admit that for the most part fellow cruisers are thoughtful and courteous when I approach them.  

 

I am going to try and post a couple pictures of my scooter.  I hope you and your wife have many more fun cruises in your future...

 

Ray

 

 

DSCN1096.JPG

DSCN1099.JPG

DSCN1100.JPG

IMG_0082.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, rfkeith10 said:

Joel,

If your wife is going to depend on a scooter for getting around not only on cruises but even at home for shopping and going out to dinner, I think it is best to buy a scooter.  I have owned my scooter for about 4 years and have used it on cruises as well as outings like Disneyland and Sea World.  I have no experience with the different brands other than the one I bought which is an EV Rider.  They are available at many Medical supply stores but I bought mine from a well known shopping network.  I'm not sure I can name the specific network.  Once you identify the network, you can view several detailed video reviews on their network. I have been very happy with my collapsible scooter. In fact, if it becomes necessary, I will probably purchase another one.  They have made significant "comfort feature" changes since I purchased mine.  They now have one that folds automatically instead of manually.  The measurements while folded are 18" (h);  31" (l) and 19" (w).  We have never had issues in getting it into our cabin---(folded).   The weight is about 45 lbs. without the battery and some of new models the weight is around 46 lbs. with the battery.  

 

As far as flying with the scooter, my experience has been the same as the other posters.  I ride it up to the door of the airplane where airline personal take it down to the cargo bay and then return it to me at the end of the flight.

 

I am also "thin skinned" when using it on cruises.  I'm so concerned that I will run into someone or run over their toes in an elevator that it really stresses me out.  I have to admit that for the most part fellow cruisers are thoughtful and courteous when I approach them.  

 

I am going to try and post a couple pictures of my scooter.  I hope you and your wife have many more fun cruises in your future...

 

Ray

 

 

DSCN1096.JPG

DSCN1099.JPG

DSCN1100.JPG

IMG_0082.JPG

 

Ray,'

 

This is very helpful. Thanks.

 

When it's folded up, you can place it in a car trunk OK, then?

 

- Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There should not be any reason not to name who you bought from.  We just can’t list travel agents.  🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Algebralovr said:

There should not be any reason not to name who you bought from.  We just can’t list travel agents.  🙂

You are probably right,,,as many of you know, the shopping network I am talking about is QVC.  For anyone who is looking for a foldable Scooter you might want to check out QVC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cl.klink said:

 

Ray,'

 

This is very helpful. Thanks.

 

When it's folded up, you can place it in a car trunk OK, then?

 

- Joel

Absolutely.  I’m 73 and my balance is so bad that I can’t lift it into the trunk but Teresia is able to with minimal effort.  I purchased my scooter from QVC.  If you access their website and search EV Rider, you will see the models available, along with some videos of QVC’s on air presentations.  Good luck with what ever scooter you decide to buy.

 

Ray

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, cl.klink said:

7.  I followed earlier threads where people objected to those who leave scooters in hallways, or who bump into others.  This may seem silly of us, but if we behave well, don't make these errors, are we nonetheless risking the scorn of fellow cruisers now?  I don't want DW to feel intimidated by taking this step.  We love cruising in part because we like being a part of the gang at sea -- will we now feel like pariahs?  I'm curious what people have experienced.

 

I can't speak to your other questions as I rent a scooter that doesn't fold up. However, on question 7, please tell your wife to take the scooter and enjoy the freedom it gives her. As long as she's not (literally) ramming into people and following the rules about not leaving it in the hallway, she deserves to enjoy her vacation as much as anyone else on the ship. There are always going to be some people who will be snotty about something or another. Don't worry about them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2020 at 4:21 PM, cl.klink said:

DW is now limited in ambulation due to medical problems, can walk a bit at home with a cane, but can't walk enough for a cruise anymore, neither for getting around the ship nor for most ports.  She can walk with a cane for for 50-100 feet or so on flat surfaces.  Our last cruise (September 2019) became more than she could handle.  She has worsened.  She has loved cruising, and travel in general,  and I want her to be able to keep going as long as she can, while she still can.  So, I decided to get her a scooter.  I have questions I hope you all can help with by sharing your experiences, opinions, advice.  I apologize for a lot of questions, but here goes.

 

1.  I know I can rent but I think I want to buy.  I plan to buy a scooter we can fold, but just for my information, how wide are the doorways of most regular staterooms? 

 

2. I'm planning on a fold-able more light weight scooter (e.g. TravelScoot, Triaxe).  What do you think of those?

 

3.  How does it go if we take a scooter like this into ports?  Would cabs be OK with us putting it in trunk?  What do you do if you want to pop into a shop or restaurant -- can you bring it in?  I know there are going to be a variety of responses, but I want to know what your experiences have been trying to do these things.  I want to know what to plan.

 

4.  Can you bring a scooter like this through airport security and to the gate, and then gate check?  Or, should we just have an aiport person transport us by wheelchair (like we've done so far), and send the scooter through as checked baggage?  What have you done and what are your experiences?

 

5. Similarly, how do we get a scooter like this onto the ship?  Do we just take it on, past security, and go on in?  Do we need to notify the cruise company?

 

6.  On the ship, if we go to a dinner or the theater etc., what do we do with the scooter?  She can walk a short distance if needed, but if needed, what do we do with the scooter?

 

7.  I followed earlier threads where people objected to those who leave scooters in hallways, or who bump into others.  This may seem silly of us, but if we behave well, don't make these errors, are we nonetheless risking the scorn of fellow cruisers now?  I don't want DW to feel intimidated by taking this step.  We love cruising in part because we like being a part of the gang at sea -- will we now feel like pariahs?  I'm curious what people have experienced.

 

Thanks in advance for any responses,

 

- Joel

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my experience has been. i would much rather tell airlines that i need wheelchair assistance and have one of the handlers push me around the airport. its simple. when i go w/my on own scooter, i dont know where im goin. a handler picks you right up at check in and brings you to airline departure gate. sometimes the airport is so large (miami), you dont know where you're goin. these transporters get you there no fuss. no muss. well worth whatever you want to tip them.  i rent a scooter to be on the ship. never had a problem. whatever scooter make sure that it folds. most buses will take the scooter as long as it folds. the ship also has an area for handicapped where you wait for transport and its wonderful. again they take you right to your room. then get the scooter and you're on your own. as for dinner we usually leave the scooter by the entrance to the restaurant. as i can walk to our table w/o difficulty but cant stand a longer period of time. the theater usually has an area in the back where you can stay on the scooter or sit in a chair.  no you cannot leave a scooter in the halls. as for excursions, as long as the bus will take the scooter, you will have no problem. you might not see everything, but you will see as much as possible. dont be afraid to rent a scooter and use it. you're only limited by your imagination and what you're willing to try

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2020 at 5:55 PM, 1threadshort said:

my experience has been. i would much rather tell airlines that i need wheelchair assistance and have one of the handlers push me around the airport. its simple. when i go w/my on own scooter, i dont know where im goin. a handler picks you right up at check in and brings you to airline departure gate. sometimes the airport is so large (miami), you dont know where you're goin. these transporters get you there no fuss. no muss. well worth whatever you want to tip them.  i rent a scooter to be on the ship. never had a problem. whatever scooter make sure that it folds. most buses will take the scooter as long as it folds. the ship also has an area for handicapped where you wait for transport and its wonderful. again they take you right to your room. then get the scooter and you're on your own. as for dinner we usually leave the scooter by the entrance to the restaurant. as i can walk to our table w/o difficulty but cant stand a longer period of time. the theater usually has an area in the back where you can stay on the scooter or sit in a chair.  no you cannot leave a scooter in the halls. as for excursions, as long as the bus will take the scooter, you will have no problem. you might not see everything, but you will see as much as possible. dont be afraid to rent a scooter and use it. you're only limited by your imagination and what you're willing to try

 

Thanks very much,

 

- Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Joel,  like you, we are in MO and are have spent lots of time at Lake of the Ozarks. Also in Columbia. I think this is the most posters from MO I’ve ever seen posting on here!  
We are considering purchasing a scooter for my DH. I have rented scooters for my DH about three times in the last few years when cruising, plus a few times in Las Vegas. With Royal Caribbean you must contact, or have your travel agent contact, the accessibility department before you bring a scooter onto the ship.  At least they say that is the rule and we have done it. The form asks for information, espregarding the scooter.  I have always checked with the cruise line to make sure the scooter we are renting will fit through our cabin door. Each time we have rented through Solutions at Sea, and the service has been very good. The agents who have helped us have usually had prior knowledge of whether or not a particular type of scooter will fit through the cabin doors of a particular ship, but don’t rely on that. Do your own checking. In every case it has fit for us. Royal Caribbean cabin doors tend to be pretty wide. Especially on their newer ships. (I believe my husband’s rental scooters were 22 inches wide, or maybe 21.5”.)    We have only had an accessible cabin once on the Harmony OTS since they can be hard to get unless you book well in advance. So we have mostly had a regular sized cabin. I have had to make absolutely sure of the bed placement with a standard cabin. Beds must be on the far side of the  room, NOT nearer to the entry side or there will be no place to put a regular scooter. The big game changer that’s going to help you, and hopefully us, is a folding scooter. Our worst scenario was on Radiance OTS because it was really a tight squeeze. The crew offered to store it for us and charge it overnight. During the day there was a particular unused, out of the way little hall near the elevators where they allowed my dh to park it. Fortunately our cabin was just a couple of doors away. Some cruise lines have notoriously smaller standard cabins, especially on their older ships. (NCL, for instance.)  Some of the same people who have replied to you already have given me a lot of advice. The cost is very importance in our case. I have found lots of good and bad reviews online for just about every single brand and model of scooter. I absolutely wanted the scooter to be foldable and not one of the types that you take apart. I think those are excellent in some situations but not for us at present. I did look at a used Luggie foldable scooter yesterday for $1700. It was a bit heavy for me to lift but I could manage it. At $1700, without more certainty about it’s past,  even though it looked nice, I just could not pull the trigger for a used one., No I am sure most of the time they are fine. There are many videos and testimonies online. If you just do searches for folding mobility scooters you can get to these. Lots of YouTube and Google videos as well. My head was spinning trying to keep them and their features and prices straight! At $1700, without more certainty about its past even though it looked nice, I just could not pull the trigger on the used one. Plus I have seen so many reviews mentioning chargers that keep breaking or batteries that don’t last long at all even on brand new ones. At present I think we might get a Pride Go Go foldable scooter due to a combination of price, weight, and because it must be started with a key. Of course we have to buy a lithium battery which but the charge supposedly lasts longer with lithium and that type weighs less. One of the posters above said that they prefer to be wheeled to the jetway. My husband just needs to be wheeled to the gate because he can walk somewhat. His balance isn’t really great but he has managed to board a scooter so far. Just today I asked a therapist about the Pride brand. He was  very familiar with it and recommended it wholeheartedly. I’ve looked at a lot of top five, top six, top 10, mobility scooter ratings online. Some of them are not that current but some are. It’s good to read the reviews, especially the bad ones, to get some idea of what people have gone through. It may scare you off because it almost did me!  I don’t mean in reference to the Pride brand itself, but pretty much all the brands! Some issues sound like a fluke. Or the issue may have had more to do with a part that did not work from the start. Chargers and batteries seem to cause the most  problems.  About the only issues we have run onto re other passengers is so many walk around oblivious to those around them. They will walk right into the path of a scooter or wheelchair and butt in front of one without even being aware of it. When it comes to being able to get on an elevator,  at times you may have to be a bit bold to get your wife onto one and run interference for her. Otherwise the logistics of being on a ship and using a scooter or not that difficult. One last thing I’m concerned about is the ease of my husband riding his scooter to the gate in the airport versus getting pushed by a wheelchair attendant. The poster above is the first person I’ve seen commenting that they prefer getting taken to the gate. I’ve read you can still pass the security line and go to the front if you are on your own scooter. Yet I wonder how well that works at crowded times? Good luck & I hope you & your wife find a scooter a big plus! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have found that the larger airports we would wonder around in la la land not knowing where the gate is or we had to go downstairs in miami airport and where do we find an elevator and where do you go from there. seattle airport was really large  and we would have had a heck of a time finding the gate, and then we would have been standing in line waiting. when ask for wheelchair assistance we go right thru. no stopping, no waiting. i do know that you must have a FOLDABLE scooter in order to get on any of the excursion buses. especially alaska. they will not take your scooter if it does not fold.

Edited by 1threadshort

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ray,  I noticed in your photos you did not have armrests on your scooter.  Do you find it comfortable without the armrests? The model we are considering buying does not come with armrests.  One reviewer who bought them as an add-on had problems with them. My DH says he does not need them. The one we are  considering getting is a Pride GoGo folding one before we go on a cruise in just a few weeks.  I am concerned about it getting thrown around in cargo holes and such and winding up some place unable to use it because it was damaged by the handler’s. Someone on another thread advised buying homeowners insurance so I may look into that if we get it. Anyway I hope you see this and can reply about the comfort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem with those lightweight folding scooters is that the seats don’t swivel.  With my legs being fully involved from polio, I can’t use any scooter if the seats don’t swivel, because I can’t get out of a fixed seat.

 

With regards to flights, I’ve gone on more than 40 flights with my Golden EX scooter, and it’s been ok with the exception of Delta wrecking the scooter when we arrived in Miami for the cruise. I was insane with the thought of missing the cruise, but Scootaround was excellent in getting a GoGo scooter to our cabin.  Delta was difficult to deal with, but after a few tears and a bit of yelling, things worked out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone here for your advice. I read and read reviews and watched videos after video.  My husband finally agreed to the E V Rider scooter in red, manual folding because it has 2 front wheels. We ordered it from an Ohio dealer, I was more comfortable talking with a real person prior to ordering it. And, its getting here in 3 days from the headquarters in Florida, I was told.  He gave us 5% off, no tax as they are located out of state. It is the same price everywhere I looked, so I was pleased he offered us a discount and included a backpack that goes on the back of the scooter, no basket. So here's hoping its all I'm thinking it will be and that DH can adjust to his new ride. Thanks again, Pat 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2020 at 2:25 PM, VirginiaIsForCruisers said:

 

I can't speak to your other questions as I rent a scooter that doesn't fold up. However, on question 7, please tell your wife to take the scooter and enjoy the freedom it gives her. As long as she's not (literally) ramming into people and following the rules about not leaving it in the hallway, she deserves to enjoy her vacation as much as anyone else on the ship. There are always going to be some people who will be snotty about something or another. Don't worry about them.

This is the entitled generation.  I have had problems with those who cannot walk a straight line  (drunk perhaps) and stagger into me.  Next comes the chastisement I get for not warning them with a loud horn (which I don't have).

Then there is the elevator exit. I always say loudly, "Backing up' backing up"!  to warn of my intentions.  Ran over some toes after giving my warning and then was accused of being a bully and not looking behind me.  And I still know of no manufacturer who makes a scooter with a back up alarm or camera or rear view mirrors.

Also, the able bodied  entitlement bullies will push and shove to get on the elevator ahead of wheelchairs that have been first in line.  On occasion, I have told them it's Ok, I'll just take the stairs.

Many just don't care.  But fortunately, there are many more considerate and caring people who do care and are considerate.

And please:  Never leave you scooter or dirty dishes in the hall!  It is against the law!  SOLAS regulations.  You may be the cause of deaths in an emergency!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel,  sure hope you see this and can reply very soon!

 

I am wondering if you have ever had any problem with ground clearance with the EV Rider? Does it ever present problems? We are on the fence between two models and that is one thing I am concerned about. Both models are pretty much identical but made by different companies or at least have a different brand name. I think I can guess the pros of the scooter. Any cons that you can think of? if there is one thing you could change about the scooter what would it be? Sure hope you see this and can reply very soon! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Ray or someone in the know will get back to us.   The E V rider I just purchased for DH has a 24V 11.5Ah Lithium Battery. Any issues at airports?  I know I'm to remove the battery on the gangway and take it on board with me. Should I call the airlines? Hmmm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pat, see my reply to your earlier post re ion and polymer batteries. 

Edited by mlbcruiser

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2020 at 9:13 AM, mlbcruiser said:

Ray,  I noticed in your photos you did not have armrests on your scooter.  Do you find it comfortable without the armrests? The model we are considering buying does not come with armrests.  One reviewer who bought them as an add-on had problems with them. My DH says he does not need them. The one we are  considering getting is a Pride GoGo folding one before we go on a cruise in just a few weeks.  I am concerned about it getting thrown around in cargo holes and such and winding up some place unable to use it because it was damaged by the handler’s. Someone on another thread advised buying homeowners insurance so I may look into that if we get it. Anyway I hope you see this and can reply about the comfort.

So sorry for the delay in answering your question.  I guess it was another senior moment on my part.  I don't believe that any of the EV Rider foldable scooters have armrests.  I thought it was a bit awkward at first not having armrests but I got used to it and it has not caused me any comfort issues.  It actually give me more room get on and off the scooter.  I understand your concern about damage to the scooter while being stowed in the baggage compartment.  I have flown 5 times with the scooter and have not had any damage to the scooter...….Hope this helps.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...