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The new medically-fit-to travel forms for passengers 70 and older

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9 minutes ago, UUNetBill said:

I've actually overheard people telling other people how easy it is to 'beat the system' so they can bring Scraps on board with them.  Fires me up to no end...

 

 That kind of thing drives me wild - any kind of scamming does.  Only takes a few people to ruin a good thing for so many others, especially for those people who figure the 'rules' are for everyone else other than them! LOL  Take care!

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1 hour ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

I was going to respond to your post but went to the Regent website for another reason and found the following (this refers to the Pre-Embarkation Public Heath Questionnaire that I have tried to get posters to understand is in place (rather than the over 70 form).  This is the same information that we received last week regarding our yet to be cancelled cruise.

 

Denial of boarding will occur in the following cases:

  • Guests who have traveled from, visited or transited via airports in China, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea, Iran, or countries or regions identified by the CDC as having widespread ongoing transmission (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html) within 30 days of their voyage embarkation, regardless of nationality. Travel companions of these guests who share the same suite will also be denied boarding.
  • Guests who in the last 30 days have come into known direct contact with anyone who has traveled from, visited or transited via airports in China, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea, Iran, or countries or regions identified by the CDC as having widespread ongoing transmission (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html). Travel companions of these guests who share the same suite will also be denied boarding.
  • Guests who have traveled from, visited or transited via airports in identified COVID-19 quarantine or containment zones within 30 days of their voyage embarkation, regardless of nationality. Travel companions of these guests who share the same suite will also be denied boarding.
  • Any guest with a temperature detected at or above 100.4F / 38C. 
  • All persons who, within 30 days prior to embarkation, have had contact with, or helped care for, anyone suspected or diagnosed as having COVID-19, or who are currently subject to health monitoring for possible exposure to COVID-19.
  • All persons who have reported on the Pre-Embarkation Public Health Questionnaire or who appear symptomatic, are feeling unwell, are exhibiting flu-like symptoms, exhibit difficulty breathing or have chronic pulmonary or respiratory conditions.

Guests who are denied boarding will be issued a refund for monies paid for their cruise- only expenditures in the form of a 100% Future Cruise Credit.


I do not believe that this information will be standard once this nightmare is over. I have had COPD for many years. Never had a problem going anywhere on train, plane or ship. 

 

3 hours ago, scuba diver said:

Age will not create an issue for the implementation of The Certification of Medical Fitness for over 70 years of age.  If you feel that it is inappropriate it can be assaulted utilizing ADA.  However, the applicability of ADA in its entirety is suspect given past court rulings.  A recent action by the Justice Department gives hope that it would be enforced in most aspects to the extent that existing disabilities could not be discriminated against.  One such accommodation for a disability would be "use [of] a portable oxygen concentrator (10 years) and a scooter."  Any discrimination based upon such a disability would be an obvious violation of the provisions of the ADA.


I agree, based on ADA rulings, I could not be denied boarding on a ship. However, until this crisis is over, I would not board a train, plane or ship.

 

It’s all about preventing me from getting sick in normal situations. That’s on me!
 

Sheila

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Posted (edited)

There is no need for the signed medical form for people over 70.  People are dying in their 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and beyond!  And, has been discussed, and this remains true, you could go to the doctor 7 days prior to your cruise and be fine ...... be in contact with someone on the plane or airport and not show symptoms until you are on the ship.  

 

The only way to be sure that passengers do not have Covid-19 is to test them all with the new testing kit.  Unfortunately, there are not enough kits for people in the U.S. and there likely will not be enough available to test every cruise ship passenger.

Edited by Travelcat2

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2 hours ago, Pcardad said:

That form was only going to be required on ships boarding in the USA. A waiver was issued for a few trips and then cruises were cancelled and it was no longer in effect. It is unknown if it will be implemented again in the future.

Great point. The World has changed dramatically since this was issued. And it  was only issued as a stopgap to allow the cruise industry to show they were doing something. Can't believe that this is still being discussed. Patience.

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What hasn't changed is that before boarding a ship, you have to fill out a medical form, and sign it, making you legally responsible for your answers. This a requirement for international marine transit, and always has been, for many, many years.  It doesn't just apply to cruise ships, and predates cruise lines. The ship needs to present this information to the next port, so the passenger needs to provide it on embarkation, and the ship needs to be able to stand by it.

We took our boat to the Bahamas for many years and spent the winter there. On arrival in the first port in the Bahamas, we had to clear customs and immigration. We had to fill out a form that was obviously written for a larger vessel, asking many questions about the health of those onboard. It includes a question about any deaths that have occurred at sea since our last port, and their cause. This is the form that your cruise ship needs to provide before entering a port. They need the passengers to answer some of these questions (which include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, etc. within the last 72 hours). And they need to attest that the information is correct by the time they reach the next port. This has nothing to do with any laws in the US. They don't apply to international travel by ship. Maritime laws have existed for a very long time, and take precedence over other laws when it comes to ships.

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2 hours ago, Travelcat2 said:

There is no need for the signed medical form for people over 70.  People are dying in their 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and beyond!  And, has been discussed, and this remains true, you could go to the doctor 7 days prior to your cruise and be fine ...... be in contact with someone on the plane or airport and not show symptoms until you are on the ship.  

 

The only way to be sure that passengers do not have Covid-19 is to test them all with the new testing kit.  Unfortunately, there are not enough kits for people in the U.S. and there likely will not be enough available to test every cruise ship passenger.

By the time cruise ships start cruising again, the new Abbott testing machine, which takes 5 to 11 minutes, with a simple nasal or throat swab, should be available at all ports. They were approved last week, an have already been deployed in some of the hardest hit areas in the US, including Washington state and NYC, so we should have some confidence in the test by then.

I agree that testing for Covid-19 7 days before the cruise is worthless. I read today that in some places, health care workers have been tested daily with the existing kits, and confirmed that with someone who works in a hospital. I'm not sure how many kits are left for patients, but if the new machine works it should eliminate that problem.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/29/2020 at 7:27 PM, Bellaggio Cruisers said:


As many of you know, I am a combination of all the special needs, previously discussed. I use a portable oxygen concentrator (10 years) and a scooter. I don’t think anyone has ever complained about it. And, we have made many friends over the years.
I go on tours, but am very conscious of my fellow travelers, waiting to get of the bus until others are off. It it is too big a walk, I remain on the bus. 
I take very good care of myself, health wise, and bring every medication I might need. If I feel ill, I remain in our suite and rest it out. Unfortunately, I see too many folks onboard, who are younger, and coughing everywhere. I won’t infect them, but they can infect me, and many people on the ship. My physician loves the fact that we travel all over the world. He says that’s what keeps me going strong!
We do a lot of cruising. And spend a great deal of money, only on Regent!
Shame on you for wanting to discard me!

It’s up to you to find another cruise line of your liking.

As long as Regent will accept me, with my special needs, I will continue to sail with them. 

Sheila

Jackie... thank you for defending folks like me!

 

Sheila, I'm in a similar situation.  I, too, have COPD (I have the CO2 retention variety of emphysema, so no oxygen is needed yet), so I tend to get out of breath fairly easily.  As long as I take my time and walk slowly enough, I can get around on my own, no aids at all.  I also have asthma that is triggered primarily by environmental stimulants -- certain perfumes, caustic cleaning solutions, smoke, etc. so I sometimes cough.  Otherwise, I'm in good health according to my docs.  People who have met me on board may see the shortness of breath episodes and even some of the coughing, but it usually resolves within a few minutes and really doesn't impact anyone except me (it's a dry cough, and I always cough into my elbow anyway).  I hug the wall when I walk slowly from my cabin to the elevators, and I'm able to participate as I like in onboard activities (attending shows, lectures, pre-dinner cocktails, etc.).  

 

I started cruising because my pulmonologist recommended cruise travel as a way for me to see the world.  I was bemoaning the fact that I knew land-based tours would no longer work for me and I'd been saving since I was in my 20s so I could travel after I retired.  He said cruise travel might work well for me, so I booked my first cruise -- a 2-week Alaska cruise in 2017 on another cruise line.  I did fine, and I've been cruising a couple of times a year since then, mostly longer cruises (28+ days).  I embarked on the 2020 World Cruise with my doctor's blessings and although it ended early after only 53 days, I was doing just fine.

 

I've written about this before:  I'm VERY careful with excursions, choosing only those with the "little guy in the seat" icon, with words like "leisurely" and "panoramic" in the title.  Even then, I check with the Destinations team to make sure I understand exactly what will be required to get from the ship to the pickup point for the excursion.  Heaven forbid I should be THAT person who slows everyone else down.  If I don't think I can manage every aspect of the excursion, I won't take it.  Period.  I'm perfectly happy and comfortable hanging out on the ship.

 

Seriously, if people want to avoid encountering people like me on excursions, then choose excursions that fit your more advanced activity level.  There aren't that many that will work for me, and I'd hate to be the one whose mere existence made it so that your couldn't enjoy your cruise.  I'll be on only those with the lowest activity level -- "little guy in a seat" -- there aren't that many -- so do us all a favor and choose a higher-level activity excursion (one-, two-, or three-walker ratings).  Problem solved.  

 

As for muster, Regent has specific procedures designed for those with mobility issues -- once those with issues let Guest Services know their situation, Regent can make sure they can safely muster without impeding others.  They also have evacuation procedures in case of an emergency for those who are mobility challenged.  Regent, like most cruise lines, are happy to set up reasonable accommodations for those that need them.

 

There are probably those here who believe I shouldn't be allowed onboard a ship because of my limitations.  Reading here, it sure sounds like it.  I would not cruise if any of my doctors said I shouldn't, but all of them seem to be quite comfortable with it.  I intend to continue until such time as it becomes physically impossible -- or I run out of savings.  I keep saying I want the last check I write to bounce, so ... 😄

 

Lana (currently self-isolating after truncated World Cruise in Bellingham, WA)

 

 

 

 

Edited by ArtsyCraftsy

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You needn’t be apologetic. Cruising is great for people who have some physical limitations and want to have vacations, see the world a bit, eat well, and enjoy ship activities. Cruising is often the only viable option.

Those folks who are so robust and rip-roaring and just can’t stand those slower fellow cruisers? What the heck are they doing on a wussy cruise ship anyway? 

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Agree with bissel.  I believe that the posters that did not want to sail with seniors or the disabled are no longer posting on this thread.  I would guess that 99% of Regent cruisers are happy with the people that sail on Regent - regardless of age or disability. I am part of that 99%.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/29/2020 at 10:27 PM, Bellaggio Cruisers said:

 

As many of you know, I am a combination of all the special needs, previously discussed. I use a portable oxygen concentrator (10 years) and a scooter. I don’t think anyone has ever complained about it. And, we have made many friends over the years.
I go on tours, but am very conscious of my fellow travelers, waiting to get of the bus until others are off. It it is too big a walk, I remain on the bus. 
I take very good care of myself, health wise, and bring every medication I might need. If I feel ill, I remain in our suite and rest it out. Unfortunately, I see too many folks onboard, who are younger, and coughing everywhere. I won’t infect them, but they can infect me, and many people on the ship. My physician loves the fact that we travel all over the world. He says that’s what keeps me going strong!
We do a lot of cruising. And spend a great deal of money, only on Regent!
Shame on you for wanting to discard me!

It’s up to you to find another cruise line of your liking.

As long as Regent will accept me, with my special needs, I will continue to sail with them. 

Sheila

Jackie... thank you for defending folks like me!

To Lana
I am sorry, I messed up and deleted this accidentally. 
Your story is an inspiration to so many of us. Bless you and be safe and well!🙏

Edited by Bellaggio Cruisers

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My thanks to Bessel and Jackie and Wendy for supporting those of us who are special needs folks. 
We cant wait to go on our next cruise... dine, dine and more dining!

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To echo what has already been said, "You needn't be apologetic."  It appears as if you go out of your way to be thoughtful and respectful of your fellow cruise passengers.  It would be nice if everyone followed the behavior that you demonstrate.  I think back on my many cruises and still can picture people pushing to get on shore, into tenders, in line for food, etc.  Also, those who hold up excursions because they didn't meet the group on time or when they were inconsiderately shopping at the last minute, thereby holding up the return trip back to the ship.  And don't get me started on people who continue to drop their belongings on primo located deck chairs and leave their stuff there for hours, holding their place while they are eating lunch.    You can't imagine how many times I have been tempted to pick up their things and put them on the deck, but I can't be "one of those people," even if they are being "one of those people."  Life is too short to worry about someone's idea of who should or should not be cruising.  Those people who have no tolerance for people who have a physical disability, hopefully, won't find themselves in the same situation one day.  Will they find themselves a victim of the same thing about which they are currently complaining?  

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I looked on the Regent website for the 70 and over questionnaire. It seems to

have disappeared. Am I imagining this?

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19 minutes ago, gr'aunt said:

I looked on the Regent website for the 70 and over questionnaire. It seems to

have disappeared. Am I imagining this?

 

No.  As I have posted repeatedly, this never took effect (thankfully).  It was proposed prior to the cancellation of cruises on March 13, 2020.  All that is required now is for passengers to fill out a Medical Questionnaire (as we have done in the past).  Note:  This is for Regent only - no clue what other cruise lines are doing.

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2 hours ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

No.  As I have posted repeatedly, this never took effect (thankfully).  It was proposed prior to the cancellation of cruises on March 13, 2020.  All that is required now is for passengers to fill out a Medical Questionnaire (as we have done in the past).  Note:  This is for Regent only - no clue what other cruise lines are doing.

I took this screen shot 4 days ago , March 28th. When I went on Regent earlier today, I couldn’t find it. Instead, lots of new announcements under the Reassurance heading. The specific “Pre-embarkation Public Health Questionnaire” referenced in the March 23, 2020 General Travel Advisory (and still on the website 4 days ago) is no longer part of the updated March 30, 2020 General Travel Advisory. 

32BD51E3-B8A0-4C61-BA42-21000914A259.jpeg

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2 hours ago, gr'aunt said:

I took this screen shot 4 days ago , March 28th. When I went on Regent earlier today, I couldn’t find it. Instead, lots of new announcements under the Reassurance heading. The specific “Pre-embarkation Public Health Questionnaire” referenced in the March 23, 2020 General Travel Advisory (and still on the website 4 days ago) is no longer part of the updated March 30, 2020 General Travel Advisory. 

32BD51E3-B8A0-4C61-BA42-21000914A259.jpeg

 

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I think that but issuing this form, they basicly say NO to oldies to get on board. I am not sure that many doctors will put a stamp and their signature on such paper. Health status can be very unpredictable when you are old. Today you might be feeling alright and have no symptomps of anything and tommorow you are dead. Sorry for me being a bit to straight forward, but this is how things work in our world. This paper is a "say no to elderly people". This is how I see it. 

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Regent has come out with different statements for different situations.  We are booked on a cruise next month that will likely be cancelled.  However, Regent is going forward and sent us an email regarding boarding the ship.  It included the same verbiage as the form above.

 

If you have a cruise coming up, suggest that you call your TA.  All that I know (as of last week) is that there are no forms for passengers over the age of 70 to have their doctors complete.

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13 hours ago, Roger88 said:

I think that but issuing this form, they basicly say NO to oldies to get on board. I am not sure that many doctors will put a stamp and their signature on such paper. Health status can be very unpredictable when you are old. Today you might be feeling alright and have no symptomps of anything and tommorow you are dead. Sorry for me being a bit to straight forward, but this is how things work in our world. This paper is a "say no to elderly people". This is how I see it. 

 

Well yeah, maybe, but nowadays 70 is not elderly, is it?  I'm certainly not elderly.

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19 minutes ago, Pcardad said:

Confirmed today - this form is not in effect. 

 

Thank you!  Hope that you will be believed since I've posted the same thing numerous times.

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You may need an Immunity Passport to travel soon.  Countries including Chile, Germany, Italy, UK, and US are considering a physical or digital document confirming that a person has become immune to SARS-CoV-2.   This is being compared to the yellow fever immunization cards given to people traveling or living in Africa who have been vaccinated against the disease.  However there are many issues involved as you can imagine specifically people who may be eligible for immunity passports may not actually have access to them.  This could, in turn, create two different classes of people, those who are permitted to travel and those who aren't.  I am quoting from the following article as there are issues that the article goes into in depth.

 

https://www.fodors.com/news/coronavirus/will-i-need-an-immunity-passport-to-travel

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On 4/2/2020 at 1:16 PM, Wendy The Wanderer said:

 

Well yeah, maybe, but nowadays 70 is not elderly, is it?  I'm certainly not elderly.

The cruise lines will fight that tooth and nail because seniors are a huge part of their business.

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12 minutes ago, danielaocean said:

You may need an Immunity Passport to travel soon.  Countries including Chile, Germany, Italy, UK, and US are considering a physical or digital document confirming that a person has become immune to SARS-CoV-2.   This is being compared to the yellow fever immunization cards given to people traveling or living in Africa who have been vaccinated against the disease.  However there are many issues involved as you can imagine specifically people who may be eligible for immunity passports may not actually have access to them.  This could, in turn, create two different classes of people, those who are permitted to travel and those who aren't.  I am quoting from the following article as there are issues that the article goes into in depth.

 

https://www.fodors.com/news/coronavirus/will-i-need-an-immunity-passport-to-travel

 

I found the comments to be as interesting as the article

 

It does appear that an effective & accurate antibody test has now been developed (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52656808) but not sure that the immunity passport will be adopted.

Once an effective vaccine is developed then a Covid-19 vaccination certificate might be appropriate.

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Interesting article but likely not going to work - for many reasons.  The U.S. already has this test but does not know if there is any long-term (or short-term) immunity.  Also, some tests are proving unreliable.

 

When a new vaccine for Covid-19 comes out, hopefully, unlike the Yellow Fever Vaccination, that many people are unable to take  since it is a live vaccine (which puts elderly people at risk and people with compromised immune systems cannot take) there could be some type of requirement to have the vaccine prior to cruising.

 

Lastly, this assumes that a vaccine will be 100% effective rather than the current effectiveness of the flu vaccine.  Speaking of the flu vaccine, this should be required for all people that are physically able to take it (those with egg allergies cannot tolerate it).

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