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IS THIS THE FUTURE OF CRUISING ?


sidari
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Her template seems to come from Genting's plan for starting up cruises again.  I have to think cruising is going to get more expensive if cruise lines have to take on these measures.  Any lines that wants to stop at US ports are going to have to make similar changes.

 

http://gentingcruiselines.com/media/1267/20200408-genting-cruise-lines-announces-enhanced-preventive-measures-setting-new-standards-for-the-fleet-and-the-cruise-industry.pdf

 

 

20200408-genting-cruise-lines-announces-enhanced-preventive-measures-setting-new-standards-for-the-fleet-and-the-cruise-industry.pdf

Edited by Até
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2 hours ago, Até said:

Her template seems to come from Genting's plan for starting up cruises again.  I have to think cruising is going to get more expensive if cruise lines have to take on these measures.  Any lines that wants to stop at US ports are going to have to make similar changes.

 

http://gentingcruiselines.com/media/1267/20200408-genting-cruise-lines-announces-enhanced-preventive-measures-setting-new-standards-for-the-fleet-and-the-cruise-industry.pdf

 

 

20200408-genting-cruise-lines-announces-enhanced-preventive-measures-setting-new-standards-for-the-fleet-and-the-cruise-industry.pdf 203.26 kB · 0 downloads

 

Any cruise line that raises prices coming out of this is going to be in financial crisis for a while.  The demand for this kind of vacation in the short and medium term future is going to be bordering on an all-time low.  There have been many articles and authorities outright saying that the cruise industry is the leading candidate for how COVID-19 infected the United States.  There is going to be a significant anti-cruise community (that already existed due to the myriad of environmental issues these ships cause the planet) going forward that is going to actively and effectively try and scare people away from these vacations with hopes of bankrupting the industry, using the fears over this virus as leverage to make it happen.  Cruise lines are going to have to slash their prices if they hope to survive.

 

I'll say this, coming out of this whole ordeal, they're going to have to lower their prices for me to go again anytime soon.  The potential risk just isn't worth the price when I could get similar bang for my buck elsewhere.

 

And lets be realistic for a second... These cruise lines were making money hand over fist before this all happened, and instead of building up a slush fund to get them through a potential financial crisis, they instead invested heavily into stock buybacks, inflating their stock price to pad the pockets of executives and shareholders, so if some of these lines go belly-up, they only have themselves to blame.

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BF ... There was more likelyhood of the infection in the US having come from people flying in from China and Europe, despite being told in early January about the virus it was shrugged off as just another form of flu.

Only when deaths began to increase did the blame game begin, people need to look closer to home as to why their respective bodies did nothing and let money rule over common sense.

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3 minutes ago, sidari said:

BF ... There was more likelyhood of the infection in the US having come from people flying in from China and Europe, despite being told in early January about the virus it was shrugged off as just another form of flu.

Only when deaths began to increase did the blame game begin, people need to look closer to home as to why their respective bodies did nothing and let money rule over common sense.

 

I'm not saying I believe that to be the case, and I agree with your sentiment.  Unfortunately, in situations like this, the truth doesn't matter, its all about perception, and right now we're already seeing the push to make the perception of cruising inherently dangerous that should be avoided.  Major news outlets have already run OpEd pieces rhetorically asking "should we let the cruise industry die".  There's a push to put all of the blame on the US outbreak on them, and when cruising starts back up, there's going to be significant push back (to the point where I would not be shocked to see crowds of protesters outside ports in NY and others) to allowing cruise ships to sail in any city.  And if you go on one, do not be surprised if your own community tries to shun you because of the fear they're being fed about the industry.

 

That is the battle these cruise lines are going to face in getting people back on their ships.  And raising prices will be the quickest way to see the industry collapse upon itself.

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No question it will be hard times for the cruise industry for some time to come.  I'm not a corporate analyst but even the companies that have enough cash to survive this suspension are not going to be able to operate ships at a loss in the future.  The near future seems to involve not cramming as many people per square foot than in the past and also much higher costs to maintain preventative measures to a disease outbreak and spread.  It looks like due to government and self regulation they are going to lose 50% of their passengers regardless, I think it will be those people unwilling to pay for the mandated limited capacity and those who are worried about health threats involved with cruising.  Those losses are gone and it will be time to make cruise lines work with the current obstacles.

 

Ships with limited passenger capacity, more space between dining tables, reduced crowds at venues, shows and excursions, extensive pre boarding health screening and dedicated isolation wards if there is a problem sound better to me.  It all depends if these outweigh any lingering negatives like missing ports and disruption from ramped up cleaning protocols.  Perhaps my thoughts are distorted by my own feelings about continuing to cruise, but I don't think it outrageous to believe 50% of past cruisers are still going to want to cruise sometime in the next year.  I won't be able to afford up to a possible doubling of cruise prices to make up for the loss of other passengers so I've kept deposits on several bookings just in case.  Hopefully the cruise lines are willing to make less profit and won't raise prices too much, have you read the threads about NCL's current pricing?  I don't think their significant price increases are all about FCC's needing to be used.  I sure haven't seen any fire sales to fill up ships on future sailings.

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9 hours ago, Beardface said:

 

Any cruise line that raises prices coming out of this is going to be in financial crisis for a while.  The demand for this kind of vacation in the short and medium term future is going to be bordering on an all-time low.  There have been many articles and authorities outright saying that the cruise industry is the leading candidate for how COVID-19 infected the United States.  There is going to be a significant anti-cruise community (that already existed due to the myriad of environmental issues these ships cause the planet) going forward that is going to actively and effectively try and scare people away from these vacations with hopes of bankrupting the industry, using the fears over this virus as leverage to make it happen.  Cruise lines are going to have to slash their prices if they hope to survive.

 

I'll say this, coming out of this whole ordeal, they're going to have to lower their prices for me to go again anytime soon.  The potential risk just isn't worth the price when I could get similar bang for my buck elsewhere.

 

And lets be realistic for a second... These cruise lines were making money hand over fist before this all happened, and instead of building up a slush fund to get them through a potential financial crisis, they instead invested heavily into stock buybacks, inflating their stock price to pad the pockets of executives and shareholders, so if some of these lines go belly-up, they only have themselves to blame.

 Booked for 1/2022 on another cruise line.i booked before all this commotion.anyway I did a mock booking last night to see if prices dropped.they actually went up $500 and no o.b.c. what so ever.i believe there are going to be price increase for sure along with cutbacks on food and entertainment.i also believe they will put all these new ships being built on hold.

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10 hours ago, scpirate said:

 Booked for 1/2022 on another cruise line.i booked before all this commotion.anyway I did a mock booking last night to see if prices dropped.they actually went up $500 and no o.b.c. what so ever.i believe there are going to be price increase for sure along with cutbacks on food and entertainment.i also believe they will put all these new ships being built on hold.

I wonder how long it will take the cruise lines to get a trained staff to return, reconfigure details for "safer cruising," and secure main theatre entertainment?  I can envision a much reduced buffet served by the crew, three dining times with more distancing, and the menu selection to be quite limited. Unfortunately, I imagine the feedback and reviews from passengers will be brutal as many will want cheaper cruises but the same standards as before. 

 

I also wonder what cruising will look like with a much reduced average age as those over 65/70 will likely not chose or even be allowed to cruise.

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11 hours ago, scpirate said:

 Booked for 1/2022 on another cruise line.i booked before all this commotion.anyway I did a mock booking last night to see if prices dropped.they actually went up $500 and no o.b.c. what so ever.i believe there are going to be price increase for sure along with cutbacks on food and entertainment.i also believe they will put all these new ships being built on hold.

 

And this is why I would strongly suggest anyone who is looking to cruise to wait until we have a hard date on when things are going to open back up, and to see that ships are actually sailing again.  The second these lines realize people just how much the demand has cratered and that ships are sailing at 2/3 capacity at most, they'll have to adjust to bring the prices back down.

 

Right now, there is no incentive for them to change their pricing structure.  They know that regardless of where the price is set, the large majority of the people who will be cruising want to see ships sail and want to see measures in place before they book.  Anyone they get to book now, knowing there is an indefinite ban on the industry here in the US (yes, its 100 days, but it came with a very ominous "we can also extend this if we feel like it" disclaimer) they are pretty much viewing as a sucker who will pay whatever price they set.

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It's all about supply and demand. Until this shakes out, I expect both reduced pricing and quality.  Cruisers are loyal to cruising, but make up a  small portion of the travel market. I also believe it is doubtful the big three will all survive.

 

Edited by BermudaBound2014
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1 minute ago, BermudaBound2014 said:

It's all about supply and demand. Until this shakes out, I expect both reduced pricing and quality.  Cruisers are loyal to cruising, but make up a VERY small portion of the travelers. It's doubtful the big three will all survive.

 

 

If I was NCL I'd already be working internally to roll out a completely new business model by the time everything opens back up.  Nickel and diming only works when demand out paces supply, because people are going to be happy enough to be taking part that they won't mind the extra payments here and there.  In a time where demand has cratered, the nickel and diming culture they have adopted is going to effectively put up a forcefield around their ships.  Yeah, they'll have NCL loyalists who will book just because its NCL, but coming out of this, the average consumer isn't going to want to put up with that BS anymore.

 

If anything, I would not be shocked if the concept of specialty dining goes away in the short term, with those venues included with your booking.  The lines that will succeed in bringing passengers back the quickest will be the ones who offer the sailing options that are as close to all-inclusive as it gets, including a drastic rollback, if not flat out elimination of the concept of the drink package, at least for the time being.

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NCL and MSC have similar business models (as far as I can tell without being able to see MSC financials). At least with new ship design. In fact, wasn't the first 'away' class a MSC design (or was that visa versa)? Anyway, the new builds of both companies have terrible space ratios. Pack them in, and make money on-board. Both companies charge more for 'exclusive' space. MSC does it with the experience. NCL will sell you vibe on-board. NCL has an interesting concept with the solo areas on many of their new builds which sets them apart in the market, but they omitted them on Joy which makes me think that solo might not be lucrative in the long run. MSC has YC which does set them apart.

 

I'm feeling like cruises are going to go in the opposite direction regarding inclusive. I think you will see MSC prices offered on most lines ($299 pp balcony 7 night range), but the up sell once on-board will be intense. Lines are going to need to bribe passengers to sail for quite some time.  

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4 hours ago, BermudaBound2014 said:

NCL and MSC have similar business models (as far as I can tell without being able to see MSC financials). At least with new ship design. In fact, wasn't the first 'away' class a MSC design (or was that visa versa)? Anyway, the new builds of both companies have terrible space ratios. Pack them in, and make money on-board. Both companies charge more for 'exclusive' space. MSC does it with the experience. NCL will sell you vibe on-board. NCL has an interesting concept with the solo areas on many of their new builds which sets them apart in the market, but they omitted them on Joy which makes me think that solo might not be lucrative in the long run. MSC has YC which does set them apart.

 

I'm feeling like cruises are going to go in the opposite direction regarding inclusive. I think you will see MSC prices offered on most lines ($299 pp balcony 7 night range), but the up sell once on-board will be intense. Lines are going to need to bribe passengers to sail for quite some time.  

 

I believe this is the most current.

 

https://www.msccruises.com/en-gl/Assets/MSC Cruises Annual report 2019.pdf

 

 

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