Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
Cailey53

News on Fincantieri shipyards

Recommended Posts

Yes, Europe is starting to reopen slowly and carefully.  We do not want a setback in the recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m sure that some of the ships will be slightly delayed. . . But so glad they are able to reopen!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Good to know they are slowly getting back up and running. For all of us on the Ryndam

Premier Sailing (and subsequent sailings), we anxiously await the update for a presumed delayed schedule.

 

Edited by boze9999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a lot of catching up to do. I'm sure there will be a lot of delayed sailings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing many of those ships will not be completed as it will likely be a long time until new equipment is a priority. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They may want to work VERY slowly on these new builds.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if they got orders from the buyers to slow WAY down or to delay delivery by months if not a year or more...at least until we know what the "new normal" looks like for our beloved cruise industry as a whole.  But then again this is only a guess on my part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think dragging the delivery date out by months or years is possible.  These ship yards have schedules, and they can't allow a partially finished hull to sit in a very expensive drydock until the customer feels that he can afford to take delivery.   Once the keel is laid, that mass of steel cannot be moved to some holding area until the cruise market is right for delivery.  The funds for the delivery are already allocated.   It's a done deal.   The ship yard has hundreds of millions of Euros invested and they want their final payment.  The cruise line cannot pay for an unfinished ship, so they will be completed as soon as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question of a company being able to not permit a shipyard as ordered by a cruise company really deserves a different thread.  Such has happened in the recent past.

 

An unknown named company in Libya ordered a cruise ship  whose hull was finished.  Money apparently ran out.  Building stopped.  Eventually, MSC bought the unfinished ship and had it completed (whether or not at the same shipyard or not, I don't know).  It sails as the MSC Preziosa.

 

NCL's Pride of America began her life in a shipyard in either Mississippi or Alabama in the same way.  The ordering company lacked the funds to complete the build out.  NCL bought the partly built vessel, took it to an European shipyard (if I recall correctly), and finished her.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will start up slowly .  That will  put the RYNDAM back by a few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/24/2020 at 5:56 AM, Sue from Canada said:

Wow, that's quite a list of ships on order.  Thanks for posting the site.

With not much money left to pay for them.

 

Virgin airlines if you believe the press is on the verge of collapse so a cruise ship

 

NCLH - just had loan deferrals so who knows if they will build out the Leonardo class

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

An article on the 'other' major cruise ship builder Meyer. in Germany.

 

https://cruisefever.net/cruise-lines-tell-shipyard-they-wont-need-some-of-the-new-cruise-ships-they-ordered/

 

Cruising had been exploding as we all know and it is hard to imagine all this new capacity would have been needed even in a 

'perfect' cruising world.   

Edited by chisoxfan
change phrase

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

NCL's Pride of America began her life in a shipyard in either Mississippi or Alabama in the same way.  The ordering company lacked the funds to complete the build out.  NCL bought the partly built vessel, took it to an European shipyard (if I recall correctly), and finished her.  

 

 

 

I thought it was just the opposite — the ship was started overseas, but because it was finished in a US shipyard it meets the PVSA standard of a US build.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Cindy said:

 

I thought it was just the opposite — the ship was started overseas, but because it was finished in a US shipyard it meets the PVSA standard of a US build.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

from Wikipedia



the first of a pair of 70,000 ton cruise ships to be built at the Litton-Ingalls shipyard in Mississippi

A special exemption on the part of the U.S. government allowed the modified, mostly German-built ship to attain U.S. registry.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pride_of_America

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any ship that has had its keel laying will most likely be delivered, albeit with delays of 6-18 months. I foresee any ships on order that have not yet reached that stage of construction to be delayed indefinitely or cancelled. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, AtlantaCruiser72 said:

Any ship that has had its keel laying will most likely be delivered, albeit with delays of 6-18 months. I foresee any ships on order that have not yet reached that stage of construction to be delayed indefinitely or cancelled. 

 

I agree.  Or in whatever new build state the ship may be, the hull may be sold to whomever to become a different ship for a different company.  It has happened before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rkacruiser said:

 

I agree.  Or in whatever new build state the ship may be, the hull may be sold to whomever to become a different ship for a different company.  It has happened before.

RKAcruiser and AtlantaCruiser72:

 

You both seem more knowledgeable about these matters than I do. So I'll ask you: where is the new Ryndam in this process? I'm booked on its initial transatlantic in early October, 2021 (nearly five months after its announced maiden cruise), but I'm becoming concerned about whether the ship will be completed by then (if at all).

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, jimdee3636 said:

RKAcruiser and AtlantaCruiser72:

 

You both seem more knowledgeable about these matters than I do. So I'll ask you: where is the new Ryndam in this process? I'm booked on its initial transatlantic in early October, 2021 (nearly five months after its announced maiden cruise), but I'm becoming concerned about whether the ship will be completed by then (if at all).

 

Jim

 

I wish I could answer your question, Jim.  I don't know.  I have posted that question on CC and have not had any really informative information.  One suggestion was to access the shipyard's web site, if such is possible.  I have not tried to do so, however.  Even then, as laymen, I am not sure any information that we might learn would be of much help as to answering your question.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with the Quark Expeditions Team!
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...