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SS/RCCL Finances: Improving, Options, Questions??!!


TLCOhio
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2 minutes ago, TrulyBlonde said:

True, but remember we are on a different cruise board and I assume many here are not into the installment plan category. Crazy times

 

Quite right and I did consider adding that an "installment plan type of cruise paying" to my post applied to no one on this Message Board.  

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3 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

I wonder how many people cruising are Average Joe? 

Millions

 

4 hours ago, TrulyBlonde said:

Average Joe will not have the extra vacation funds for a cruise 😞

Average Joe in America saved an incremental $3.7 trillion dollars during the pandemic. He’s going on vacation this summer, come hell or high water. Mark my words.

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12 hours ago, Stumblefoot said:

Average Joe in America saved an incremental $3.7 trillion dollars during the pandemic. He’s going on vacation this summer, come hell or high water. Mark my words.

 

Not sure as to exactly how an "Average Joe" (or Jane) might be defined economically.  Portions of our population have built up their savings/cash accounts significantly.  Others in the "middle" are challenged for a variety of reasons. The American "Middle Class" is a little different than existed a couple of decades back. Appreciate all of these great comments and follow-ups.  Keep it coming.  Interesting times!!  

 

From a financial news website this morning, they had this headline: Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian May Add an Extra Charge" with this sub-headline: "The three cruise lines have a problem, and it could soon get passed on to the passengers.

 

Here are some of their story highlights:Anyone who takes a cruise understands that the ticket price never quite reflects everything you pay. You can opt out of extras, but most people end up dipping into their wallets for everything from shore excursions, premium dining, and onboard purchases. Yes, you get a lot for the basic price of your ticket, but the cruise lines put a lot of temptations in front of you.  Now, Royal Caribbean, Carnival Cruise Line and Norwegian Cruise Line face a situation where they may have to add a new fee that customers would not be able to opt out of. It's  caused by world events and it's one that could be around for a while. Oil prices have been rising, and they're likely to push higher due to Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Traditionally the major cruise lines pass on the extra cost to their customers via a fuel surcharge. That's something that's in the fine print of your cruise contract (the part very few people ever actually read).

 

Here is more background: "When this may actually happen will vary among Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian because each cruise line makes different choices in how it buys fuel. It's not like the captain just pulls a ship into some sort of floating gas station and pays the given price. Royal Caribbean Chief Financial Officer Naftali Holtz explained his cruise line's situation during its fourth-quarter earnings call.  '[So] for us, it's obviously fuel prices are up from 2019. And just as a reminder, we also hedged a little bit over half of our fuel at what would be below-market prices over the last couple of months, so we're benefiting from that -- from these actions,' he said."

 

Fuel hedging!!  Glad that RCL has been doing that.  But how long will that last before a surcharge will be imposed during a time when major portions of cruise market is still challenged and not fully back to peak booking levels?

 

Full story at:

https://www.thestreet.com/investing/royal-caribbean-carnival-norwegian-fuel-surcharge-oil

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Summer 2019 Calgary, Jasper/Banff National Parks, Western Canada Rocky Mountaineer rail adventure, Vancouver, sailing up to Alaska on Silver Muse, post-cruise excursion to Denali, etc.  Many visuals and details from our first in these scenic areas!  Live/blog: 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2682584-live-terryohio-silver-muse-alaska-canadarockies-pix’s/

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

My phone said beep that I got them, now the only way is up I hope 🙂

 

I hope our friend from Ohio can show today's graph of CCL and the 2 minutes that it went below $15. 😁 

 

Edited by AmazedByCruising
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7 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Not sure as to exactly how an "Average Joe" (or Jane) might be defined economically.  Portions of our population have built up their savings/cash accounts significantly.  Others in the "middle" are challenged for a variety of reasons.

 

I agree with Stumblefoot, the people of whom I think is the average cruiser have not been to a restaurant for 2 years. They didn't lose their job due to Covid. That adds up. So much money in the bank, working from home, they decided to improve their house when a vacation wasn't really an option. It would be so much nicer to work from home and have a nicer home. 

 

So, they are calling contractors and they are all saying they're busy till 2023, maybe 2024. And you are paying twice as much for materials. Well, a cruise is better 🙂

 

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9 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Not sure as to exactly how an "Average Joe" (or Jane) might be defined economically.  Portions of our population have built up their savings/cash accounts significantly.  Others in the "middle" are challenged for a variety of reasons. The American "Middle Class" is a little different than existed a couple of decades back. Appreciate all of these great comments and follow-ups.  Keep it coming.  Interesting times!!  

 

 

The definition of "Average Joe" may be in flux in the near future.  An Average Joe of two months ago may now begin to feel less than an Average Joe due to the impact of the economic situation due to the Ukraine war. 

 

For the cruise industry, will the economic situation of their potential guests become more important than the Covid issues that still remain?  

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35 minutes ago, rkacruiser said:

For the cruise industry, will the economic situation of their potential guests become more important than the Covid issues that still remain? 

 

Most people are so sick and tired of Covid that they simply embark. (I'm not one of them, but I'm also the only one wearing a mask in the supermarket). 

 

For economic reasons: I believe Stumblefoot is right. Enough money to spend on a cruise. And people so fed up with Covid feeling that they deserve "the ultimate vacation", which for Average Joe, is a cruise.

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9 minutes ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

Most people are so sick and tired of Covid that they simply embark. (I'm not one of them, but I'm also the only one wearing a mask in the supermarket). 

 

For economic reasons: I believe Stumblefoot is right. Enough money to spend on a cruise. And people so fed up with Covid feeling that they deserve "the ultimate vacation", which for Average Joe, is a cruise.

I still wear my mask in the supermarket too. I live at a ski resort with people arriving from all over the world. When our mountain closes in April, I will remove it. DH already took his off, but Nervous Nelly (me) has kept us safe for over 2 years now. Sick and tired of Covid but still alive.

Average Joe are my children, my hairdresser, etc. that have been impacted. I hear their stories and help subsidize my children with help for rent etc. When my daughter in CA sent me a text with a copy of her fuel charge, my 10 yr old Grandson called and his words for it were "Sleepy".

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14 hours ago, TrulyBlonde said:

I still wear my mask in the supermarket too. I live at a ski resort with people arriving from all over the world. Nervous Nelly (me) has kept us safe for over 2 years now. Sick and tired of Covid but still alive.  Average Joe are my children, my hairdresser, etc. that have been impacted. I hear their stories.

 

From our friend in Colorado, appreciate these above comments and follow-up.  My wife is in the somewhat, maybe "Nervous Nelly" category.  I am more "flexible", like your husband. It has been challenging in seeking the right and perfect "balance" during these times.  We will keep working to get through this . . . safely!!  

 

From Forbes business magazine this morning, they had this headline: What’s Happening With Norwegian Cruise Line Stock? with these highlights:Norwegian Cruise Line, the third-largest cruise line operator, has seen its stock price decline by about 21% over the last week, underperforming the S&P 500, which was down by about 4% over the same period. The stock also remains down by about 25% over the last month. The recent sell-off is largely due to the war between Russia and Ukraine, which is likely to impact travel and leisure players with a global presence. Norwegian has already indicated that it would remove Russian ports of call from its itineraries. Moreover, the conflict has resulted in oil prices surging to 13-year highs. This could impact profitability, considering that fuel expenses accounted for about 11% of Norwegian’s cruising costs in 2019. Moreover, with the geopolitical uncertainty, investors could be pivoting back to safe-haven stocks, and away from highly-leveraged cruising companies.  However, now that NCLH stock has seen a decline of about 25% over the last month, will it continue its downward trajectory in the near term, or is a recovery imminent?  Going by historical performance, there is a higher chance of a rise in NCLH stock over the next month. Out of 57 instances in the last nine years that NCLH stock saw a twenty-one-day decline of 25% or more, 37 of them resulted in NCLH stock rising over the subsequent one-month period.  This pattern suggests that NCLH stock may see higher levels in the next month. We estimate Norwegian Cruise Lines valuation to be around $15 per share, roughly in line with the current market price.

 

Full story at:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2022/03/09/whats-happening-with-norwegian-cruise-line-stock/?sh=47f38c1c2e5b

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Barcelona/Med: June 2011, with stops in Villefranche, ports near Pisa and Rome, Naples, Kotor, Venice and Dubrovnik. Great visuals with key highlights, tips, etc. Live/blog now at 254,552 views.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1426474

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On 3/10/2022 at 4:00 PM, AmazedByCruising said:

And sold them at 17.66. I believe we need to wait for really good news for an improvement. 

 

What will be the "really good news" that our friend from Holland is seeking?  .Last week on Wednesday morning, there was improving news as the stock values went up early that am and stayed somewhat stable for the rest of the week.  Good enough?  

 

From the Wall Street Journal below are the charts for the three major cruise lines.  More telling is the Royal Caribbean stock values, year-to-date.  Things have not recovered to the more positive, higher levels seen in January and February, 2022.  The early March slide was serious.  Clearly the combination of the Ukraine invasion, stopping Russian port stops and spiking fuel costs, etc., have had their impacts.  And, values are still a long, long ways from the pre-Covid cruise company levels.  

 

Other reactions and comments?

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio 

 

Norway Coast/Fjords/Arctic Circle cruise from Copenhagen, July 2010, to the top of Europe. Scenic visuals with key tips. Live/blog at 243,711 views.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1227923

 

From the Wall Street Journal late Friday afternoon, below are two charts for Royal Caribbean.  First shows their market values from the past five trading days.  Second shows their stock pricing since the first of this year.  Next are the charts during the past week for the other two major cruise lines.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

954930311_ScreenShot2022-03-11at7_53_31PM.thumb.png.227b1e087b7984ae2e69c63b01ee50c8.png

 

1407145308_ScreenShot2022-03-11at7_52_59PM.thumb.png.1766341226f6d4048a33e40352fe3a11.png

 

511005933_ScreenShot2022-03-11at7_54_16PM.thumb.png.1452230f537455df0b2f596943399d76.png

 

1575437711_ScreenShot2022-03-11at7_55_01PM.thumb.png.dd6e5ba937fafc563dc3833e18f1cb44.png

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On 3/12/2022 at 2:59 PM, TLCOhio said:

What will be the "really good news" that our friend from Holland is seeking?  .Last week on Wednesday morning, there was improving news as the stock values went up early that am and stayed somewhat stable for the rest of the week.  Good enough?  

 

Real world good news 🙂  Not a nice looking graph. Fewer deaths and miseries.

 

While Covid numbers in The Netherlands are higher than ever, a combination of vaccinations and an attitude of "we don't care anymore" instead of the fear 2 years ago have led to an almost complete "freedom". I think that's world wide. People getting Long Covid or worse are now a part of life. Not for me, I'm wearing my mask, but for potential cruisers, the 98% that doesn't wear a mask and looks at me as if I must have a very uncommon disease instead of common sense. 

 

So I think we are already at a point that cruise companies should be worth almost what it was end of 2019, except we have a situation in Ukraine. I have no idea how that is going to end. 

I guess really good news is that it would end. 

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3 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

Real world good news 🙂  Not a nice looking graph. Fewer deaths and miseries.

 

While Covid numbers in The Netherlands are higher than ever, a combination of vaccinations and an attitude of "we don't care anymore" instead of the fear 2 years ago have led to an almost complete "freedom". I think that's world wide. People getting Long Covid or worse are now a part of life. Not for me, I'm wearing my mask, but for potential cruisers, the 98% that doesn't wear a mask and looks at me as if I must have a very uncommon disease instead of common sense. 

 

So I think we are already at a point that cruise companies should be worth almost what it was end of 2019, except we have a situation in Ukraine. I have no idea how that is going to end. 

I guess really good news is that it would end. 

 

So do I.  I'm still wearing my mask!

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On 3/13/2022 at 9:49 PM, Lirio said:

 

So do I.  I'm still wearing my mask!

 

Which is the sensible thing to do. Even with all jabs you could get, you can still get Covid (and will, if you're not careful). And while you won't end up in hospital (probably), there is an endless list of nasty symptoms to which new findings are added daily. Not for all, but maybe 10% will have to live with a range of things that are just recently being discovered. 

 

I must admit I'm heavy addicted to smoking, but simply putting up a mask is much easier than not lighting up another cigarette. 

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On 3/13/2022 at 1:02 PM, AmazedByCruising said:

While Covid numbers in The Netherlands are higher than ever, a combination of vaccinations and an attitude of "we don't care anymore" instead of the fear 2 years ago have led to an almost complete "freedom". I think that's world wide.  So I think we are already at a point that cruise companies should be worth almost what it was end of 2019, except we have a situation in Ukraine. I have no idea how that is going to end. 

I guess really good news is that it would end. 

 

Appreciate these above comments and follow-up regarding the question of whether the cruise ship stock values would be back to "normal" if not for the Ukraine invasion.  Personally, I doubt it.  See the below article.  Oil prices are going down, down.  Good news.  And, Covid, as detailed by what is going on in China, Germany, etc., is not going away.  Still tangled and confused!!?? 

 

From the Wall Street Journal this morning, they had this headline: Oil Slides Below $100, Stock Futures Edge Up" with this sub-headline: "Chinese stocks extend rout over renewed Covid-19 fears.”

 

Here are some of their story highlights:Oil prices and Chinese stocks slumped after Beijing imposed sweeping Covid-19 lockdowns, while U.S. stock futures edged higher ahead of the start of a cycle of interest-rate rises from the Federal Reserve.  Futures tied to the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average each gained 0.2% Tuesday while technology-heavy Nasdaq-100 futures rose 0.4%. Oil prices dropped back below $100 a barrel, undoing much of the price surge since Russia invaded Ukraine. West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark, dropped over 8% to $94.69 a barrel. Brent crude, the international benchmark, declined over 7% to $98.59 a barrel. Chinese indexes slid further, extending a recent rout fueled by the country’s rising Covid-19 case load, renewed regulatory pressure from Beijing and the threat of U.S. delistings. China’s daily cases more than doubled, the government said Tuesday, in an outbreak that has prompted lockdowns in major cities and an entire province.  A clampdown in travel and retail spending in China, coupled with supply-chain disruptions, adds yet another complication to a global economy already dealing with the war in Ukraine and the highest inflation in a generation.

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/global-stocks-markets-dow-update-03-15-2022-11647333255?mod=hp_lead_pos1

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio 

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 235,045 views.

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Yes, it might look as if the drop in oil prices has had its impact!!  From the Wall Street Journal below you can see the big upward movement this morning.  Carnival was up nearly 5% and Norwegian was up 6.3%.  Is my speculation correct that the downward price movement for oil has caused this positive shift for the cruise lines?

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 94,689 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

 

From the Wall Street Journal, here is how the big jump-up look late this morning.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see this visual larger/better!)

1541694518_ScreenShot2022-03-15at11_07_21AM.thumb.png.399729d8d0aa5a04ececbf5b05ac493a.png

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9 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Yes, it might look as if the drop in oil prices has had its impact!!  From the Wall Street Journal below you can see the big upward movement this morning.  Carnival was up nearly 5% and Norwegian was up 6.3%.  Is my speculation correct that the downward price movement for oil has caused this positive shift for the cruise lines?

 

Fuel cost is 20% or so. Oil prices might go up and down, but not 10-fold. Hard to extract oil would suddenly become profitable, people would switch to gas or coal for their energy needs. In Europe nuclear and even coal are back on the table for electricity.

 

Also if the fares go up industry-wide because all companies need to pay more for fuel, I don't believe many would opt for a land based vacation instead because fares went up 20% or so.

 

I think it's investor's crystal balls saying that Ukraine might be moving towards agreement with Russia a tiny bit more than yesterday. Any slight remark by any ambassador could change that. 

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From MSN News and this financial website earlier this past week, they had this headline: Why Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Stocks All Popped  with these highlights:Oil is the primary reason.  Cruise line stocks got crushed early last week as oil prices spiked toward $130 a barrel. But as the price of oil has ebbed, cruise line stocks have recovered steadily.  Oil for fuel -- specifically, ultra-low sulfur marine diesel -- is one of the biggest costs cruise companies incur when running their operations, making up anywhere from 12% to 19.5% of operating expenditures. (Carnival, for example, pays as much as $2 billion per year for the stuff.) So if oil is getting cheaper, that's good news for cruise line stocks.  Additionally, as CNBC reported this morning, several airlines raised their revenue outlooks this morning, 'saying air travel is rebounding from the earlier slump induced by the spread of the Covid omicron variant.'  Because travelers must often fly to their ports before boarding for an ocean cruise, a rebound in airplane ticket demand may presage improved cruise vacation bookings as well.

 

Here is more from their analysis: "Don't get too excited about cheaper oil prices, however, because they won't necessarily -- or quickly -- translate into cheaper fuel costs at the company level. CNBC, for example, noted that jet fuel prices are still up 35% in just the first three months of this year.  Oil priced in the neighborhood of $95 a barrel is still about 30% more expensive than average prices over the past year.  Don't expect this to translate into better cruise line profits just yet."

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/why-carnival-royal-caribbean-and-norwegian-cruise-stocks-all-popped-today/ar-AAV5LGz?ocid=BingNewsSearch

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

AFRICA?!!?: Fun, interesting visuals, plus travel details from this early 2016 live/blog. At 52,463 views. Featuring Cape Town, South Africa’s coast, Mozambique, Victoria Falls/Zambia and Botswana's famed Okavango Delta.

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From the below-linked financial website on Friday, they had this headline: How Investors Should Evaluate Post-Pandemic Rallies in Cruise Line Stocks with these highlights: “The last two years have been incredibly unkind to cruise ship operators. As if the pandemic dragging on weren’t enough, the recovery and then Russia’s aggression pushed oil prices to multi-year highs, increasing operating costs significantly. Unsurprisingly, industry stocks are still trading at fractions of their pre-covid prices, but they have rallied occasionally when conditions improve slightly, only to collapse again with each new crisis. They are currently in one of those rallies and the question for investors is -- can it be sustained?

 

Here is more from this analysis: "In the past, I have been skeptical of post-pandemic rallies in cruise line stocks. Two of the three stocks I spoke about in that piece, Royal Caribbean and Carnival, are back around the levels they were at the time, while the other, Royal Norwegian, is trading around 9.5% lower than it was then. Unlike three months ago, though, this rally looks like one that investors should consider joining, at least in the case of one of them.   I didn’t believe that many people would want to cruise after experiencing covid. Confining yourself to an enclosed space with thousands of strangers seemed an unappetizing prospect to me. I was wrong to some extent. Booking numbers have recovered remarkably quickly, but they still haven’t been enough to overcome the second problem I had with cruise stocks back in December – liquidity.   Obviously, a sustained hit to passenger numbers at a time of rising costs due to global inflation and the probability of rising interest rates in response to that inflation, hit the industry hard. Cruise lines are capital intensive, which is a posh way of saying that big boats don’t come cheap. Companies in the industry are always heavily indebted, which is fine with a healthy cash flow and ultra-low interest rates, but that can quickly become a problem when either one changes, let alone both together.   Right now, changes in those conditions are hitting two of the above-mentioned stocks hard. Both RCL and NCLH have liquidity issues, as evidenced by their current ratios."

 

Interesting comments and insights?  What will it mean for the future with continued inflation and higher interest rates affecting consumer attitudes?

 

Full story at:

https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/how-investors-should-evaluate-post-pandemic-rallies-in-cruise-line-stocks

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Athens & Greece: Many visuals, details from two visits in a city with great history, culture and architecture.  Now at 43,926 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1101008

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9 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Both RCL and NCLH have liquidity issues, as evidenced by their current ratios."

 

For NCLH, their issues are more concerning to me than RCI's.  That is one reason why I have no position in NCLH.  

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On 3/20/2022 at 6:19 PM, rkacruiser said:

For NCLH, their issues are more concerning to me than RCI's.  That is one reason why I have no position in NCLH.  

 

Agree that over time in the past two years looking at the values for the three major cruise companies that NCLH has been viewed by most as the weakest.  That does not make them bad, just maybe not as big and/or flexible as for Carnival and Royal Caribbean..  

 

Below are charts for the three major cruise lines.  Kind of up, down and then back up.  No clear reasons and/or guess as to why and how.  From the Wall Street Journal, one headline and lead paragraph today summarized it this way: "Stocks Wobble, but Finish With Weekly Gains" and "U.S. stocks gave up some of their early advance Friday as investors gauged the Ukraine war’s impact on commodity prices and inflation."

 

Full story at: 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/global-stocks-markets-dow-update-03-25-2022-11648197425?mod=markets_lead_pos1

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Lisbon, NWSpain, Bordeaux/Brittany: Live/blog, June 2017 from Portugal to France along scenic Atlantic Coast on the Silver Spirit.  Now at 32,239 views.  Many interesting pictures, details for history, food, culture, etc.:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2511358

 

From the Wall Street Journal late Friday afternoon, below are two charts for Royal Caribbean.  First shows their market values from the past five trading days.  Second shows their stock pricing since the first of this year.  Next are the charts during the past week for the other two major cruise lines.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

1012747864_ScreenShot2022-03-25at4_42_04PM.thumb.png.8e8dfd46c777455b846a8f40d73a803d.png

 

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242144665_ScreenShot2022-03-25at4_43_10PM.thumb.png.7db6986abd87658f9c5b2bb28832d121.png

 

496105315_ScreenShot2022-03-25at4_44_25PM.thumb.png.5b7e6dd3f1d78736e9486aa8f85abda7.png

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During the past few weeks, the soaring cost of oil came up as a potential factor dropping the values for the cruise stocks.  In early March 2022, oil was up to $124 per the below WSJ chart.  Then that pricing went down.  In mid March, that cost fell down to $95 per barrel based on the below chart.  More recently, that price has moved back up.  Now, it is not as high as on March 8, but it is still upward.  

 

During there past 52 weeks, this oil index has ranged from $57.63 to $130.50 per barrel.  

 

From the Wall Street Journal's sister publication of Barron's this afternoon, they had this headline: Oil Prices Have Surged. Now, Demand Shows Signs of Easing in Response. with these highlights:Oil prices have spiked above $100 per barrel because there is too little supply and too much demand. To get prices down, either supply has to rise or demand has to fall.  So far, there is little sign of supply coming back. But in the past few weeks, there have been some signs that demand is dropping in response to high prices.  'After a month of oil prices we have not seen in nearly a decade and weeks of record-high fuel prices, high-frequency data suggest that consumers are beginning to react,' wrote Natasha Kaneva, head of commodities research at J.P. Morgan.  That drop in demand may be one reason that oil has not risen to new records above $147 a barrel. Brent crude, the international benchmark, rose 1.4%, to $120.65 a barrel on Friday. West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark, was up 1.4%, to $113.90.  In Europe, mobility is declining after rebounding from the initial Omicron wave, and China is imposing new restrictions on movement due to a Covid wave there.  'In China, road congestion data show that driving in major Chinese cities has dropped significantly in March as Covid cases grow exponentially and the government enacts regional lockdown measures,' Kaneva wrote.  In the United States, demand had held up until recently in most areas. In California, however, vehicle miles traveled are starting to flatten out, which Kaneva blames on high gasoline prices.

 

Full story at: 

https://www.bing.com/news/search?q=oil+price+per+barrel&go=Search&qs=n&form=QBNT&sp=-1&pq=oil+price+per+barrel&sc=8-20&sk=&cvid=A5592DB3E43E47AEB672A3B17469385B

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Panama Canal? Early 2017, Fort Lauderdale to San Francisco adventure through Panama Canal.  Our first stops in Colombia, Central America and Mexico, plus added time in the great Golden Gate City. Now at 31,094 views.

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From the Wall Street Journal late Friday afternoon, below is what has happened with crude oil pricing per barrel during the past three years.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

1358033691_ScreenShot2022-03-25at5_26_12PM.thumb.png.5d4f088893cedfef2a51bcb1b5c7143d.png

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2 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

During the past few weeks, the soaring cost of oil came up as a potential factor dropping the values for the cruise stocks.

 

I don't understand the point of your post.  There is nothing there that anyone of us does not know.  

 

As an owner of a few energy related equities in my portfolio, I would like to see some "spark" in their valuations.  

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13 hours ago, rkacruiser said:

I don't understand the point of your post.  There is nothing there that anyone of us does not know.  As an owner of a few energy related equities in my portfolio, I would like to see some "spark" in their valuations.  

 

Oh, so our SW Ohio neighbor wants me to solve the challenges facing the energy industry and its stock values?  That's way above my pay grade and skill set.  Fun comment and follow-up!!  Glad that I do not directly own any of those stocks these days with the "Greenies" attacking them and trying to put them out of business.  Fair or unfair summary?

 

From the Wall Street Journal's sister publication of Barron's earlier this week, they had this headline: Carnival’s Earnings Missed Estimates as Omicron Hit. Now There’s the Ukraine War.” with these highlights:Carnival ’s results for its latest quarter fell short of expectations as the Omicron variant of Covid-19 hindered the postpandemic recovery in travel. Now, the cruise operator is taking a hit from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and its effect on fuel prices.  The company said it expects another net loss in the second quarter before returning to profit in the third. It expects a loss for the full year.   The cruise operator posted a net loss of $1.9 billion, or $1.66 a share, with revenue of $1.62 billion for its fiscal first quarter, which runs through the end of February. Both figures were considerably weaker than expected.

 

Here is more from their reporting: "The company said the Omicron variant both hurt bookings and caused higher cancellations of existing reservations. Cruise costs in 2022 will be significantly higher than in 2019, partly due to expenses incurred by restarting fleet operations as well as inflation, it said, noting that many of those costs won’t continue in 2023. The higher costs, as well as the uncertainty around Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, including its effect on fuel prices, were having a “material impact” on its businesses, it said."

 

WOW!!  A nearly two billion dollar loss in one quarter is kind of like "real money".  Right?   Will Carnival and the other cruise lines really be able to return to profits in the third quarter of 2022?

 

Full story at:

https://www.barrons.com/articles/carnival-ccl-stock-earnings-51647885316?refsec=travel

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

From late 2018, see “Holy Lands, Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Dubai, Greece, etc.”, with many visuals, details and ideas for the historic and scenic Middle East. Now at 20,749 views.  Connect at:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2607054-livenautica-greece-holy-lands-egypt-dubai-terrypix’s/

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