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Emotional support animals


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1 hour ago, ilikeanswers said:

What exactly is appropriate certification/accreditation for a service animal? Especially if you are a business with international customers how are you suppose to know what is an official service certification/accreditation considering every country would have their own system🤔

For example this is what the P&O UK site has to say on the matter

 

P&O cruises accepts registered assistance dogs on board that have been specifically trained to assist a person with a disability and has been certified by an organisation that is a full member of Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF), the accrediting bodies for assistance dog organisations worldwide. All assistance dogs are carried free of charge.


Emotional support dogs are not recognised as an assistance dog by the above organisations and are not permitted on board.


Carriage of an assistance dog is subject to the conditions set by DEFRA (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs). 
As the DEFRA requirements are different from other forms of travel, it is essential owners understand the conditions that the dog must travel under.

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On 1/22/2020 at 9:35 PM, luisc25 said:

I don’t agreed, and I’m not one of those that have an emotional support animal. If I’m taking my dog I’m paying for her cabin pet fee or a seat. (Only when I can’t find someone to stay with her) 

In reality they are many people that really need the Emotional Support Animal specially people that have Psychological Disabilities like Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety, Panic Disorter, OCD, PTSD and Schizophrenia to name a few. 

 

These people decided to adopt a pet without a proper training because in reality Insurance doesn’t cover the training for Psychiatric Service Dog and it’s expensive. Also the ADA defines a disabling illness as an illness that physically or psychiatrically must limit one or more major life activities, such as walking, talking, seeing, hearing, learning, etc. If the illnesses do not limit one or more life activities, you do not qualify for a service animal but as you can see by the illness above a Dog can really help and reduce the anxiety for example.  

I'm sorry, but this is crap and it always has been. An animal is not a cure-all. Fortunately, the DOT is stepping up to fix the ADA's mistakes. The ADA will likely follow-up to exclude non-service animals.

Edited by fyree39
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6 minutes ago, fyree39 said:

I'm sorry, but this is crap and it always has been. An animal is not a cure-all. Fortunately, the DOT is stepping up to fix the ADA's mistakes. The ADA will likely follow-up to exclude non-service animals.

What mistake did the ADA make.  Emotional Support dogs are not covered under ADA rules and regulations.

 

Q3. Are emotional support, therapy, comfort, or companion animals considered service animals under the ADA?

A. No.  These terms are used to describe animals that provide comfort just by being with a person.  Because they have not been trained to perform a specific job or task, they do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.  

 

https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/service_animal_qa.html

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1 hour ago, fyree39 said:

I'm sorry, but this is crap and it always has been. An animal is not a cure-all. Fortunately, the DOT is stepping up to fix the ADA's mistakes. The ADA will likely follow-up to exclude non-service animals.

My academic background is in Psychology.I believe that service animals can help people who have psychological disorders.

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22 minutes ago, lenquixote66 said:

My academic background is in Psychology.I believe that service animals can help people who have psychological disorders.

However, they are not recognized as Service animals by the government unless they perform a specific task.  This includes PTSD dogs. See link in post 79

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1 minute ago, dkjretired said:

However, they are not recognized as Service animals by the government unless they perform a specific task.  This includes PTSD dogs. See link in post 79

I am not referring to animals who are brought by people on cruises.My point is that a dog or a cat can help people with emotional disorders.

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On 1/24/2020 at 4:10 PM, K32682 said:

There are cruise lines that do not permit ESAs or pets.  There are others with more accommodating policies regarding support and companion animals.  Select your line accordingly.  

 

 

 Is there a list published anywhere of those lines that do not allow animals on board or do we have to work our way through the T & Cs of each line to find that out?

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37 minutes ago, lenquixote66 said:

I am not referring to animals who are brought by people on cruises.My point is that a dog or a cat can help people with emotional disorders.

Fine but in the post I quoted you mentioned only Service animals.

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5 hours ago, ilikeanswers said:

What exactly is appropriate certification/accreditation for a service animal? Especially if you are a business with international customers how are you suppose to know what is an official service certification/accreditation considering every country would have their own system🤔


In the US there is no official certification.  You are not allowed to ask for any type of certification under the ADA. This is for Service animals

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8 minutes ago, dkjretired said:

Fine but in the post I quoted you mentioned only Service animals.

Yes,but Service animals do not necessarily have to be on cruises.They are primarily in people’s homes. People who have phobias can get great relief from having a service dog or cat by their side.

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10 minutes ago, lenquixote66 said:

Yes,but Service animals do not necessarily have to be on cruises.They are primarily in people’s homes. People who have phobias can get great relief from having a service dog or cat by their side.


Don’t disagree, by the way Cats cannot be Service animals according to US Justice department

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3 hours ago, dkjretired said:

However, they are not recognized as Service animals by the government unless they perform a specific task.  This includes PTSD dogs. See link in post 79

Actually PTSD is an ADA covered disability.

 

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

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2 hours ago, lenquixote66 said:

Yes,but Service animals do not necessarily have to be on cruises.They are primarily in people’s homes. People who have phobias can get great relief from having a service dog or cat by their side.


I think you are confusing service animals with emotional support animals. A person that uses a service animal needs it in all settings - at home, at work, out in the community, and on vacation.

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2 hours ago, lenquixote66 said:

Yes,but Service animals do not necessarily have to be on cruises.They are primarily in people’s homes. People who have phobias can get great relief from having a service dog or cat by their side.

Where did you get the idea that service animals are primarily in people's homes.  Do you think a blind person can see outside their home, thus doesn't need their guide dog or someone with seizures doesn't have them outside their home, etc.

 

 

Edited by NLH Arizona
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1 hour ago, dkjretired said:


Agree but Justice Dept recognizes them, go figure

Service horses will be trained and work just like service dogs. Miniature horses are best known for providing a service as a guide animal where they help guide someone who is blind or has visual impairments. 

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10 minutes ago, NLH Arizona said:

Where did you get the idea that service animals are primarily in people's homes.  Do you think a blind person can see outside their home, thus doesn't need their guide dog or someone with seizures doesn't have them outside their home, etc.

 

 

I am referring to animals in general.I had a friend who was murdered.His dog ,in its own way,helped the rest of the family.

 

 

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